1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

XP to Windows 7

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by bobster, Feb 3, 2010.

  1. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running XP/Sp3/IE8
    with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the same
    software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a gift of
    a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives. My
    questions:

    If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
    else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
    have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other HDs.
    But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that will
    prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to get W7
    up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of my
    2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and two
    XP systems.

    Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I don't
    want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to W7
    eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP capability
    on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a back
    up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with W7.

    Any problem with doing this?
     
  2. peter

    peter Flightless Bird

    lets see if I got this right...
    on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and therefore
    you are dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
    Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1 and
    #2???

    If you disconnect the external drive and boot from the W7 disk during the
    process pick
    one of the internal HD to install to..W7 will create the dual boot and change
    the MBR on the
    other drive to reflect this dual boot. Be aware that the MBR will be on the XP
    HD and as such
    if you remove this drive your system will not boot without a W7 repair.
    Look at
    www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/8057-dual-boot-installation-windows-7-xp.html


    The other way is if your mobo BIOS supports the F12 boot menu option.
    By disconnecting all drives except the drive where you will install W7 onto
    there is no MBR change on the XP drive and you just do a normal installation.
    Then when W7 is up and running you reconnect the XP drive. During the boot
    process you should see a quick message to push F12 and a small window pops up
    where you can pick the HD to boot from.

    peter

    --
    If you find a posting or message from me offensive,inappropriate
    or disruptive,please ignore it.
    If you dont know how to ignore a posting complain
    to me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate :)

    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running XP/Sp3/IE8
    > with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the same
    > software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    > internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a gift of
    > a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives. My
    > questions:
    >
    > If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
    > else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
    > have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other HDs.
    > But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    > installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that will
    > prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to get W7
    > up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of my
    > 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and two
    > XP systems.
    >
    > Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I don't
    > want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to W7
    > eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP capability
    > on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a back
    > up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with W7.
    >
    > Any problem with doing this?
    >
    >
     
  3. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Peter, you said,

    "lets see if I got this right...
    on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and therefore
    you are dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
    Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1 and
    #2???"

    Yes, that is correct. It sounds kinda crazy but I wanted a "hot spare" on
    the 2nd internal drive and an external spare in the event the of a computer
    failure. With HD prices at <$50 a pop it's a fairly cheap way to ensure an
    always ready backup.

    I really have no need to have a true dual boot W7/XP system. What I really
    want is 3 independent bootable systems on 3 different HDs, selectable by the
    F-12 boot menu option which my Dell computer has. Your suggestion of
    disconnecting the #2 internal and the external HDs and loading W7 on the #1
    internal HD, then re-connecting the XP HDs sounds like it would give me what
    I'm looking for. And BTW, that's exactly what I do now -- use F-12 during
    the boot sequence to select which of the 3 HDs to which I want to boot. You
    have given me the courage to give W7 a low risk try.

    Thanks

    =============================================================
    "peter" <peter@nowhere.net> wrote in message
    news:%23gO5oUUpKHA.4860@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    lets see if I got this right...
    on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and therefore
    you are dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
    Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1 and
    #2???

    If you disconnect the external drive and boot from the W7 disk during the
    process pick
    one of the internal HD to install to..W7 will create the dual boot and
    change
    the MBR on the
    other drive to reflect this dual boot. Be aware that the MBR will be on the
    XP
    HD and as such
    if you remove this drive your system will not boot without a W7 repair.
    Look at
    www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/8057-dual-boot-installation-windows-7-xp.html


    The other way is if your mobo BIOS supports the F12 boot menu option.
    By disconnecting all drives except the drive where you will install W7 onto
    there is no MBR change on the XP drive and you just do a normal
    installation.
    Then when W7 is up and running you reconnect the XP drive. During the boot
    process you should see a quick message to push F12 and a small window pops
    up
    where you can pick the HD to boot from.

    peter

    --
    If you find a posting or message from me offensive,inappropriate
    or disruptive,please ignore it.
    If you dont know how to ignore a posting complain
    to me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate :)

    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running XP/Sp3/IE8
    > with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
    > same
    > software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    > internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a gift
    > of
    > a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives. My
    > questions:
    >
    > If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
    > else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
    > have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
    > HDs.
    > But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    > installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that will
    > prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to get W7
    > up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of
    > my
    > 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and
    > two
    > XP systems.
    >
    > Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
    > don't
    > want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to W7
    > eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
    > capability
    > on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
    > back
    > up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
    > W7.
    >
    > Any problem with doing this?
    >
    >
     
  4. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    > "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    > news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
    >> XP/Sp3/IE8
    >> with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
    >> same
    >> software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    >> internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a gift
    >> of
    >> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives. My
    >> questions:
    >>
    >> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
    >> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
    >> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
    >> HDs.
    >> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    >> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that will
    >> prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to get
    >> W7
    >> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of
    >> my
    >> 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and
    >> two
    >> XP systems.
    >>
    >> Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
    >> don't
    >> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
    >> W7
    >> eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
    >> capability
    >> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
    >> back
    >> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
    >> W7.
    >>
    >> Any problem with doing this?



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:u2CHDrUpKHA.5328@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Peter, you said,
    >
    > "lets see if I got this right...
    > on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and therefore
    > you are dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
    > Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1
    > and
    > #2???"
    >
    > Yes, that is correct. It sounds kinda crazy but I wanted a "hot spare" on
    > the 2nd internal drive and an external spare in the event the of a
    > computer
    > failure. With HD prices at <$50 a pop it's a fairly cheap way to ensure
    > an
    > always ready backup.
    >
    > I really have no need to have a true dual boot W7/XP system. What I
    > really
    > want is 3 independent bootable systems on 3 different HDs, selectable by
    > the
    > F-12 boot menu option which my Dell computer has. Your suggestion of
    > disconnecting the #2 internal and the external HDs and loading W7 on the
    > #1
    > internal HD, then re-connecting the XP HDs sounds like it would give me
    > what
    > I'm looking for. And BTW, that's exactly what I do now -- use F-12 during
    > the boot sequence to select which of the 3 HDs to which I want to boot.
    > You
    > have given me the courage to give W7 a low risk try.
    >
    > Thanks



    bobster:
    In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
    you might want to consider...

    If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the Casper
    disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently released
    Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
    capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD assuming,
    of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
    (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that capability.)

    So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
    (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so that
    the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7 systems?
    Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
    contain the contents of both OSs.

    One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal HDD
    would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot priority
    order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple matter
    to change the boot priority order as the need arises.

    Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
    systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
    contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
    Anna
     
  5. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Anna,

    Thanks for the sage advice. Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but since my
    external HD enclosure is connected via a SATA port, the new USB boot
    capability didn't provide much usable new capability. Not a problem for me
    as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable, and I have always been able to
    boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
    port via an eSATA cable. And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
    supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive. I also
    know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.

    What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions , each
    with a new drive letter. The procedure in the XP Help and Support section
    sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.

    Thanks again for your help.

    "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    news:-O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...

    > "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    > news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
    >> XP/Sp3/IE8
    >> with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
    >> same
    >> software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    >> internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a gift
    >> of
    >> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives. My
    >> questions:
    >>
    >> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
    >> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
    >> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
    >> HDs.
    >> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    >> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that will
    >> prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to get
    >> W7
    >> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of
    >> my
    >> 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and
    >> two
    >> XP systems.
    >>
    >> Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
    >> don't
    >> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
    >> W7
    >> eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
    >> capability
    >> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
    >> back
    >> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
    >> W7.
    >>
    >> Any problem with doing this?



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:u2CHDrUpKHA.5328@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Peter, you said,
    >
    > "lets see if I got this right...
    > on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and therefore
    > you are dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
    > Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1
    > and
    > #2???"
    >
    > Yes, that is correct. It sounds kinda crazy but I wanted a "hot spare" on
    > the 2nd internal drive and an external spare in the event the of a
    > computer
    > failure. With HD prices at <$50 a pop it's a fairly cheap way to ensure
    > an
    > always ready backup.
    >
    > I really have no need to have a true dual boot W7/XP system. What I
    > really
    > want is 3 independent bootable systems on 3 different HDs, selectable by
    > the
    > F-12 boot menu option which my Dell computer has. Your suggestion of
    > disconnecting the #2 internal and the external HDs and loading W7 on the
    > #1
    > internal HD, then re-connecting the XP HDs sounds like it would give me
    > what
    > I'm looking for. And BTW, that's exactly what I do now -- use F-12 during
    > the boot sequence to select which of the 3 HDs to which I want to boot.
    > You
    > have given me the courage to give W7 a low risk try.
    >
    > Thanks



    bobster:
    In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
    you might want to consider...

    If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the Casper
    disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently released
    Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
    capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD assuming,
    of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
    (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that capability.)

    So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
    (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so that
    the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7 systems?
    Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
    contain the contents of both OSs.

    One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal HDD
    would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot priority
    order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple matter
    to change the boot priority order as the need arises.

    Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
    systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
    contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
    Anna
     
  6. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    >> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    >> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
    >>> XP/Sp3/IE8
    >>> with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
    >>> same
    >>> software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    >>> internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a gift
    >>> of
    >>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives. My
    >>> questions:
    >>>
    >>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
    >>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
    >>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
    >>> HDs.
    >>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    >>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
    >>> will
    >>> prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to get
    >>> W7
    >>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of
    >>> my
    >>> 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and
    >>> two
    >>> XP systems.
    >>>
    >>> Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
    >>> don't
    >>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
    >>> W7
    >>> eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
    >>> capability
    >>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
    >>> back
    >>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
    >>> W7.
    >>>
    >>> Any problem with doing this?



    > "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    > news:u2CHDrUpKHA.5328@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    >> Peter, you said,
    >>
    >> "lets see if I got this right...
    >> on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and
    >> therefore
    >> you are dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
    >> Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1
    >> and
    >> #2???"
    >>
    >> Yes, that is correct. It sounds kinda crazy but I wanted a "hot spare"
    >> on
    >> the 2nd internal drive and an external spare in the event the of a
    >> computer
    >> failure. With HD prices at <$50 a pop it's a fairly cheap way to ensure
    >> an
    >> always ready backup.
    >>
    >> I really have no need to have a true dual boot W7/XP system. What I
    >> really
    >> want is 3 independent bootable systems on 3 different HDs, selectable by
    >> the
    >> F-12 boot menu option which my Dell computer has. Your suggestion of
    >> disconnecting the #2 internal and the external HDs and loading W7 on the
    >> #1
    >> internal HD, then re-connecting the XP HDs sounds like it would give me
    >> what
    >> I'm looking for. And BTW, that's exactly what I do now -- use F-12
    >> during
    >> the boot sequence to select which of the 3 HDs to which I want to boot.
    >> You
    >> have given me the courage to give W7 a low risk try.
    >>
    >> Thanks



    > "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    > news:-O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > bobster:
    > In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
    > you might want to consider...
    >
    > If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the Casper
    > disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
    > released
    > Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
    > capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
    > assuming,
    > of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
    > (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
    > capability.)
    >
    > So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
    > (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so that
    > the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7 systems?
    > Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
    > contain the contents of both OSs.
    >
    > One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
    > HDD
    > would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot priority
    > order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
    > matter
    > to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
    >
    > Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
    > systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
    > contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
    > Anna



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > Anna,
    >
    > Thanks for the sage advice. Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but since
    > my
    > external HD enclosure is connected via a SATA port, the new USB boot
    > capability didn't provide much usable new capability. Not a problem for
    > me
    > as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable, and I have always been able
    > to
    > boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
    > port via an eSATA cable. And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
    > supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive. I also
    > know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
    >
    > What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
    > each
    > with a new drive letter. The procedure in the XP Help and Support section
    > sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
    >
    > Thanks again for your help.



    bobster:
    Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal situation.
    Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port it
    didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external device.
    I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in the
    desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your external
    device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.

    In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device is
    certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
    outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
    dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).

    It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk Management
    snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no difficulty
    doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
    "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the current
    partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally clone
    the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.

    If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
    cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk Management
    to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already shown
    as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click on
    the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the sub-menu.
    And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
    that the system will boot to the external disk.
    Anna
     
  7. Bill in Co.

    Bill in Co. Flightless Bird

    Anna wrote:
    >>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message


    <snip>

    > bobster:
    > Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    > (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal situation.
    > Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port it
    > didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
    > device.
    > I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
    > the
    > desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
    > external
    > device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.


    I think it does have an eSATA port already, Anna, unless I'm losing my
    memory.

    I also have a Dell Inspiron 530 Desktop, and have in the past used a Vantec
    eSATA/USB2 external HD enclosure for backup, although now I'm using a second
    *internal* SATA drive for that purpose, since its simpler and presumably
    faster (and I've been using it a fair amount just to get a clean restore
    after various software tests - otherwise I'd use an external backup).
     
  8. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    > Anna wrote:
    > <snip>
    >
    >> bobster:
    >> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    >> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal
    >> situation.
    >> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port
    >> it
    >> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
    >> device.
    >> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
    >> the
    >> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
    >> external
    >> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.



    "Bill in Co." <not_really_here@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:%23XrZRTqpKHA.1556@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > I think it does have an eSATA port already, Anna, unless I'm losing my
    > memory.
    >
    > I also have a Dell Inspiron 530 Desktop, and have in the past used a
    > Vantec eSATA/USB2 external HD enclosure for backup, although now I'm using
    > a second *internal* SATA drive for that purpose, since its simpler and
    > presumably faster (and I've been using it a fair amount just to get a
    > clean restore after various software tests - otherwise I'd use an external
    > backup).



    Bill:
    Thanks for the correction. I recall working on one of those Dell Inspiron
    530s some time ago and I didn't recall that it was equipped with an eSATA
    port. So I just assumed the OP had either installed an eSATA adapter in one
    of the PCI slots or made a direct connection from his/her SATA external
    enclosure to one of the motherboard's SATA connectors.
    Anna
     
  9. Bill in Co.

    Bill in Co. Flightless Bird

    Anna wrote:
    >> Anna wrote:
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>> bobster:
    >>> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    >>> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal
    >>> situation.
    >>> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port
    >>> it
    >>> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
    >>> device.
    >>> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
    >>> the
    >>> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
    >>> external
    >>> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.

    >
    >
    > "Bill in Co." <not_really_here@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    > news:%23XrZRTqpKHA.1556@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> I think it does have an eSATA port already, Anna, unless I'm losing my
    >> memory.
    >>
    >> I also have a Dell Inspiron 530 Desktop, and have in the past used a
    >> Vantec eSATA/USB2 external HD enclosure for backup, although now I'm
    >> using
    >> a second *internal* SATA drive for that purpose, since its simpler and
    >> presumably faster (and I've been using it a fair amount just to get a
    >> clean restore after various software tests - otherwise I'd use an
    >> external
    >> backup).

    >
    >
    > Bill:
    > Thanks for the correction. I recall working on one of those Dell Inspiron
    > 530s some time ago and I didn't recall that it was equipped with an eSATA
    > port. So I just assumed the OP had either installed an eSATA adapter in
    > one
    > of the PCI slots or made a direct connection from his/her SATA external
    > enclosure to one of the motherboard's SATA connectors.
    > Anna


    Well, in retrospect, my memory might be off, and maybe I put in a bracket
    (with the connector) that came with the Vantec enclosure kit - now I'm not
    so sure. Old age may be setting in. :) Maybe bobster can clarify it.
    Since I'm only now using the second internal SATA drive as a backup, I can't
    recall for sure.
     
  10. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Anna,

    Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
    bought the full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
    rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD. The other end
    connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board. I've never
    had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
    capable Vantec external enclosure.

    I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have been
    discussing. As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
    position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one. They each have
    been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have 3
    partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
    destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2 or
    more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
    size of the drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper will
    probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either internal
    drive to a partition on the external drive. If that happens I would
    probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
    re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.

    I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive formatting,
    but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
    re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for XP
    and Windows 7. Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
    configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to the
    Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320 g
    WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with XP/IE-8
    on it) to this HD. This sounds complicated but I can change a drive in the
    Vantec in about 5 minutes.

    I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as there
    is no hurry to do anything.

    Any additional comments will be appreciated.


    "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...

    >> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    >> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
    >>> XP/Sp3/IE8
    >>> with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
    >>> same
    >>> software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    >>> internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a gift
    >>> of
    >>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives. My
    >>> questions:
    >>>
    >>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
    >>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
    >>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
    >>> HDs.
    >>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    >>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
    >>> will
    >>> prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to get
    >>> W7
    >>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of
    >>> my
    >>> 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and
    >>> two
    >>> XP systems.
    >>>
    >>> Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
    >>> don't
    >>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
    >>> W7
    >>> eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
    >>> capability
    >>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
    >>> back
    >>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
    >>> W7.
    >>>
    >>> Any problem with doing this?



    > "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    > news:u2CHDrUpKHA.5328@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    >> Peter, you said,
    >>
    >> "lets see if I got this right...
    >> on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and
    >> therefore
    >> you are dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
    >> Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1
    >> and
    >> #2???"
    >>
    >> Yes, that is correct. It sounds kinda crazy but I wanted a "hot spare"
    >> on
    >> the 2nd internal drive and an external spare in the event the of a
    >> computer
    >> failure. With HD prices at <$50 a pop it's a fairly cheap way to ensure
    >> an
    >> always ready backup.
    >>
    >> I really have no need to have a true dual boot W7/XP system. What I
    >> really
    >> want is 3 independent bootable systems on 3 different HDs, selectable by
    >> the
    >> F-12 boot menu option which my Dell computer has. Your suggestion of
    >> disconnecting the #2 internal and the external HDs and loading W7 on the
    >> #1
    >> internal HD, then re-connecting the XP HDs sounds like it would give me
    >> what
    >> I'm looking for. And BTW, that's exactly what I do now -- use F-12
    >> during
    >> the boot sequence to select which of the 3 HDs to which I want to boot.
    >> You
    >> have given me the courage to give W7 a low risk try.
    >>
    >> Thanks



    > "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    > news:-O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > bobster:
    > In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
    > you might want to consider...
    >
    > If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the Casper
    > disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
    > released
    > Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
    > capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
    > assuming,
    > of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
    > (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
    > capability.)
    >
    > So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
    > (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so that
    > the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7 systems?
    > Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
    > contain the contents of both OSs.
    >
    > One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
    > HDD
    > would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot priority
    > order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
    > matter
    > to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
    >
    > Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
    > systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
    > contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
    > Anna



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > Anna,
    >
    > Thanks for the sage advice. Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but since
    > my
    > external HD enclosure is connected via a SATA port, the new USB boot
    > capability didn't provide much usable new capability. Not a problem for
    > me
    > as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable, and I have always been able
    > to
    > boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
    > port via an eSATA cable. And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
    > supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive. I also
    > know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
    >
    > What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
    > each
    > with a new drive letter. The procedure in the XP Help and Support section
    > sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
    >
    > Thanks again for your help.



    bobster:
    Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal situation.
    Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port it
    didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external device.
    I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in the
    desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your external
    device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.

    In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device is
    certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
    outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
    dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).

    It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk Management
    snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no difficulty
    doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
    "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the current
    partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally clone
    the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.

    If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
    cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk Management
    to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already shown
    as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click on
    the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the sub-menu.
    And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
    that the system will boot to the external disk.
    Anna
     
  11. 20100205

    20100205 Flightless Bird

    "Bill in Co." wrote:
    >
    > Well, in retrospect, my memory might be off, and maybe I put in a bracket
    > (with the connector) that came with the Vantec enclosure kit - now I'm not
    > so sure. Old age may be setting in. :) Maybe bobster can clarify it.
    > Since I'm only now using the second internal SATA drive as a backup, I can't
    > recall for sure.


    Perhaps it is time to join the Geriatric Society of United States where
    you can meet fellow geriatric Pig-Bear.
     
  12. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Bill,

    See my last post to Anna regarding my "as delivered" Inspiron 530
    configuration. The first WD 320g HD I bought was the full kit and contained
    the eSATA cable and rear adapter/connector. The other identical HDs were
    bought as "bare drives" which go for as little as $40 and come with nothing
    but the drive.

    And, BTW, thanks for your comments as well as those from Peter.

    ===========================================
    "Bill in Co." <not_really_here@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:-O9SMQzrpKHA.1544@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    Anna wrote:
    >> Anna wrote:
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>> bobster:
    >>> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    >>> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal
    >>> situation.
    >>> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port
    >>> it
    >>> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
    >>> device.
    >>> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
    >>> the
    >>> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
    >>> external
    >>> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.

    >
    >
    > "Bill in Co." <not_really_here@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    > news:%23XrZRTqpKHA.1556@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> I think it does have an eSATA port already, Anna, unless I'm losing my
    >> memory.
    >>
    >> I also have a Dell Inspiron 530 Desktop, and have in the past used a
    >> Vantec eSATA/USB2 external HD enclosure for backup, although now I'm
    >> using
    >> a second *internal* SATA drive for that purpose, since its simpler and
    >> presumably faster (and I've been using it a fair amount just to get a
    >> clean restore after various software tests - otherwise I'd use an
    >> external
    >> backup).

    >
    >
    > Bill:
    > Thanks for the correction. I recall working on one of those Dell Inspiron
    > 530s some time ago and I didn't recall that it was equipped with an eSATA
    > port. So I just assumed the OP had either installed an eSATA adapter in
    > one
    > of the PCI slots or made a direct connection from his/her SATA external
    > enclosure to one of the motherboard's SATA connectors.
    > Anna


    Well, in retrospect, my memory might be off, and maybe I put in a bracket
    (with the connector) that came with the Vantec enclosure kit - now I'm not
    so sure. Old age may be setting in. :) Maybe bobster can clarify it.
    Since I'm only now using the second internal SATA drive as a backup, I can't
    recall for sure.
     
  13. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    >>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
    >>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
    >>>> with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
    >>>> same
    >>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    >>>> internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a
    >>>> gift
    >>>> of
    >>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives. My
    >>>> questions:
    >>>>
    >>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and
    >>>> everything
    >>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will
    >>>> still
    >>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
    >>>> HDs.
    >>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    >>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
    >>>> will
    >>>> prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to get
    >>>> W7
    >>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one
    >>>> of
    >>>> my
    >>>> 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system
    >>>> and
    >>>> two
    >>>> XP systems.
    >>>>
    >>>> Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
    >>>> don't
    >>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
    >>>> W7
    >>>> eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
    >>>> capability
    >>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
    >>>> back
    >>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
    >>>> W7.
    >>>>
    >>>> Any problem with doing this?



    >> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    >> news:-O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> bobster:
    >> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
    >> you might want to consider...
    >>
    >> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the
    >> Casper
    >> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
    >> released
    >> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
    >> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
    >> assuming,
    >> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
    >> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
    >> capability.)
    >>
    >> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
    >> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so
    >> that
    >> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7
    >> systems?
    >> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
    >> contain the contents of both OSs.
    >>
    >> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
    >> HDD
    >> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot
    >> priority
    >> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
    >> matter
    >> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
    >>
    >> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
    >> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
    >> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
    >> Anna

    >
    >
    > "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    > news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> Anna,
    >>
    >> Thanks for the sage advice. Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but since
    >> my
    >> external HD enclosure is connected via a SATA port, the new USB boot
    >> capability didn't provide much usable new capability. Not a problem for
    >> me
    >> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable, and I have always been able
    >> to
    >> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
    >> port via an eSATA cable. And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
    >> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive. I
    >> also
    >> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
    >>
    >> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
    >> each
    >> with a new drive letter. The procedure in the XP Help and Support
    >> section
    >> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
    >>
    >> Thanks again for your help.



    > "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    > news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...


    > bobster:
    > Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    > (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal situation.
    > Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port it
    > didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
    > device.
    > I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
    > the
    > desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
    > external
    > device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
    >
    > In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device
    > is
    > certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
    > outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
    > dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).
    >
    > It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk Management
    > snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no difficulty
    > doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
    > "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the
    > current
    > partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally
    > clone
    > the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.
    >
    > If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
    > cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk
    > Management
    > to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already
    > shown
    > as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click on
    > the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the sub-menu.
    > And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
    > that the system will boot to the external disk.
    > Anna



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:u0uYf$rpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Anna,
    >
    > Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
    > bought the full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
    > rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD. The other end
    > connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board. I've never
    > had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
    > capable Vantec external enclosure.
    >
    > I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have been
    > discussing. As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
    > position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one. They each
    > have
    > been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have
    > 3
    > partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
    > destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2
    > or
    > more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
    > size of the drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper
    > will
    > probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either
    > internal
    > drive to a partition on the external drive. If that happens I would
    > probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
    > re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.
    >
    > I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive formatting,
    > but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
    > re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for XP
    > and Windows 7. Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
    > configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to
    > the
    > Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320
    > g
    > WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with
    > XP/IE-8
    > on it) to this HD. This sounds complicated but I can change a drive in
    > the
    > Vantec in about 5 minutes.
    >
    > I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as
    > there
    > is no hurry to do anything.
    >
    > Any additional comments will be appreciated.



    bobster:
    It seems to me that the most straightforward & efficient configuration in
    your situation based upon your objective of working with two different
    operating systems and having at your disposal two internal HDDs plus an
    external HDD is to...
    1. Install the XP system on one internal HDD.
    2. Install the Win7 system on the other internal HDD.
    3. Utilize your external HDD as the "destination" HDD, and use your Casper
    disk-cloning program as the vehicle to contain the cloned contents of each
    of the two internal HDDs. As I previously indicated you would
    multi-partition the external HDD into two partitions to accommodate the
    cloned contents of each OS.

    Naturally this assumes that the 320 GB external HDD you're working with
    contains sufficient disk space to contain those cloned contents. You haven't
    indicated the total amount of data you're working with in each of those two
    systems but I'm assuming each of the external drive's partitions you create
    would be sufficient in size to accommodate the cloned contents of that
    particular OS. Is that a reasonable assumption?

    I'm also assuming each of your two internal HDDs will be single-partitioned.
    Given the configuration I'm suggesting I see no reason to multi-partition
    these drives.

    Forget about drive letter assignments re the external HDD. They are of *no*
    relevance in this situation. The same is true of your internal HDDs. As an
    example...

    Let's say your XP OS is installed on internal HDD #1 and your Win7 OS is
    installed on internal HDD #2. Now you decide to boot to your XP OS. Assuming
    the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to HDD #1 the system
    will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive letter
    assignment.

    Since your second internal HDD containing the Win7 is also connected as a
    secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: drive letter
    assignment. Again the drive letter assigned to that drive during this
    operation is of no consequence based upon what we are discussing.

    Let's say at another time you now desire to boot to your Win7 OS. Assuming
    the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your HDD #2, the
    system will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive
    letter assignment. Since your first internal HDD containing the XP OS is
    also connected as a secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C:
    drive letter assignment. Again, the drive letter assigned to that drive,
    i.e., "HDD #1" during this operation is of no consequence based upon what we
    are discussing.

    And so on & so on...

    Now let's say that while you've booted to your XP OS ("HDD #1"), you decide
    to clone the contents of that drive to one of the two partitions you
    previously created on your external HDD. Understand that when you originally
    multi-partitioned that external HDD into two partitions the drive letters
    assigned to each of those partitions is of no consequence in terms of our
    present discussion except in "telling" Casper which partition should act as
    the destination drive for the purposes of receiving the cloned contents of
    your HDD #1. Let's say, as an example, you will be cloning the contents of
    that drive to the F: partition on the external HDD, the other partition
    having been assigned the G: drive letter assignment.

    You will use the same basic process to clone the contents of your Win7 OS
    contained on internal HDD #2, but this time using the "G:" partition as the
    recipient of those cloned contents.

    So now you have your external HDD containing the cloned contents of your XP
    & Win7 systems. The fact that the two partitions on the external HDD have
    been designated F: & G: are really of no relevance here. Since your external
    HDD is a bootable device you will be able to boot to either of the OSs
    contained on the external HDD. Let's say you desire to boot to the cloned XP
    OS contained on partition F:. (As I previously indicated you will have to
    first ensure that the selected partition is marked "Active"; I previously
    explained that simple process using Disk Management) . Then ensure that the
    BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
    The system will then boot to the cloned XP OS on your external HDD and
    receive a C: drive letter assignment. The partition containing the cloned
    Win7 OS will receive a non-C: letter assignment, possibly retaining the G:
    drive letter assignment. In any event the drive letter assigned to the
    latter partition is of no relevance re our discussion.

    Once again, you would follow the same basic process should you desire to
    boot to the cloned Win7 OS on the external HDD. Again ensuring that the
    partition containing that OS is marked "Active" and the BIOS boot priority
    order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.

    Obviously there are different approaches one can take to meet your
    objectives but as I stated I believe the approach I'm suggesting is a
    sensible one under your circumstances.
    Anna
     
  14. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Anna,

    Thanks again for clarifying several things that were bothering me regarding
    the use of the external drive in a multi partition mode. Since I haven't
    downloaded the Windows 7 OS yet, I don't know its footprint size. The XP
    installation is about 40 gigs including all of my apps so I would guess that
    the W7 installation sans apps would be less than that. I would think that 3
    80 gig partitions on the external drive would be about right. I will let
    you know how it works out when I finally decide to tackle it.

    ================================================================
    "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    news:-OYKd2EupKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...

    >>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
    >>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
    >>>> with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
    >>>> same
    >>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    >>>> internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a
    >>>> gift
    >>>> of
    >>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives. My
    >>>> questions:
    >>>>
    >>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and
    >>>> everything
    >>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will
    >>>> still
    >>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
    >>>> HDs.
    >>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    >>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
    >>>> will
    >>>> prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to get
    >>>> W7
    >>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one
    >>>> of
    >>>> my
    >>>> 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system
    >>>> and
    >>>> two
    >>>> XP systems.
    >>>>
    >>>> Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
    >>>> don't
    >>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
    >>>> W7
    >>>> eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
    >>>> capability
    >>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
    >>>> back
    >>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
    >>>> W7.
    >>>>
    >>>> Any problem with doing this?



    >> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    >> news:-O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> bobster:
    >> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
    >> you might want to consider...
    >>
    >> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the
    >> Casper
    >> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
    >> released
    >> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
    >> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
    >> assuming,
    >> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
    >> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
    >> capability.)
    >>
    >> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
    >> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so
    >> that
    >> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7
    >> systems?
    >> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
    >> contain the contents of both OSs.
    >>
    >> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
    >> HDD
    >> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot
    >> priority
    >> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
    >> matter
    >> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
    >>
    >> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
    >> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
    >> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
    >> Anna

    >
    >
    > "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    > news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> Anna,
    >>
    >> Thanks for the sage advice. Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but since
    >> my
    >> external HD enclosure is connected via a SATA port, the new USB boot
    >> capability didn't provide much usable new capability. Not a problem for
    >> me
    >> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable, and I have always been able
    >> to
    >> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
    >> port via an eSATA cable. And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
    >> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive. I
    >> also
    >> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
    >>
    >> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
    >> each
    >> with a new drive letter. The procedure in the XP Help and Support
    >> section
    >> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
    >>
    >> Thanks again for your help.



    > "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    > news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...


    > bobster:
    > Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    > (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal situation.
    > Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port it
    > didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
    > device.
    > I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
    > the
    > desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
    > external
    > device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
    >
    > In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device
    > is
    > certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
    > outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
    > dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).
    >
    > It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk Management
    > snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no difficulty
    > doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
    > "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the
    > current
    > partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally
    > clone
    > the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.
    >
    > If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
    > cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk
    > Management
    > to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already
    > shown
    > as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click on
    > the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the sub-menu.
    > And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
    > that the system will boot to the external disk.
    > Anna



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:u0uYf$rpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Anna,
    >
    > Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
    > bought the full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
    > rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD. The other end
    > connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board. I've never
    > had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
    > capable Vantec external enclosure.
    >
    > I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have been
    > discussing. As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
    > position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one. They each
    > have
    > been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have
    > 3
    > partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
    > destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2
    > or
    > more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
    > size of the drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper
    > will
    > probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either
    > internal
    > drive to a partition on the external drive. If that happens I would
    > probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
    > re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.
    >
    > I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive formatting,
    > but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
    > re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for XP
    > and Windows 7. Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
    > configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to
    > the
    > Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320
    > g
    > WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with
    > XP/IE-8
    > on it) to this HD. This sounds complicated but I can change a drive in
    > the
    > Vantec in about 5 minutes.
    >
    > I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as
    > there
    > is no hurry to do anything.
    >
    > Any additional comments will be appreciated.



    bobster:
    It seems to me that the most straightforward & efficient configuration in
    your situation based upon your objective of working with two different
    operating systems and having at your disposal two internal HDDs plus an
    external HDD is to...
    1. Install the XP system on one internal HDD.
    2. Install the Win7 system on the other internal HDD.
    3. Utilize your external HDD as the "destination" HDD, and use your Casper
    disk-cloning program as the vehicle to contain the cloned contents of each
    of the two internal HDDs. As I previously indicated you would
    multi-partition the external HDD into two partitions to accommodate the
    cloned contents of each OS.

    Naturally this assumes that the 320 GB external HDD you're working with
    contains sufficient disk space to contain those cloned contents. You haven't
    indicated the total amount of data you're working with in each of those two
    systems but I'm assuming each of the external drive's partitions you create
    would be sufficient in size to accommodate the cloned contents of that
    particular OS. Is that a reasonable assumption?

    I'm also assuming each of your two internal HDDs will be single-partitioned.
    Given the configuration I'm suggesting I see no reason to multi-partition
    these drives.

    Forget about drive letter assignments re the external HDD. They are of *no*
    relevance in this situation. The same is true of your internal HDDs. As an
    example...

    Let's say your XP OS is installed on internal HDD #1 and your Win7 OS is
    installed on internal HDD #2. Now you decide to boot to your XP OS. Assuming
    the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to HDD #1 the system
    will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive letter
    assignment.

    Since your second internal HDD containing the Win7 is also connected as a
    secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: drive letter
    assignment. Again the drive letter assigned to that drive during this
    operation is of no consequence based upon what we are discussing.

    Let's say at another time you now desire to boot to your Win7 OS. Assuming
    the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your HDD #2, the
    system will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive
    letter assignment. Since your first internal HDD containing the XP OS is
    also connected as a secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C:
    drive letter assignment. Again, the drive letter assigned to that drive,
    i.e., "HDD #1" during this operation is of no consequence based upon what we
    are discussing.

    And so on & so on...

    Now let's say that while you've booted to your XP OS ("HDD #1"), you decide
    to clone the contents of that drive to one of the two partitions you
    previously created on your external HDD. Understand that when you originally
    multi-partitioned that external HDD into two partitions the drive letters
    assigned to each of those partitions is of no consequence in terms of our
    present discussion except in "telling" Casper which partition should act as
    the destination drive for the purposes of receiving the cloned contents of
    your HDD #1. Let's say, as an example, you will be cloning the contents of
    that drive to the F: partition on the external HDD, the other partition
    having been assigned the G: drive letter assignment.

    You will use the same basic process to clone the contents of your Win7 OS
    contained on internal HDD #2, but this time using the "G:" partition as the
    recipient of those cloned contents.

    So now you have your external HDD containing the cloned contents of your XP
    & Win7 systems. The fact that the two partitions on the external HDD have
    been designated F: & G: are really of no relevance here. Since your external
    HDD is a bootable device you will be able to boot to either of the OSs
    contained on the external HDD. Let's say you desire to boot to the cloned XP
    OS contained on partition F:. (As I previously indicated you will have to
    first ensure that the selected partition is marked "Active"; I previously
    explained that simple process using Disk Management) . Then ensure that the
    BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
    The system will then boot to the cloned XP OS on your external HDD and
    receive a C: drive letter assignment. The partition containing the cloned
    Win7 OS will receive a non-C: letter assignment, possibly retaining the G:
    drive letter assignment. In any event the drive letter assigned to the
    latter partition is of no relevance re our discussion.

    Once again, you would follow the same basic process should you desire to
    boot to the cloned Win7 OS on the external HDD. Again ensuring that the
    partition containing that OS is marked "Active" and the BIOS boot priority
    order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.

    Obviously there are different approaches one can take to meet your
    objectives but as I stated I believe the approach I'm suggesting is a
    sensible one under your circumstances.
    Anna
     
  15. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    >>>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    >>>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
    >>>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
    >>>>> with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to
    >>>>> the
    >>>>> same
    >>>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    >>>>> internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a
    >>>>> gift
    >>>>> of
    >>>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.
    >>>>> My
    >>>>> questions:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and
    >>>>> everything
    >>>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will
    >>>>> still
    >>>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
    >>>>> HDs.
    >>>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    >>>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
    >>>>> will
    >>>>> prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to
    >>>>> get
    >>>>> W7
    >>>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one
    >>>>> of
    >>>>> my
    >>>>> 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system
    >>>>> and
    >>>>> two
    >>>>> XP systems.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
    >>>>> don't
    >>>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch
    >>>>> to
    >>>>> W7
    >>>>> eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
    >>>>> capability
    >>>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
    >>>>> back
    >>>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable
    >>>>> with
    >>>>> W7.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any problem with doing this?



    >>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:-O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>> bobster:
    >>> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another
    >>> option
    >>> you might want to consider...
    >>>
    >>> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the
    >>> Casper
    >>> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
    >>> released
    >>> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
    >>> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
    >>> assuming,
    >>> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as
    >>> well.
    >>> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
    >>> capability.)
    >>>
    >>> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the
    >>> extent
    >>> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so
    >>> that
    >>> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7
    >>> systems?
    >>> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
    >>> contain the contents of both OSs.
    >>>
    >>> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
    >>> HDD
    >>> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot
    >>> priority
    >>> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
    >>> matter
    >>> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
    >>>
    >>> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
    >>> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
    >>> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
    >>> Anna



    >> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    >> news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>> Anna,
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the sage advice. Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but
    >>> since
    >>> my
    >>> external HD enclosure is connected via a SATA port, the new USB boot
    >>> capability didn't provide much usable new capability. Not a problem for
    >>> me
    >>> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable, and I have always been
    >>> able
    >>> to
    >>> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
    >>> port via an eSATA cable. And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
    >>> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive. I
    >>> also
    >>> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
    >>>
    >>> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
    >>> each
    >>> with a new drive letter. The procedure in the XP Help and Support
    >>> section
    >>> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks again for your help.



    >> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    >> news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> bobster:
    >> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    >> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal
    >> situation.
    >> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port
    >> it
    >> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
    >> device.
    >> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
    >> the
    >> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
    >> external
    >> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
    >>
    >> In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device
    >> is
    >> certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
    >> outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
    >> dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).
    >>
    >> It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk
    >> Management
    >> snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no
    >> difficulty
    >> doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
    >> "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the
    >> current
    >> partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally
    >> clone
    >> the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.
    >>
    >> If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
    >> cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk
    >> Management
    >> to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already
    >> shown
    >> as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click
    >> on
    >> the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the
    >> sub-menu.
    >> And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
    >> that the system will boot to the external disk.
    >> Anna

    >
    >
    > "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    > news:u0uYf$rpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> Anna,
    >>
    >> Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
    >> bought the full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
    >> rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD. The other end
    >> connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board. I've never
    >> had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
    >> capable Vantec external enclosure.
    >>
    >> I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have
    >> been
    >> discussing. As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
    >> position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one. They each
    >> have
    >> been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have
    >> 3
    >> partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
    >> destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2
    >> or
    >> more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
    >> size of the drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper
    >> will
    >> probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either
    >> internal
    >> drive to a partition on the external drive. If that happens I would
    >> probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
    >> re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.
    >>
    >> I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive
    >> formatting,
    >> but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
    >> re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for
    >> XP
    >> and Windows 7. Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
    >> configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to
    >> the
    >> Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320
    >> g
    >> WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with
    >> XP/IE-8
    >> on it) to this HD. This sounds complicated but I can change a drive in
    >> the
    >> Vantec in about 5 minutes.
    >>
    >> I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as
    >> there
    >> is no hurry to do anything.
    >>
    >> Any additional comments will be appreciated.



    > "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    > news:-OYKd2EupKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > bobster:
    > It seems to me that the most straightforward & efficient configuration in
    > your situation based upon your objective of working with two different
    > operating systems and having at your disposal two internal HDDs plus an
    > external HDD is to...
    > 1. Install the XP system on one internal HDD.
    > 2. Install the Win7 system on the other internal HDD.
    > 3. Utilize your external HDD as the "destination" HDD, and use your Casper
    > disk-cloning program as the vehicle to contain the cloned contents of each
    > of the two internal HDDs. As I previously indicated you would
    > multi-partition the external HDD into two partitions to accommodate the
    > cloned contents of each OS.
    >
    > Naturally this assumes that the 320 GB external HDD you're working with
    > contains sufficient disk space to contain those cloned contents. You
    > haven't
    > indicated the total amount of data you're working with in each of those
    > two
    > systems but I'm assuming each of the external drive's partitions you
    > create
    > would be sufficient in size to accommodate the cloned contents of that
    > particular OS. Is that a reasonable assumption?
    >
    > I'm also assuming each of your two internal HDDs will be
    > single-partitioned.
    > Given the configuration I'm suggesting I see no reason to multi-partition
    > these drives.
    >
    > Forget about drive letter assignments re the external HDD. They are of
    > *no*
    > relevance in this situation. The same is true of your internal HDDs. As an
    > example...
    >
    > Let's say your XP OS is installed on internal HDD #1 and your Win7 OS is
    > installed on internal HDD #2. Now you decide to boot to your XP OS.
    > Assuming
    > the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to HDD #1 the
    > system
    > will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive letter
    > assignment.
    >
    > Since your second internal HDD containing the Win7 is also connected as a
    > secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: drive letter
    > assignment. Again the drive letter assigned to that drive during this
    > operation is of no consequence based upon what we are discussing.
    >
    > Let's say at another time you now desire to boot to your Win7 OS. Assuming
    > the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your HDD #2,
    > the
    > system will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive
    > letter assignment. Since your first internal HDD containing the XP OS is
    > also connected as a secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C:
    > drive letter assignment. Again, the drive letter assigned to that drive,
    > i.e., "HDD #1" during this operation is of no consequence based upon what
    > we
    > are discussing.
    >
    > And so on & so on...
    >
    > Now let's say that while you've booted to your XP OS ("HDD #1"), you
    > decide
    > to clone the contents of that drive to one of the two partitions you
    > previously created on your external HDD. Understand that when you
    > originally
    > multi-partitioned that external HDD into two partitions the drive letters
    > assigned to each of those partitions is of no consequence in terms of our
    > present discussion except in "telling" Casper which partition should act
    > as
    > the destination drive for the purposes of receiving the cloned contents of
    > your HDD #1. Let's say, as an example, you will be cloning the contents of
    > that drive to the F: partition on the external HDD, the other partition
    > having been assigned the G: drive letter assignment.
    >
    > You will use the same basic process to clone the contents of your Win7 OS
    > contained on internal HDD #2, but this time using the "G:" partition as
    > the
    > recipient of those cloned contents.
    >
    > So now you have your external HDD containing the cloned contents of your
    > XP
    > & Win7 systems. The fact that the two partitions on the external HDD have
    > been designated F: & G: are really of no relevance here. Since your
    > external
    > HDD is a bootable device you will be able to boot to either of the OSs
    > contained on the external HDD. Let's say you desire to boot to the cloned
    > XP
    > OS contained on partition F:. (As I previously indicated you will have to
    > first ensure that the selected partition is marked "Active"; I previously
    > explained that simple process using Disk Management) . Then ensure that
    > the
    > BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
    > The system will then boot to the cloned XP OS on your external HDD and
    > receive a C: drive letter assignment. The partition containing the cloned
    > Win7 OS will receive a non-C: letter assignment, possibly retaining the G:
    > drive letter assignment. In any event the drive letter assigned to the
    > latter partition is of no relevance re our discussion.
    >
    > Once again, you would follow the same basic process should you desire to
    > boot to the cloned Win7 OS on the external HDD. Again ensuring that the
    > partition containing that OS is marked "Active" and the BIOS boot priority
    > order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
    >
    > Obviously there are different approaches one can take to meet your
    > objectives but as I stated I believe the approach I'm suggesting is a
    > sensible one under your circumstances.
    > Anna



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:ei4HZTupKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Anna,
    >
    > Thanks again for clarifying several things that were bothering me
    > regarding
    > the use of the external drive in a multi partition mode. Since I haven't
    > downloaded the Windows 7 OS yet, I don't know its footprint size. The XP
    > installation is about 40 gigs including all of my apps so I would guess
    > that
    > the W7 installation sans apps would be less than that. I would think that
    > 3
    > 80 gig partitions on the external drive would be about right. I will let
    > you know how it works out when I finally decide to tackle it.



    bobster:
    Well give the configuration I've suggested a try and see how it works out
    for you. If after working with it you're dissatisfied with that approach,
    then simply try another configuration possibly along the lines you
    previously contemplated. Nearly needless to say you will be sure of course
    to maintain comprehensive backups of your system(s) when making any
    significant changes.

    I'm not clear on why you would want to create *three* partitions on your
    external HDD rather than two. Certainly there would be no problem or harm in
    doing so since you've indicated you're working with total data roughly
    approximating 40 GB in each of the two OSs so since you'll be working with a
    320 GB HDD it would seem there's plenty of disk space to accommodate both of
    the OSs. I suppose you're contemplating using the third partition to contain
    other data of one sort or another.

    But whatever you decide it would be interesting to later hear from you as to
    how things worked out.
    Anna
     
  16. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Anna,

    Last night I was able to successfully partition my Vantec mounted HD into 3
    volumes of approximately 80g each with the remaining space left un-
    partitioned. These 3 new partitions each have a new drive letter assigned.
    I used Casper to clone the "C" drive volume of my active drive to one of the
    "new" partitions on the external Vantec mounted drive. I then was able to
    successfully boot my XP system from that drive. As you guessed, It is my
    intent to use the three partitions as XP and Win7 backups and the third
    partition for general storage such as pictures, etc.


    BTW, I used a free partitioning utility, EASUS Partition Master 5.0.1, to
    partition the external drive. It was easy to use and did the job with a
    minimum of fuss.

    My next task will be to install Win 7 on my second internal HD. I'll
    probably tackle that in the next few days. I'll let you know the result. I
    have run the Windows 7 upgrade advisor from MS and with a few minor
    exceptions, it looks like I am good to go.

    ===========================================================
    "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    news:ejwFma0pKHA.5840@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...

    >>>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    >>>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
    >>>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
    >>>>> with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to
    >>>>> the
    >>>>> same
    >>>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    >>>>> internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a
    >>>>> gift
    >>>>> of
    >>>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.
    >>>>> My
    >>>>> questions:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and
    >>>>> everything
    >>>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will
    >>>>> still
    >>>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
    >>>>> HDs.
    >>>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    >>>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
    >>>>> will
    >>>>> prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to
    >>>>> get
    >>>>> W7
    >>>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one
    >>>>> of
    >>>>> my
    >>>>> 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system
    >>>>> and
    >>>>> two
    >>>>> XP systems.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
    >>>>> don't
    >>>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch
    >>>>> to
    >>>>> W7
    >>>>> eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
    >>>>> capability
    >>>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
    >>>>> back
    >>>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable
    >>>>> with
    >>>>> W7.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any problem with doing this?



    >>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:-O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>> bobster:
    >>> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another
    >>> option
    >>> you might want to consider...
    >>>
    >>> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the
    >>> Casper
    >>> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
    >>> released
    >>> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
    >>> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
    >>> assuming,
    >>> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as
    >>> well.
    >>> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
    >>> capability.)
    >>>
    >>> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the
    >>> extent
    >>> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so
    >>> that
    >>> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7
    >>> systems?
    >>> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
    >>> contain the contents of both OSs.
    >>>
    >>> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
    >>> HDD
    >>> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot
    >>> priority
    >>> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
    >>> matter
    >>> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
    >>>
    >>> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
    >>> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
    >>> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
    >>> Anna



    >> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    >> news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>> Anna,
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the sage advice. Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but
    >>> since
    >>> my
    >>> external HD enclosure is connected via a SATA port, the new USB boot
    >>> capability didn't provide much usable new capability. Not a problem for
    >>> me
    >>> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable, and I have always been
    >>> able
    >>> to
    >>> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
    >>> port via an eSATA cable. And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
    >>> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive. I
    >>> also
    >>> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
    >>>
    >>> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
    >>> each
    >>> with a new drive letter. The procedure in the XP Help and Support
    >>> section
    >>> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks again for your help.



    >> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    >> news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> bobster:
    >> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    >> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal
    >> situation.
    >> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port
    >> it
    >> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
    >> device.
    >> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
    >> the
    >> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
    >> external
    >> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
    >>
    >> In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device
    >> is
    >> certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
    >> outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
    >> dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).
    >>
    >> It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk
    >> Management
    >> snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no
    >> difficulty
    >> doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
    >> "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the
    >> current
    >> partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally
    >> clone
    >> the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.
    >>
    >> If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
    >> cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk
    >> Management
    >> to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already
    >> shown
    >> as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click
    >> on
    >> the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the
    >> sub-menu.
    >> And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
    >> that the system will boot to the external disk.
    >> Anna

    >
    >
    > "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    > news:u0uYf$rpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> Anna,
    >>
    >> Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
    >> bought the full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
    >> rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD. The other end
    >> connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board. I've never
    >> had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
    >> capable Vantec external enclosure.
    >>
    >> I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have
    >> been
    >> discussing. As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
    >> position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one. They each
    >> have
    >> been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have
    >> 3
    >> partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
    >> destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2
    >> or
    >> more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
    >> size of the drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper
    >> will
    >> probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either
    >> internal
    >> drive to a partition on the external drive. If that happens I would
    >> probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
    >> re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.
    >>
    >> I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive
    >> formatting,
    >> but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
    >> re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for
    >> XP
    >> and Windows 7. Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
    >> configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to
    >> the
    >> Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320
    >> g
    >> WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with
    >> XP/IE-8
    >> on it) to this HD. This sounds complicated but I can change a drive in
    >> the
    >> Vantec in about 5 minutes.
    >>
    >> I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as
    >> there
    >> is no hurry to do anything.
    >>
    >> Any additional comments will be appreciated.



    > "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    > news:-OYKd2EupKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > bobster:
    > It seems to me that the most straightforward & efficient configuration in
    > your situation based upon your objective of working with two different
    > operating systems and having at your disposal two internal HDDs plus an
    > external HDD is to...
    > 1. Install the XP system on one internal HDD.
    > 2. Install the Win7 system on the other internal HDD.
    > 3. Utilize your external HDD as the "destination" HDD, and use your Casper
    > disk-cloning program as the vehicle to contain the cloned contents of each
    > of the two internal HDDs. As I previously indicated you would
    > multi-partition the external HDD into two partitions to accommodate the
    > cloned contents of each OS.
    >
    > Naturally this assumes that the 320 GB external HDD you're working with
    > contains sufficient disk space to contain those cloned contents. You
    > haven't
    > indicated the total amount of data you're working with in each of those
    > two
    > systems but I'm assuming each of the external drive's partitions you
    > create
    > would be sufficient in size to accommodate the cloned contents of that
    > particular OS. Is that a reasonable assumption?
    >
    > I'm also assuming each of your two internal HDDs will be
    > single-partitioned.
    > Given the configuration I'm suggesting I see no reason to multi-partition
    > these drives.
    >
    > Forget about drive letter assignments re the external HDD. They are of
    > *no*
    > relevance in this situation. The same is true of your internal HDDs. As an
    > example...
    >
    > Let's say your XP OS is installed on internal HDD #1 and your Win7 OS is
    > installed on internal HDD #2. Now you decide to boot to your XP OS.
    > Assuming
    > the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to HDD #1 the
    > system
    > will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive letter
    > assignment.
    >
    > Since your second internal HDD containing the Win7 is also connected as a
    > secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: drive letter
    > assignment. Again the drive letter assigned to that drive during this
    > operation is of no consequence based upon what we are discussing.
    >
    > Let's say at another time you now desire to boot to your Win7 OS. Assuming
    > the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your HDD #2,
    > the
    > system will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive
    > letter assignment. Since your first internal HDD containing the XP OS is
    > also connected as a secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C:
    > drive letter assignment. Again, the drive letter assigned to that drive,
    > i.e., "HDD #1" during this operation is of no consequence based upon what
    > we
    > are discussing.
    >
    > And so on & so on...
    >
    > Now let's say that while you've booted to your XP OS ("HDD #1"), you
    > decide
    > to clone the contents of that drive to one of the two partitions you
    > previously created on your external HDD. Understand that when you
    > originally
    > multi-partitioned that external HDD into two partitions the drive letters
    > assigned to each of those partitions is of no consequence in terms of our
    > present discussion except in "telling" Casper which partition should act
    > as
    > the destination drive for the purposes of receiving the cloned contents of
    > your HDD #1. Let's say, as an example, you will be cloning the contents of
    > that drive to the F: partition on the external HDD, the other partition
    > having been assigned the G: drive letter assignment.
    >
    > You will use the same basic process to clone the contents of your Win7 OS
    > contained on internal HDD #2, but this time using the "G:" partition as
    > the
    > recipient of those cloned contents.
    >
    > So now you have your external HDD containing the cloned contents of your
    > XP
    > & Win7 systems. The fact that the two partitions on the external HDD have
    > been designated F: & G: are really of no relevance here. Since your
    > external
    > HDD is a bootable device you will be able to boot to either of the OSs
    > contained on the external HDD. Let's say you desire to boot to the cloned
    > XP
    > OS contained on partition F:. (As I previously indicated you will have to
    > first ensure that the selected partition is marked "Active"; I previously
    > explained that simple process using Disk Management) . Then ensure that
    > the
    > BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
    > The system will then boot to the cloned XP OS on your external HDD and
    > receive a C: drive letter assignment. The partition containing the cloned
    > Win7 OS will receive a non-C: letter assignment, possibly retaining the G:
    > drive letter assignment. In any event the drive letter assigned to the
    > latter partition is of no relevance re our discussion.
    >
    > Once again, you would follow the same basic process should you desire to
    > boot to the cloned Win7 OS on the external HDD. Again ensuring that the
    > partition containing that OS is marked "Active" and the BIOS boot priority
    > order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
    >
    > Obviously there are different approaches one can take to meet your
    > objectives but as I stated I believe the approach I'm suggesting is a
    > sensible one under your circumstances.
    > Anna



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:ei4HZTupKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Anna,
    >
    > Thanks again for clarifying several things that were bothering me
    > regarding
    > the use of the external drive in a multi partition mode. Since I haven't
    > downloaded the Windows 7 OS yet, I don't know its footprint size. The XP
    > installation is about 40 gigs including all of my apps so I would guess
    > that
    > the W7 installation sans apps would be less than that. I would think that
    > 3
    > 80 gig partitions on the external drive would be about right. I will let
    > you know how it works out when I finally decide to tackle it.



    bobster:
    Well give the configuration I've suggested a try and see how it works out
    for you. If after working with it you're dissatisfied with that approach,
    then simply try another configuration possibly along the lines you
    previously contemplated. Nearly needless to say you will be sure of course
    to maintain comprehensive backups of your system(s) when making any
    significant changes.

    I'm not clear on why you would want to create *three* partitions on your
    external HDD rather than two. Certainly there would be no problem or harm in
    doing so since you've indicated you're working with total data roughly
    approximating 40 GB in each of the two OSs so since you'll be working with a
    320 GB HDD it would seem there's plenty of disk space to accommodate both of
    the OSs. I suppose you're contemplating using the third partition to contain
    other data of one sort or another.

    But whatever you decide it would be interesting to later hear from you as to
    how things worked out.
    Anna
     
  17. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Anna,

    I have been reading up on the possible pitfalls when downloading Windows 7
    to an operating XP computer. One quotation (see below) kinda scared me as
    I definitely do not want to affect in any way, or lose my XP capability.

    "When installing a computer operating system, you will need to reinstall all
    existing hardware (i.e. printers, network cards, etc.)."

    My question:

    If, when I get Win 7 installed and "all existing hardware (i.e. printers,
    network cards, etc.) have been reinstalled (changed to suit Win7, I assume),
    and I decide to boot up to one of my HDs that have the XP system on it, will
    I still have a completely unmodified operational XP system or will the
    hardware interface changes made to accommodate Win 7 screw up my XP
    operation?

    Sorry if I sound like an old worry wart (I'm 80) but I'm somewhat paranoid
    about screwing up or losing my superbly operating XP based system.

    TIA for you answer


    "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    news:ejwFma0pKHA.5840@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...

    >>>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    >>>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
    >>>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
    >>>>> with all updates. It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to
    >>>>> the
    >>>>> same
    >>>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory. The three HDs are located in the two
    >>>>> internal positions and one external enclosure. I have been given a
    >>>>> gift
    >>>>> of
    >>>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.
    >>>>> My
    >>>>> questions:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and
    >>>>> everything
    >>>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will
    >>>>> still
    >>>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
    >>>>> HDs.
    >>>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
    >>>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
    >>>>> will
    >>>>> prevent me from doing this. What I really want to accomplish is to
    >>>>> get
    >>>>> W7
    >>>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one
    >>>>> of
    >>>>> my
    >>>>> 2 remaining XP drives. In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system
    >>>>> and
    >>>>> two
    >>>>> XP systems.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Why would I want to do this? Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
    >>>>> don't
    >>>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch
    >>>>> to
    >>>>> W7
    >>>>> eventually. The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
    >>>>> capability
    >>>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
    >>>>> back
    >>>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable
    >>>>> with
    >>>>> W7.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any problem with doing this?



    >>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:-O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>> bobster:
    >>> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another
    >>> option
    >>> you might want to consider...
    >>>
    >>> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the
    >>> Casper
    >>> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
    >>> released
    >>> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
    >>> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
    >>> assuming,
    >>> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as
    >>> well.
    >>> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
    >>> capability.)
    >>>
    >>> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the
    >>> extent
    >>> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so
    >>> that
    >>> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7
    >>> systems?
    >>> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
    >>> contain the contents of both OSs.
    >>>
    >>> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
    >>> HDD
    >>> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot
    >>> priority
    >>> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
    >>> matter
    >>> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
    >>>
    >>> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
    >>> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
    >>> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
    >>> Anna



    >> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    >> news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>> Anna,
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the sage advice. Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but
    >>> since
    >>> my
    >>> external HD enclosure is connected via a SATA port, the new USB boot
    >>> capability didn't provide much usable new capability. Not a problem for
    >>> me
    >>> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable, and I have always been
    >>> able
    >>> to
    >>> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
    >>> port via an eSATA cable. And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
    >>> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive. I
    >>> also
    >>> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
    >>>
    >>> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
    >>> each
    >>> with a new drive letter. The procedure in the XP Help and Support
    >>> section
    >>> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks again for your help.



    >> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    >> news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> bobster:
    >> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
    >> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal
    >> situation.
    >> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port
    >> it
    >> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
    >> device.
    >> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
    >> the
    >> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
    >> external
    >> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
    >>
    >> In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device
    >> is
    >> certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
    >> outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
    >> dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).
    >>
    >> It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk
    >> Management
    >> snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no
    >> difficulty
    >> doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
    >> "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the
    >> current
    >> partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally
    >> clone
    >> the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.
    >>
    >> If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
    >> cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk
    >> Management
    >> to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already
    >> shown
    >> as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click
    >> on
    >> the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the
    >> sub-menu.
    >> And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
    >> that the system will boot to the external disk.
    >> Anna

    >
    >
    > "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    > news:u0uYf$rpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> Anna,
    >>
    >> Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
    >> bought the full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
    >> rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD. The other end
    >> connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board. I've never
    >> had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
    >> capable Vantec external enclosure.
    >>
    >> I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have
    >> been
    >> discussing. As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
    >> position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one. They each
    >> have
    >> been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have
    >> 3
    >> partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
    >> destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2
    >> or
    >> more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
    >> size of the drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper
    >> will
    >> probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either
    >> internal
    >> drive to a partition on the external drive. If that happens I would
    >> probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
    >> re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.
    >>
    >> I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive
    >> formatting,
    >> but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
    >> re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for
    >> XP
    >> and Windows 7. Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
    >> configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to
    >> the
    >> Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320
    >> g
    >> WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with
    >> XP/IE-8
    >> on it) to this HD. This sounds complicated but I can change a drive in
    >> the
    >> Vantec in about 5 minutes.
    >>
    >> I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as
    >> there
    >> is no hurry to do anything.
    >>
    >> Any additional comments will be appreciated.



    > "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    > news:-OYKd2EupKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > bobster:
    > It seems to me that the most straightforward & efficient configuration in
    > your situation based upon your objective of working with two different
    > operating systems and having at your disposal two internal HDDs plus an
    > external HDD is to...
    > 1. Install the XP system on one internal HDD.
    > 2. Install the Win7 system on the other internal HDD.
    > 3. Utilize your external HDD as the "destination" HDD, and use your Casper
    > disk-cloning program as the vehicle to contain the cloned contents of each
    > of the two internal HDDs. As I previously indicated you would
    > multi-partition the external HDD into two partitions to accommodate the
    > cloned contents of each OS.
    >
    > Naturally this assumes that the 320 GB external HDD you're working with
    > contains sufficient disk space to contain those cloned contents. You
    > haven't
    > indicated the total amount of data you're working with in each of those
    > two
    > systems but I'm assuming each of the external drive's partitions you
    > create
    > would be sufficient in size to accommodate the cloned contents of that
    > particular OS. Is that a reasonable assumption?
    >
    > I'm also assuming each of your two internal HDDs will be
    > single-partitioned.
    > Given the configuration I'm suggesting I see no reason to multi-partition
    > these drives.
    >
    > Forget about drive letter assignments re the external HDD. They are of
    > *no*
    > relevance in this situation. The same is true of your internal HDDs. As an
    > example...
    >
    > Let's say your XP OS is installed on internal HDD #1 and your Win7 OS is
    > installed on internal HDD #2. Now you decide to boot to your XP OS.
    > Assuming
    > the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to HDD #1 the
    > system
    > will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive letter
    > assignment.
    >
    > Since your second internal HDD containing the Win7 is also connected as a
    > secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: drive letter
    > assignment. Again the drive letter assigned to that drive during this
    > operation is of no consequence based upon what we are discussing.
    >
    > Let's say at another time you now desire to boot to your Win7 OS. Assuming
    > the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your HDD #2,
    > the
    > system will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive
    > letter assignment. Since your first internal HDD containing the XP OS is
    > also connected as a secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C:
    > drive letter assignment. Again, the drive letter assigned to that drive,
    > i.e., "HDD #1" during this operation is of no consequence based upon what
    > we
    > are discussing.
    >
    > And so on & so on...
    >
    > Now let's say that while you've booted to your XP OS ("HDD #1"), you
    > decide
    > to clone the contents of that drive to one of the two partitions you
    > previously created on your external HDD. Understand that when you
    > originally
    > multi-partitioned that external HDD into two partitions the drive letters
    > assigned to each of those partitions is of no consequence in terms of our
    > present discussion except in "telling" Casper which partition should act
    > as
    > the destination drive for the purposes of receiving the cloned contents of
    > your HDD #1. Let's say, as an example, you will be cloning the contents of
    > that drive to the F: partition on the external HDD, the other partition
    > having been assigned the G: drive letter assignment.
    >
    > You will use the same basic process to clone the contents of your Win7 OS
    > contained on internal HDD #2, but this time using the "G:" partition as
    > the
    > recipient of those cloned contents.
    >
    > So now you have your external HDD containing the cloned contents of your
    > XP
    > & Win7 systems. The fact that the two partitions on the external HDD have
    > been designated F: & G: are really of no relevance here. Since your
    > external
    > HDD is a bootable device you will be able to boot to either of the OSs
    > contained on the external HDD. Let's say you desire to boot to the cloned
    > XP
    > OS contained on partition F:. (As I previously indicated you will have to
    > first ensure that the selected partition is marked "Active"; I previously
    > explained that simple process using Disk Management) . Then ensure that
    > the
    > BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
    > The system will then boot to the cloned XP OS on your external HDD and
    > receive a C: drive letter assignment. The partition containing the cloned
    > Win7 OS will receive a non-C: letter assignment, possibly retaining the G:
    > drive letter assignment. In any event the drive letter assigned to the
    > latter partition is of no relevance re our discussion.
    >
    > Once again, you would follow the same basic process should you desire to
    > boot to the cloned Win7 OS on the external HDD. Again ensuring that the
    > partition containing that OS is marked "Active" and the BIOS boot priority
    > order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
    >
    > Obviously there are different approaches one can take to meet your
    > objectives but as I stated I believe the approach I'm suggesting is a
    > sensible one under your circumstances.
    > Anna



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:ei4HZTupKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Anna,
    >
    > Thanks again for clarifying several things that were bothering me
    > regarding
    > the use of the external drive in a multi partition mode. Since I haven't
    > downloaded the Windows 7 OS yet, I don't know its footprint size. The XP
    > installation is about 40 gigs including all of my apps so I would guess
    > that
    > the W7 installation sans apps would be less than that. I would think that
    > 3
    > 80 gig partitions on the external drive would be about right. I will let
    > you know how it works out when I finally decide to tackle it.



    bobster:
    Well give the configuration I've suggested a try and see how it works out
    for you. If after working with it you're dissatisfied with that approach,
    then simply try another configuration possibly along the lines you
    previously contemplated. Nearly needless to say you will be sure of course
    to maintain comprehensive backups of your system(s) when making any
    significant changes.

    I'm not clear on why you would want to create *three* partitions on your
    external HDD rather than two. Certainly there would be no problem or harm in
    doing so since you've indicated you're working with total data roughly
    approximating 40 GB in each of the two OSs so since you'll be working with a
    320 GB HDD it would seem there's plenty of disk space to accommodate both of
    the OSs. I suppose you're contemplating using the third partition to contain
    other data of one sort or another.

    But whatever you decide it would be interesting to later hear from you as to
    how things worked out.
    Anna
     
  18. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    > "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
    > news:ejwFma0pKHA.5840@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > bobster:
    > Well give the configuration I've suggested a try and see how it works out
    > for you. If after working with it you're dissatisfied with that approach,
    > then simply try another configuration possibly along the lines you
    > previously contemplated. Nearly needless to say you will be sure of course
    > to maintain comprehensive backups of your system(s) when making any
    > significant changes.
    >
    > I'm not clear on why you would want to create *three* partitions on your
    > external HDD rather than two. Certainly there would be no problem or harm
    > in
    > doing so since you've indicated you're working with total data roughly
    > approximating 40 GB in each of the two OSs so since you'll be working with
    > a
    > 320 GB HDD it would seem there's plenty of disk space to accommodate both
    > of
    > the OSs. I suppose you're contemplating using the third partition to
    > contain
    > other data of one sort or another.
    >
    > But whatever you decide it would be interesting to later hear from you as
    > to
    > how things worked out.
    > Anna



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:uF2c$V1pKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Anna,
    >
    > Last night I was able to successfully partition my Vantec mounted HD into
    > 3
    > volumes of approximately 80g each with the remaining space left un-
    > partitioned. These 3 new partitions each have a new drive letter
    > assigned.
    > I used Casper to clone the "C" drive volume of my active drive to one of
    > the
    > "new" partitions on the external Vantec mounted drive. I then was able to
    > successfully boot my XP system from that drive. As you guessed, It is my
    > intent to use the three partitions as XP and Win7 backups and the third
    > partition for general storage such as pictures, etc.
    >
    >
    > BTW, I used a free partitioning utility, EASUS Partition Master 5.0.1, to
    > partition the external drive. It was easy to use and did the job with a
    > minimum of fuss.
    >
    > My next task will be to install Win 7 on my second internal HD. I'll
    > probably tackle that in the next few days. I'll let you know the result.
    > I
    > have run the Windows 7 upgrade advisor from MS and with a few minor
    > exceptions, it looks like I am good to go.



    bobster:
    As previously discussed there's certainly no harm in creating three
    partitions on your external HDD and since you plan to use that third
    partition for specialized data backup it makes sense to have
    multi-partitioned the drive in the way you did.

    But why did you leave "unallocated" disk space on the disk? Are you planning
    to utilize that disk space sometime in the future for add'l data storage?
    Just curious.

    While there's no harm in using the EASEUS Partition Master program to
    undertake the disk partitioning scheme - it's a fine program based on the
    limited experience I've had with it - there really was no reason why you
    couldn't have used Disk Management to carry out the multi-partitioning of
    your external HDD.

    Are you aware that you could have also used your Casper disk-cloning program
    to multi-partition your external HDD as well? It's one of the nice features
    of the program. Ordinarily you would do this when you initially clone the
    contents of your "source" drive to the external HDD. For example, let's say
    you intended to clone the contents of your XP OS on your internal HDD #1 to
    the external drive. You could use Casper to create the partition on the
    external HDD of whatever size you desired (as long, of course, that it was
    sufficient in size to hold the cloned contents). Then undertake the same
    process when you cloned the contents of your Win7 OS on your internal HDD #2
    to the external HDD. And finally create one or more partitions on the
    unallocated disk space of the external HDD should there be any unallocated
    disk space remaining.
    Anna
     
  19. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird

    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:%23cmOuV2pKHA.1544@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > Anna,
    >
    > I have been reading up on the possible pitfalls when downloading Windows 7
    > to an operating XP computer. One quotation (see below) kinda scared me
    > as
    > I definitely do not want to affect in any way, or lose my XP capability.
    >
    > "When installing a computer operating system, you will need to reinstall
    > all
    > existing hardware (i.e. printers, network cards, etc.)."
    >
    > My question:
    >
    > If, when I get Win 7 installed and "all existing hardware (i.e. printers,
    > network cards, etc.) have been reinstalled (changed to suit Win7, I
    > assume),
    > and I decide to boot up to one of my HDs that have the XP system on it,
    > will
    > I still have a completely unmodified operational XP system or will the
    > hardware interface changes made to accommodate Win 7 screw up my XP
    > operation?
    >
    > Sorry if I sound like an old worry wart (I'm 80) but I'm somewhat paranoid
    > about screwing up or losing my superbly operating XP based system.
    >
    > TIA for you answer



    bobster:
    No, there's no problem here that will affect your XP system since your XP OS
    will be installed on one HDD and the Win7 OS on another HDD. So when you
    boot to your XP OS (as previously discussed) the system will detect only
    those drivers, configurations, etc. that have been installed in connection
    with your XP OS. And when you boot to your Win7 OS (with the HDD containing
    the XP OS now a secondary HDD in the system) there will similarly be no
    adverse impact on your XP OS re Win7 drivers, configurations, etc. under
    those circumstances.
    Anna
     
  20. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Anna,

    I've hit a snag. When I partition my external HD into 3 partitions, only
    one (always the first) partition can contain a bootable volume. The second
    and third partitions have unique drive letters assigned but my BIOS
    recognizes only the first volume drive letter in its lists of bootable
    drives. I have found no way of changing the BIOS to overcome this
    limitation.

    When I go to XP disk management, the first volume shows up as the "primary
    partition" while the second and third volumes show up as "extended partition
    logical drives". When I right click on either of these two partitions,
    there is no "mark partition as active" option as there is when right
    clicking the first partition. I have tried using XP, EASEUS and Casper to
    partition the external HD into 3 partitions and all resulted in three
    partitions in which only partition one could be used to boot. The
    limitation may possibly be in the Casper cloning concept but I have read
    their use notes and can't find an answer to the problem.

    At this point it appears to me that I cannot have two bootable partitions on
    a single hard drive unless I go to a true dual boot configuration for W7 and
    XP. At this point I am considering reverting to my "plan" B approach, i.e.
    using two separate external HDs in the Vantec enclosure. I have an extra HD
    and changing them in the enclosure is a five minute task.

    If you have any other thoughts let me know.

    TIA
    "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message news:uSSphL3pKHA
    HDs.3980@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...

    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:%23cmOuV2pKHA.1544@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > Anna,
    >
    > I have been reading up on the possible pitfalls when downloading Windows 7
    > to an operating XP computer. One quotation (see below) kinda scared me
    > as
    > I definitely do not want to affect in any way, or lose my XP capability.
    >
    > "When installing a computer operating system, you will need to reinstall
    > all
    > existing hardware (i.e. printers, network cards, etc.)."
    >
    > My question:
    >
    > If, when I get Win 7 installed and "all existing hardware (i.e. printers,
    > network cards, etc.) have been reinstalled (changed to suit Win7, I
    > assume),
    > and I decide to boot up to one of my HDs that have the XP system on it,
    > will
    > I still have a completely unmodified operational XP system or will the
    > hardware interface changes made to accommodate Win 7 screw up my XP
    > operation?
    >
    > Sorry if I sound like an old worry wart (I'm 80) but I'm somewhat paranoid
    > about screwing up or losing my superbly operating XP based system.
    >
    > TIA for you answer



    bobster:
    No, there's no problem here that will affect your XP system since your XP OS
    will be installed on one HDD and the Win7 OS on another HDD. So when you
    boot to your XP OS (as previously discussed) the system will detect only
    those drivers, configurations, etc. that have been installed in connection
    with your XP OS. And when you boot to your Win7 OS (with the HDD containing
    the XP OS now a secondary HDD in the system) there will similarly be no
    adverse impact on your XP OS re Win7 drivers, configurations, etc. under
    those circumstances.
    Anna
     

Share This Page