1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Can win startup login be eliminated?

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by ECLiPSE 2002, Feb 24, 2010.

  1. ECLiPSE 2002

    ECLiPSE 2002 Flightless Bird

    New to using Win 7 Home Premium. I am the sole user of the PC and see
    no purpose in clicking a user login each time I start windows. Is
    there a way to go directly to windows without the login?

    TIA

    Mary
     
  2. Zaphod Beeblebrox

    Zaphod Beeblebrox Flightless Bird

    "ECLiPSE 2002" <fdm2000@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:d0rao5dft4qgkgmc4qv5a79m4hd2m2r64t@4ax.com...
    > New to using Win 7 Home Premium. I am the sole user of the PC and
    > see
    > no purpose in clicking a user login each time I start windows. Is
    > there a way to go directly to windows without the login?
    >


    Click the start "orb", type NETPLWIZ and press enter. In the list of
    users, click the one you want to log in automatically, then un-check
    the box at the top that says "Users must enter a username and password
    to use this computer". Click OK, and you'll be asked to put in the
    password for the account. That should do it.

    --
    Zaphod

    Arthur Dent, speaking to Trillian about Zaphod:
    "So, two heads is what does it for a girl?"
    "...Anything else he's got two of?"
     
  3. neil

    neil Flightless Bird

    "ECLiPSE 2002" <fdm2000@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:d0rao5dft4qgkgmc4qv5a79m4hd2m2r64t@4ax.com...
    > New to using Win 7 Home Premium. I am the sole user of the PC and see
    > no purpose in clicking a user login each time I start windows. Is
    > there a way to go directly to windows without the login?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Mary


    Works for XP perhaps it will for Win7
    http://wiki.ljackson.us/Control_Userpasswords2
     
  4. Al Smith

    Al Smith Flightless Bird

    ECLiPSE 2002 wrote:
    > New to using Win 7 Home Premium. I am the sole user of the PC and see
    > no purpose in clicking a user login each time I start windows. Is
    > there a way to go directly to windows without the login?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Mary



    When I boot my computer with Windows 7, I am taken directly into
    Windows 7. No login screen. There must be a way to eliminate your
    login screen. I'm sorry, I don't know offhand what it might be,
    but I'm sure you can fix this problem.

    -Al-
     
  5. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Flightless Bird

    "Al Smith" <invalid@address.com> wrote in message
    news:hm3qs9$8o7$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > ECLiPSE 2002 wrote:
    >> New to using Win 7 Home Premium. I am the sole user of the PC and see
    >> no purpose in clicking a user login each time I start windows. Is
    >> there a way to go directly to windows without the login?
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> Mary

    >
    >
    > When I boot my computer with Windows 7, I am taken directly into Windows
    > 7. No login screen. There must be a way to eliminate your login screen.
    > I'm sorry, I don't know offhand what it might be, but I'm sure you can fix
    > this problem.
    >
    > -Al-
    >

    With mine I have never set up User accounts, so it just goes to Win. When I
    am using one of them at work I do change it to require a password, so if
    someone is casually trying to look, they will not be able to. This is not
    real secure, but keeps honest people honest so to speak. I go in and out of
    this in the control panel, user accounts. When I have it at home I just
    remove the password, then at start up, or wake up, it just goes to Windows.
    --
    There are three kinds of men: The ones that learn by reading. The few who
    learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence and
    find out for themselves.
    Will Rogers
     
  6. jsmith

    jsmith Flightless Bird

    "ECLiPSE 2002" <fdm2000@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:d0rao5dft4qgkgmc4qv5a79m4hd2m2r64t@4ax.com...
    > New to using Win 7 Home Premium. I am the sole user of the PC and see
    > no purpose in clicking a user login each time I start windows. Is
    > there a way to go directly to windows without the login?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Mary

    ---------------
    Yes its...Start/Control panel/user account/add remove account/ you will see
    it there
     
  7. ECLiPSE 2002

    ECLiPSE 2002 Flightless Bird

    Thanks to all responders for their kindness in offering suggestions.

    Mary


    On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 13:15:43 -0500, ECLiPSE 2002 <fdm2000@comcast.net>
    wrote:

    >New to using Win 7 Home Premium. I am the sole user of the PC and see
    >no purpose in clicking a user login each time I start windows. Is
    >there a way to go directly to windows without the login?
    >
    >TIA
    >
    >Mary
     
  8. ECLiPSE 2002

    ECLiPSE 2002 Flightless Bird

    Tried methods suggested here and for some reason I still get a square
    box like icon the appears that gives my user name and says locked.
    Qindows won't start until I click on the icon. Why or how it is locked
    is confusing to me.

    "The Start/Control panel/user account/add remove account/ you will see
    there" suggestion doesn't work for me - there is no add remove account
    that I can find under user account?

    Mary




    On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 20:48:24 -0000, "jsmith" <John@nospamthanks.co.uk>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >"ECLiPSE 2002" <fdm2000@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >news:d0rao5dft4qgkgmc4qv5a79m4hd2m2r64t@4ax.com...
    >> New to using Win 7 Home Premium. I am the sole user of the PC and see
    >> no purpose in clicking a user login each time I start windows. Is
    >> there a way to go directly to windows without the login?
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> Mary

    >---------------
    >Yes its...Start/Control panel/user account/add remove account/ you will see
    >it there
     
  9. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Flightless Bird

    "ECLiPSE 2002" <fdm2000@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:unffo555qns2jade0qovjcmob8b48vvkmb@4ax.com...
    >
    > Tried methods suggested here and for some reason I still get a square
    > box like icon the appears that gives my user name and says locked.
    > Qindows won't start until I click on the icon. Why or how it is locked
    > is confusing to me.
    >
    > "The Start/Control panel/user account/add remove account/ you will see
    > there" suggestion doesn't work for me - there is no add remove account
    > that I can find under user account?
    >
    > Mary
    >
    >
    >


    Ok, it's been a while since I changed it, so I just did again to make sure I
    am remembering this right. <G>
    When I removed my password that I added, it boots to Win. if I boot cold,
    from a complete shut down. This was done from the User accounts in control
    panel, remove password.
    Now when I put it to sleep, then woke it, it had that box I had to click,
    saying it was locked, since it had, had a password before. Nothing to enter
    any more, just click the box. To remove that I had to go to power options in
    control panel, click require password on wakeup, then click change setting
    that are currently available, and it would allow me to check a box saying
    don't require a password. Then when I put it to sleep, and woke it, it went
    strait to Windows nothing to click.
    --
    Things get better with age. I'm approaching magnificent!!
     
  10. Gordon

    Gordon Flightless Bird

    "Alex Clayton" <Alexx1400@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:K9ednRH769w5bhrWnZ2dnUVZ_sOdnZ2d@nventure.com...
    > "ECLiPSE 2002" <fdm2000@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:unffo555qns2jade0qovjcmob8b48vvkmb@4ax.com...
    >>
    >> Tried methods suggested here and for some reason I still get a square
    >> box like icon the appears that gives my user name and says locked.
    >> Qindows won't start until I click on the icon. Why or how it is locked
    >> is confusing to me.
    >>
    >> "The Start/Control panel/user account/add remove account/ you will see
    >> there" suggestion doesn't work for me - there is no add remove account
    >> that I can find under user account?
    >>
    >> Mary
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Ok, it's been a while since I changed it, so I just did again to make sure
    > I am remembering this right. <G>
    > When I removed my password that I added, it boots to Win. if I boot cold,
    > from a complete shut down. This was done from the User accounts in control
    > panel, remove password.
    > Now when I put it to sleep, then woke it, it had that box I had to click,
    > saying it was locked, since it had, had a password before. Nothing to
    > enter any more, just click the box. To remove that I had to go to power
    > options in control panel, click require password on wakeup, then click
    > change setting that are currently available, and it would allow me to
    > check a box saying don't require a password. Then when I put it to sleep,
    > and woke it, it went strait to Windows nothing to click.
    > --
    > Things get better with age. I'm approaching magnificent!!
    >
    >


    When will Windows Users get out of this "I don't need a password but I need
    to run as Admin" mindset?

    Is it co-incidence that the Operating Systems least affected by hackers and
    viruses are run a) as a User and not Admin (aka Root) and b) have passwords?
     
  11. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Flightless Bird

    "Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:hm8soo$1qh$1@news.eternal-september.org...

    >
    > When will Windows Users get out of this "I don't need a password but I
    > need to run as Admin" mindset?
    >
    > Is it co-incidence that the Operating Systems least affected by hackers
    > and viruses are run a) as a User and not Admin (aka Root) and b) have
    > passwords?
    >


    OK, I am always willing to learn more, since I know LITTLE about this. Why
    is it I need to a user account? How is it that something bad is going to get
    into the PC, because I don't have a user account set up?
    --
    "Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites.
    Moderation is for monks."

    [Lazarus Long]
     
  12. Gordon

    Gordon Flightless Bird

    "Alex Clayton" <Alexx1400@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:pLednSyQt5sJZxrWnZ2dnUVZ_j-dnZ2d@nventure.com...
    > "Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:hm8soo$1qh$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >
    >>
    >> When will Windows Users get out of this "I don't need a password but I
    >> need to run as Admin" mindset?
    >>
    >> Is it co-incidence that the Operating Systems least affected by hackers
    >> and viruses are run a) as a User and not Admin (aka Root) and b) have
    >> passwords?
    >>

    >
    > OK, I am always willing to learn more, since I know LITTLE about this. Why
    > is it I need to a user account? How is it that something bad is going to
    > get into the PC, because I don't have a user account set up?


    It's another line of defence. If you run as a Standard User with a password
    then (hopefully) anything untoward will have difficulty in doing anything
    because it will need a password to continue. You should most certainly NOT
    run on a day to day basis as an administrator with no password.
    You do have a User account - you can't run windows without one ever since
    XP. What is important is the TYPE of user account.
    You should also give the built-in Administrator account a strong password
    and make sure that the Guest account is disabled (by default - but it
    doesn't do any harm to check that it IS disabled...)
     
  13. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Flightless Bird

    "Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:hm8u4b$6ou$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >
    > "Alex Clayton" <Alexx1400@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:pLednSyQt5sJZxrWnZ2dnUVZ_j-dnZ2d@nventure.com...
    >> "Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >> news:hm8soo$1qh$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>
    >>>
    >>> When will Windows Users get out of this "I don't need a password but I
    >>> need to run as Admin" mindset?
    >>>
    >>> Is it co-incidence that the Operating Systems least affected by hackers
    >>> and viruses are run a) as a User and not Admin (aka Root) and b) have
    >>> passwords?
    >>>

    >>
    >> OK, I am always willing to learn more, since I know LITTLE about this.
    >> Why is it I need to a user account? How is it that something bad is going
    >> to get into the PC, because I don't have a user account set up?

    >
    > It's another line of defence. If you run as a Standard User with a
    > password then (hopefully) anything untoward will have difficulty in doing
    > anything because it will need a password to continue. You should most
    > certainly NOT run on a day to day basis as an administrator with no
    > password.
    > You do have a User account - you can't run windows without one ever since
    > XP. What is important is the TYPE of user account.
    > You should also give the built-in Administrator account a strong password
    > and make sure that the Guest account is disabled (by default - but it
    > doesn't do any harm to check that it IS disabled...)
    >


    OK, I'm not trying to be a smart ass here, but I still did not see an answer
    here.
    I realize I have an account, the default account when I set up the new PC.
    I use AV, a firewall and anti malware, and am not interested in porn
    sites, or opening some link that claims to be the latest picture of some
    starlet with her pants down.
    I have no top secret info on my laptop, and all of it is backed up, so if
    someone steals it, I just put it all back on the new one. What I am looking
    for is what is it I need to fear, enough to set up a separate account? I
    guess what is it that someone is going to do to my PC, that they can't do
    because I set up a separate account instead of using the default
    (Administrator) account. ??
    --
    To err is human.....
    But to blame someone else shows management potential.
     
  14. Dave

    Dave Flightless Bird

    "Alex Clayton" <Alexx1400@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:pLednSyQt5sJZxrWnZ2dnUVZ_j-dnZ2d@nventure.com...
    > "Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:hm8soo$1qh$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >
    >>
    >> When will Windows Users get out of this "I don't need a password but I
    >> need to run as Admin" mindset?
    >>
    >> Is it co-incidence that the Operating Systems least affected by hackers
    >> and viruses are run a) as a User and not Admin (aka Root) and b) have
    >> passwords?
    >>

    >
    > OK, I am always willing to learn more, since I know LITTLE about this. Why
    > is it I need to a user account? How is it that something bad is going to
    > get into the PC, because I don't have a user account set up?
    > --
    > "Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites.
    > Moderation is for monks."
    >
    > [Lazarus Long]


    With the admin and user accounts setup with a password, any time you try to
    install, modify or delete something the User Account Control (UAC) will pop
    up a box requiring you to enter your admin password. Some softwares are so
    strict they will only let you install from the admin account so you have to
    switch users. This prevents any malware that happens to get on your computer
    from doing any of the above. If you're doing something other than the above
    on your puter and the UAC box pops up then that can be an indication you
    need to check your firewall, run your virus and malware scanners. (You do
    have those don't you? If they're smart enough to run them on Unix then we
    should be just a smart.) Sometimes it's aggravating but it does offer
    another layer of security, after all, talented people like Frank and Alias
    sometimes get tired of trying to piss people off in ng's and start writing
    malware, so it can come in handy.
    HTH,
    Dave
     
  15. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Flightless Bird

    "Dave" <davidj92@wowway.com> wrote in message
    news:hJOdnTgK4aPbjBXWnZ2dnUVZ_rOdnZ2d@sigecom.net...
    >
    >
    > "Alex Clayton" <Alexx1400@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:pLednSyQt5sJZxrWnZ2dnUVZ_j-dnZ2d@nventure.com...
    >> "Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >> news:hm8soo$1qh$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>
    >>>
    >>> When will Windows Users get out of this "I don't need a password but I
    >>> need to run as Admin" mindset?
    >>>
    >>> Is it co-incidence that the Operating Systems least affected by hackers
    >>> and viruses are run a) as a User and not Admin (aka Root) and b) have
    >>> passwords?
    >>>

    >>
    >> OK, I am always willing to learn more, since I know LITTLE about this.
    >> Why is it I need to a user account? How is it that something bad is going
    >> to get into the PC, because I don't have a user account set up?
    >> --
    >> "Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites.
    >> Moderation is for monks."
    >>
    >> [Lazarus Long]

    >
    > With the admin and user accounts setup with a password, any time you try
    > to install, modify or delete something the User Account Control (UAC) will
    > pop up a box requiring you to enter your admin password. Some softwares
    > are so strict they will only let you install from the admin account so you
    > have to switch users. This prevents any malware that happens to get on
    > your computer from doing any of the above. If you're doing something other
    > than the above on your puter and the UAC box pops up then that can be an
    > indication you need to check your firewall, run your virus and malware
    > scanners. (You do have those don't you? If they're smart enough to run
    > them on Unix then we should be just a smart.) Sometimes it's aggravating
    > but it does offer another layer of security, after all, talented people
    > like Frank and Alias sometimes get tired of trying to piss people off in
    > ng's and start writing malware, so it can come in handy.
    > HTH,
    > Dave
    >


    Yes I have AV, and AM, and do run both at least a couple times a week. In
    all the years I have been using a PC (since about 01) I don't think they
    have ever found anything. I do have the UAC left on on this machine. I had
    it turned off in Vista because it went off with everything and was just a
    PITA.
    So even with me running the Admin account, I take it something I did not
    ask for would still make the box pop up for me then? Since I got Win.7 the
    reason I left the UAC alone is that is about the only time it still pops up,
    is when I am loading something new. Even stuff loaded from the MS site, sets
    it off asking me to OK it.
    So if some malware is going to set off the UAC, that's good enough for me.
    --
    Hard work pays off in the future. Laziness pays off now.
     
  16. Pulse

    Pulse Flightless Bird

    You can run *with* a password, but set up Windows to automatically log you
    on, so you don't need to type it in each time you boot. You can also clear
    the screen saver's password requirement. Voila - the security of a password
    without having to type it in all the time.



    "ECLiPSE 2002" <fdm2000@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:d0rao5dft4qgkgmc4qv5a79m4hd2m2r64t@4ax.com...
    > New to using Win 7 Home Premium. I am the sole user of the PC and see
    > no purpose in clicking a user login each time I start windows. Is
    > there a way to go directly to windows without the login?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Mary
     
  17. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 26 Feb 2010 18:50:51 -0500, "Pulse" <pulse@nospam.net> wrote:

    > You can run *with* a password, but set up Windows to automatically log you
    > on, so you don't need to type it in each time you boot. You can also clear
    > the screen saver's password requirement. Voila - the security of a password
    > without having to type it in all the time.



    Why do you think having a password to log you on without your having
    to know and enter it provides the security of a password?

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  18. Pulse

    Pulse Flightless Bird

    Prevents anyone from logging onto resources etc. etc. via a network or some
    such etc. etc. so a password is better than no password, even if logon is
    automated.



    "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:s4ogo5511bh545tre9c2m0snjf98vehkke@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 26 Feb 2010 18:50:51 -0500, "Pulse" <pulse@nospam.net> wrote:
    >
    >> You can run *with* a password, but set up Windows to automatically log
    >> you
    >> on, so you don't need to type it in each time you boot. You can also
    >> clear
    >> the screen saver's password requirement. Voila - the security of a
    >> password
    >> without having to type it in all the time.

    >
    >
    > Why do you think having a password to log you on without your having
    > to know and enter it provides the security of a password?
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  19. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 26 Feb 2010 19:06:08 -0500, "Pulse" <pulse@nospam.net> wrote:

    > Prevents anyone from logging onto resources etc. etc. via a network or some
    > such etc. etc. so a password is better than no password, even if logon is
    > automated.



    Yes, with networks, this can well be the case. But as a general rule,
    for most people, there's *no* value to having a password used in such
    a way.


    > "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:s4ogo5511bh545tre9c2m0snjf98vehkke@4ax.com...
    > > On Fri, 26 Feb 2010 18:50:51 -0500, "Pulse" <pulse@nospam.net> wrote:
    > >
    > >> You can run *with* a password, but set up Windows to automatically log
    > >> you
    > >> on, so you don't need to type it in each time you boot. You can also
    > >> clear
    > >> the screen saver's password requirement. Voila - the security of a
    > >> password
    > >> without having to type it in all the time.

    > >
    > >
    > > Why do you think having a password to log you on without your having
    > > to know and enter it provides the security of a password?
    > >
    > > --
    > > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > > Please Reply to the Newsgroup


    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  20. Pulse

    Pulse Flightless Bird

    It's a just a rule of thumb with me - a password is better than no password.
    And yes, agreed, situations differ.



    "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:rnogo5lm2nruq87dgve9hec0smo6fdbaak@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 26 Feb 2010 19:06:08 -0500, "Pulse" <pulse@nospam.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Prevents anyone from logging onto resources etc. etc. via a network or
    >> some
    >> such etc. etc. so a password is better than no password, even if logon is
    >> automated.

    >
    >
    > Yes, with networks, this can well be the case. But as a general rule,
    > for most people, there's *no* value to having a password used in such
    > a way.
    >
    >
    >> "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    >> news:s4ogo5511bh545tre9c2m0snjf98vehkke@4ax.com...
    >> > On Fri, 26 Feb 2010 18:50:51 -0500, "Pulse" <pulse@nospam.net> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> You can run *with* a password, but set up Windows to automatically log
    >> >> you
    >> >> on, so you don't need to type it in each time you boot. You can also
    >> >> clear
    >> >> the screen saver's password requirement. Voila - the security of a
    >> >> password
    >> >> without having to type it in all the time.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > Why do you think having a password to log you on without your having
    >> > to know and enter it provides the security of a password?
    >> >
    >> > --
    >> > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    >> > Please Reply to the Newsgroup

    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     

Share This Page