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Windows7 64 bit Partitions

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by azTom, May 16, 2010.

  1. azTom

    azTom Flightless Bird

    What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.
     
  2. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    azTom wrote:
    > What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    > drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    > create another partition with the built-in disk management program
    > and it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.


    Used to be you were limited to four primary partitions, but you could
    make more drives by making one an extended partition with logical
    drives. I don't know if there is a limit to how many logical drives can
    be hosted, possibly however many drive letters are not assigned.

    But if you have five primary partitions, all bets are off. I don't know
    how you got five partitions.

    --
    Crash

    "The real question is not whether machines think but whether men do."
    ~ B. F. Skinner ~
     
  3. SC Tom

    SC Tom Flightless Bird

    "azTom" <tomaz@cox.net> wrote in message
    news:v__Hn.7125$V%2.1853@newsfe08.iad...
    > What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    > drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    > create another partition with the built-in disk management program and it
    > said I already had the maximum number of partitions.


    Extend one of the partitions to include the free space, then create logical
    partitions within it. IIRC, you can create logical partitions as long as you
    have a letter free to assign to it.
    --
    SC Tom
     
  4. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    SC Tom wrote:
    >
    > "azTom" <tomaz@cox.net> wrote in message
    > news:v__Hn.7125$V%2.1853@newsfe08.iad...
    >> What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a
    >> hard drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I
    >> tried to create another partition with the built-in disk management
    >> program and it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.
    >>

    >
    > Extend one of the partitions to include the free space, then create
    > logical partitions within it. IIRC, you can create logical partitions
    > as long as you have a letter free to assign to it.


    I did some fiddling around with Disk Manager and a bare external drive.
    If you start creating partitions, when you get to the fourth one an
    extended partition with a logical drive is created is created
    automatically. Any more volumes are created as logical drives.

    --
    Crash

    Life is short. Eat dessert first.
     
  5. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 16 May 2010 16:13:56 -0700, azTom <tomaz@cox.net> wrote:

    > What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    > drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    > create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    > it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.




    The maximum number of partitions is four, regardless of the version of
    Windows. You don't have five partitions, you have somewhere between
    two and four.

    One or more of your partitions is what's called an "extended"
    partition and it's divided into logical drives.

    Although they are technically *not* partitions, logical drives are
    used just like partitions, and most of us informally call them
    "partitions" most of the time.

    By the way, five "partitions" is a very large number for the great
    majority of people. Why do you have so many, and why do you want a
    sixth? Except for those people with multiple operating systems
    installed and dual booting, either one or two partitions is the best
    number for almost everyone.

    You might want to read this article on partitions I've written:
    "Understanding Disk Partitioning" at
    http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=326


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     
  6. azTom

    azTom Flightless Bird

    On 5/16/2010 6:13 PM, Ken Blake wrote:
    > On Sun, 16 May 2010 16:13:56 -0700, azTom<tomaz@cox.net> wrote:
    >
    >> What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    >> drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    >> create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    >> it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.

    >
    >
    >
    > The maximum number of partitions is four, regardless of the version of
    > Windows. You don't have five partitions, you have somewhere between
    > two and four.
    >
    > One or more of your partitions is what's called an "extended"
    > partition and it's divided into logical drives.
    >
    > Although they are technically *not* partitions, logical drives are
    > used just like partitions, and most of us informally call them
    > "partitions" most of the time.
    >
    > By the way, five "partitions" is a very large number for the great
    > majority of people. Why do you have so many, and why do you want a
    > sixth? Except for those people with multiple operating systems
    > installed and dual booting, either one or two partitions is the best
    > number for almost everyone.
    >
    > You might want to read this article on partitions I've written:
    > "Understanding Disk Partitioning" at
    > http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=326
    >
    >
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003

    1- Operating System
    2-Data
    3-Down Loads
    4-Pictures
    5-Important Stuff
    6-? Programs I do not have to reinstall when reinstalling the operating
    system
     
  7. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 17 May 2010 12:24:27 -0700, azTom <tomaz@cox.net> wrote:

    > On 5/16/2010 6:13 PM, Ken Blake wrote:
    > > On Sun, 16 May 2010 16:13:56 -0700, azTom<tomaz@cox.net> wrote:
    > >
    > >> What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    > >> drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    > >> create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    > >> it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > The maximum number of partitions is four, regardless of the version of
    > > Windows. You don't have five partitions, you have somewhere between
    > > two and four.
    > >
    > > One or more of your partitions is what's called an "extended"
    > > partition and it's divided into logical drives.
    > >
    > > Although they are technically *not* partitions, logical drives are
    > > used just like partitions, and most of us informally call them
    > > "partitions" most of the time.
    > >
    > > By the way, five "partitions" is a very large number for the great
    > > majority of people. Why do you have so many, and why do you want a
    > > sixth? Except for those people with multiple operating systems
    > > installed and dual booting, either one or two partitions is the best
    > > number for almost everyone.
    > >
    > > You might want to read this article on partitions I've written:
    > > "Understanding Disk Partitioning" at
    > > http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=326
    > >
    > >
    > > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003



    > 1- Operating System
    > 2-Data
    > 3-Down Loads
    > 4-Pictures
    > 5-Important Stuff
    > 6-? Programs I do not have to reinstall when reinstalling the operating
    > system




    Your choice of course, but just about everything other than category 1
    is essentially the same. As a single example, pictures is just one
    particular kind of data. In my view, there's little or no reason to
    separate these things. And there are disadvantages to having so many
    partitions. I recommend that you read my article that I mentioned
    above.


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     
  8. SC Tom

    SC Tom Flightless Bird

    "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote in message
    news:n651v59u1s9u3br47amu6lrmmph7uf9kr4@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 16 May 2010 16:13:56 -0700, azTom <tomaz@cox.net> wrote:
    >
    >> What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    >> drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    >> create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    >> it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.

    >
    >
    >
    > The maximum number of partitions is four, regardless of the version of
    > Windows. You don't have five partitions, you have somewhere between
    > two and four.
    >
    > One or more of your partitions is what's called an "extended"
    > partition and it's divided into logical drives.
    >
    > Although they are technically *not* partitions, logical drives are
    > used just like partitions, and most of us informally call them
    > "partitions" most of the time.
    >
    > By the way, five "partitions" is a very large number for the great
    > majority of people. Why do you have so many, and why do you want a
    > sixth? Except for those people with multiple operating systems
    > installed and dual booting, either one or two partitions is the best
    > number for almost everyone.
    >
    > You might want to read this article on partitions I've written:
    > "Understanding Disk Partitioning" at
    > http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=326
    >
    >
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003


    Good article, Ken!
    Reason One brought back some not-so-good memories. We had two new servers
    that were to have NT4.0 Server installed on the primary partition, then
    other partitions were going to be mapped network drives (this was all
    company policy from our HQ in Ohio, not the local IT department's (me :))
    idea). Since we are in the South, and Northerners at the main office know
    everything (their attitude, not mine), I had no choice but to set them up
    the way they wanted it. Wouldn't you know, about a year into owning them,
    the C: partition (Windows) was running low on space and setting errors
    almost constantly. Luckily there was enough space on an adjoining partition
    that by purchasing Partition Magic (IIRC) I was able to expand it out enough
    to last us quite a while longer.
    Those days are gone now, thank goodness. When I retired, we were running
    2003 Server, and things were much better. I don't miss any of that.
    --
    SC Tom
     
  9. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 17 May 2010 16:42:55 -0400, "SC Tom" <sc@tom.net> wrote:

    >
    > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote in message
    > news:n651v59u1s9u3br47amu6lrmmph7uf9kr4@4ax.com...
    > > On Sun, 16 May 2010 16:13:56 -0700, azTom <tomaz@cox.net> wrote:
    > >
    > >> What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    > >> drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    > >> create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    > >> it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > The maximum number of partitions is four, regardless of the version of
    > > Windows. You don't have five partitions, you have somewhere between
    > > two and four.
    > >
    > > One or more of your partitions is what's called an "extended"
    > > partition and it's divided into logical drives.
    > >
    > > Although they are technically *not* partitions, logical drives are
    > > used just like partitions, and most of us informally call them
    > > "partitions" most of the time.
    > >
    > > By the way, five "partitions" is a very large number for the great
    > > majority of people. Why do you have so many, and why do you want a
    > > sixth? Except for those people with multiple operating systems
    > > installed and dual booting, either one or two partitions is the best
    > > number for almost everyone.
    > >
    > > You might want to read this article on partitions I've written:
    > > "Understanding Disk Partitioning" at
    > > http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=326
    > >
    > >
    > > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003

    >
    > Good article, Ken!




    Thanks very much, Tom.



    > Reason One brought back some not-so-good memories. We had two new servers
    > that were to have NT4.0 Server installed on the primary partition, then
    > other partitions were going to be mapped network drives (this was all
    > company policy from our HQ in Ohio, not the local IT department's (me :))
    > idea). Since we are in the South, and Northerners at the main office know
    > everything (their attitude, not mine), I had no choice but to set them up
    > the way they wanted it. Wouldn't you know, about a year into owning them,
    > the C: partition (Windows) was running low on space and setting errors
    > almost constantly. Luckily there was enough space on an adjoining partition
    > that by purchasing Partition Magic (IIRC) I was able to expand it out enough
    > to last us quite a while longer.
    > Those days are gone now, thank goodness. When I retired, we were running
    > 2003 Server, and things were much better. I don't miss any of that.
    > --
    > SC Tom

    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     
  10. Gene E. Bloch

    Gene E. Bloch Flightless Bird

    On 5/17/10, azTom posted:
    > 6-? Programs I do not have to reinstall when reinstalling the operating
    > system


    That will work only if you install "portable" versions of those
    programs.

    That means versions that don't use the registry or AppData. Not all
    programs have portable versions. Those that do can be run from memory
    sticks, thus the name portable.

    Any other programs will have to be reinstalled to set up the registry
    and other files properly.

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)
     
  11. Mad Ad

    Mad Ad Flightless Bird

    "SC Tom" <sc@tom.net> wrote in message
    news:fThIn.12053$Gx2.11288@newsfe20.iad...
    >
    > Good article, Ken!



    Its a terrible article, full of opinion and personal judgements leaving
    little or no room for people to use something as it fits them within the
    limitations of the hardware. This is a technical subject, if there is truth
    to be said, say it without the opinion. Keep that for the conclusions, or a
    seperate section of 'advice' (if thats what he thinks it is).

    Im mildly miffed that im being told that having a seperate drive for music
    has no advantage and i should be treating it like any other type of data,
    seems Ken wants us all to have a single 2 terrabyte partition (or however
    big your drive is) and call it good. There IS advantages to having things
    in different holes but rather than debate opinions I think we will have to
    agree to differ.

    Not one of your best Ken, sorry.
     
  12. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    Mad Ad wrote:
    > "SC Tom" <sc@tom.net> wrote in message
    > news:fThIn.12053$Gx2.11288@newsfe20.iad...
    >> Good article, Ken!

    >
    >
    > Its a terrible article, full of opinion and personal judgements leaving
    > little or no room for people to use something as it fits them within the
    > limitations of the hardware. This is a technical subject, if there is truth
    > to be said, say it without the opinion. Keep that for the conclusions, or a
    > seperate section of 'advice' (if thats what he thinks it is).
    >
    > Im mildly miffed that im being told that having a seperate drive for music
    > has no advantage and i should be treating it like any other type of data,
    > seems Ken wants us all to have a single 2 terrabyte partition (or however
    > big your drive is) and call it good. There IS advantages to having things
    > in different holes but rather than debate opinions I think we will have to
    > agree to differ.
    >
    > Not one of your best Ken, sorry.


    Didn't read the article. I personally prefer divvying things up into
    smaller pieces, putting the system, apps, various forms of data, and
    archives each in their own little cubbyhole, especially with the
    humongous hard drives available now. It makes keeping track of things
    and housekeeping much easier for me.

    Naturally, anybody who does it differently is an idiot. :)
    --
    Crash

    "It is not necessary to change. Survival is not mandatory."
    ~ W. Edwards Deming ~
     
  13. John Morrison

    John Morrison Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 16 May 2010 18:13:13 -0700, Ken Blake
    <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote:

    >On Sun, 16 May 2010 16:13:56 -0700, azTom <tomaz@cox.net> wrote:
    >
    >> What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    >> drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    >> create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    >> it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.

    >
    >The maximum number of partitions is four, regardless of the version of
    >Windows. You don't have five partitions, you have somewhere between
    >two and four.
    >
    >By the way, five "partitions" is a very large number for the great
    >majority of people. Why do you have so many, and why do you want a
    >sixth? Except for those people with multiple operating systems
    >installed and dual booting, either one or two partitions is the best
    >number for almost everyone.


    I've always used "three" partitions, going back as far as Windows 3.1.
    But I've had no reason so far to use more than "three partitions".

    Currently I install only Windows 7 to C: drive.
    On D: drive I have a folder "Archives" where I keep "My Documents"
    Also on D: I have a folder "Attic" where I store installation files for
    the many programs that I use. "My Music" is stored on E: drive.

    My backup policy is that C: drive is never backed up. Whereas D: & E
    drives are backed up to external hard drives frequently.
    So after Windows 7 is installed I'm aware that any data from programs
    subsequently installed on C: drive will be eventually lost.

    When I re-install Windows 7 and start installing my favourite programs,
    I'm aware that programs that were previously installed on C: drive will
    have to be reinstalled and my previous settings have been lost.

    Some programs on D: drive will need to be re-installed but they will
    have retained their settings. Some others such as "Eudora 7.1.0.9",
    "Forté Agent " news reader, and the "Opera browser" won't need
    re-installing, all that is necessary is create shortcuts to open them.
    --

    John
     
  14. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 19 May 2010 15:57:09 +1000, John Morrison
    <the_morrisons@com.invalid> wrote:

    > On Sun, 16 May 2010 18:13:13 -0700, Ken Blake
    > <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote:
    >
    > >On Sun, 16 May 2010 16:13:56 -0700, azTom <tomaz@cox.net> wrote:
    > >
    > >> What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    > >> drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    > >> create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    > >> it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.

    > >
    > >The maximum number of partitions is four, regardless of the version of
    > >Windows. You don't have five partitions, you have somewhere between
    > >two and four.
    > >
    > >By the way, five "partitions" is a very large number for the great
    > >majority of people. Why do you have so many, and why do you want a
    > >sixth? Except for those people with multiple operating systems
    > >installed and dual booting, either one or two partitions is the best
    > >number for almost everyone.

    >
    > I've always used "three" partitions, going back as far as Windows 3.1.
    > But I've had no reason so far to use more than "three partitions".
    >
    > Currently I install only Windows 7 to C: drive.
    > On D: drive I have a folder "Archives" where I keep "My Documents"
    > Also on D: I have a folder "Attic" where I store installation files for
    > the many programs that I use. "My Music" is stored on E: drive.
    >
    > My backup policy is that C: drive is never backed up. Whereas D: & E
    > drives are backed up to external hard drives frequently.



    Your choice of course, but personally I see no reason to separate what
    you put on D: and what you put on E:. If I were in your shoes, I would
    only have a single partition for the two of them.

    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     
  15. John Morrison

    John Morrison Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 19 May 2010 11:10:16 -0700, Ken Blake
    <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote:

    >On Wed, 19 May 2010 15:57:09 +1000, John Morrison
    ><the_morrisons@com.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 16 May 2010 18:13:13 -0700, Ken Blake
    >> <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >On Sun, 16 May 2010 16:13:56 -0700, azTom <tomaz@cox.net> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    >> >> drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    >> >> create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    >> >> it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.
    >> >
    >> >The maximum number of partitions is four, regardless of the version of
    >> >Windows. You don't have five partitions, you have somewhere between
    >> >two and four.
    >> >
    >> >By the way, five "partitions" is a very large number for the great
    >> >majority of people. Why do you have so many, and why do you want a
    >> >sixth? Except for those people with multiple operating systems
    >> >installed and dual booting, either one or two partitions is the best
    >> >number for almost everyone.

    >>
    >> I've always used "three" partitions, going back as far as Windows 3.1.
    >> But I've had no reason so far to use more than "three partitions".
    >>
    >> Currently I install only Windows 7 to C: drive.
    >> On D: drive I have a folder "Archives" where I keep "My Documents"
    >> Also on D: I have a folder "Attic" where I store installation files for
    >> the many programs that I use. "My Music" is stored on E: drive.
    >>
    >> My backup policy is that C: drive is never backed up. Whereas D: & E
    >> drives are backed up to external hard drives frequently.

    >
    >Your choice of course, but personally I see no reason to separate what
    >you put on D: and what you put on E:. If I were in your shoes, I would
    >only have a single partition for the two of them.


    Thanks for that Ken, I'll be keeping that very much in mind.
    The next time I format C: would be a good time to create just a single
    D: partition instead of having both D: & E:
    --

    John
     
  16. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Thu, 20 May 2010 12:52:37 +1000, John Morrison
    <the_morrisons@com.invalid> wrote:

    > On Wed, 19 May 2010 11:10:16 -0700, Ken Blake
    > <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote:
    >


    > >Your choice of course, but personally I see no reason to separate what
    > >you put on D: and what you put on E:. If I were in your shoes, I would
    > >only have a single partition for the two of them.

    >
    > Thanks for that Ken, I'll be keeping that very much in mind.
    > The next time I format C: would be a good time to create just a single
    > D: partition instead of having both D: & E:



    You're welcome. Glad to help.
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     
  17. azTom

    azTom Flightless Bird

    Re: Windows7 64 bit Partitions Problem Solved

    On 5/16/2010 4:13 PM, azTom wrote:
    > What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    > drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    > create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    > it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.

    Installed FREE Partition Wizard Home Edition 5.0 now I can make as many
    partition/volumes as needed, each with a designated letter.
     
  18. Prescott

    Prescott Flightless Bird

    azTom wrote:
    > On 5/16/2010 6:13 PM, Ken Blake wrote:
    >> On Sun, 16 May 2010 16:13:56 -0700, azTom<tomaz@cox.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    >>> drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    >>> create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    >>> it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> The maximum number of partitions is four, regardless of the version of
    >> Windows. You don't have five partitions, you have somewhere between
    >> two and four.
    >>
    >> One or more of your partitions is what's called an "extended"
    >> partition and it's divided into logical drives.
    >>
    >> Although they are technically *not* partitions, logical drives are
    >> used just like partitions, and most of us informally call them
    >> "partitions" most of the time.
    >>
    >> By the way, five "partitions" is a very large number for the great
    >> majority of people. Why do you have so many, and why do you want a
    >> sixth? Except for those people with multiple operating systems
    >> installed and dual booting, either one or two partitions is the best
    >> number for almost everyone.
    >>
    >> You might want to read this article on partitions I've written:
    >> "Understanding Disk Partitioning" at
    >> http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=326
    >>
    >>
    >> Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003

    > 1- Operating System
    > 2-Data
    > 3-Down Loads
    > 4-Pictures
    > 5-Important Stuff
    > 6-? Programs I do not have to reinstall when reinstalling the operating
    > system


    1 - Operating System
    2 - Downloads
    3 - Backups
    4 - Virtual Machines
     
  19. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Thu, 20 May 2010 17:02:06 -0400, Prescott <Prescott@bogus.com>
    wrote:

    > azTom wrote:
    > > On 5/16/2010 6:13 PM, Ken Blake wrote:
    > >> On Sun, 16 May 2010 16:13:56 -0700, azTom<tomaz@cox.net> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> What is or is there a maximum number of partitions allowed on a hard
    > >>> drive. I have a large HD with 5 partitions and 317GB free I tried to
    > >>> create another partition with the built-in disk management program and
    > >>> it said I already had the maximum number of partitions.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> The maximum number of partitions is four, regardless of the version of
    > >> Windows. You don't have five partitions, you have somewhere between
    > >> two and four.
    > >>
    > >> One or more of your partitions is what's called an "extended"
    > >> partition and it's divided into logical drives.
    > >>
    > >> Although they are technically *not* partitions, logical drives are
    > >> used just like partitions, and most of us informally call them
    > >> "partitions" most of the time.
    > >>
    > >> By the way, five "partitions" is a very large number for the great
    > >> majority of people. Why do you have so many, and why do you want a
    > >> sixth? Except for those people with multiple operating systems
    > >> installed and dual booting, either one or two partitions is the best
    > >> number for almost everyone.
    > >>
    > >> You might want to read this article on partitions I've written:
    > >> "Understanding Disk Partitioning" at
    > >> http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=326
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003

    > > 1- Operating System
    > > 2-Data
    > > 3-Down Loads
    > > 4-Pictures
    > > 5-Important Stuff
    > > 6-? Programs I do not have to reinstall when reinstalling the operating
    > > system

    >
    > 1 - Operating System
    > 2 - Downloads
    > 3 - Backups
    > 4 - Virtual Machines




    Where do you keep your data?

    I'll comment on numbers 2 and 3. A separate partition for downloads is
    way overkill, as far as I'm concerned. I don't see any good reason for
    separating that in a partition of its own.

    But the giant problem is having a partition for backups. Keeping your
    backups on a partition on your only hard drive is just kidding
    yourself. That's far and away the weakest form of backup there is, and
    is almost equivalent to having no backup at all. It leaves you
    susceptible to simultaneous loss of the original and backup to many of
    the most common dangers: head crashes, user errors, severe power
    glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus attacks, even theft of the
    computer.

    In my view, secure backup needs to be on removable media, and not kept
    in the computer. For really secure backup (needed, for example, if the
    life of your business depends on your data) you should have multiple
    generations of backup, and at least one of those generations should be
    stored off-site.



    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     

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