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What good are libraries?

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by Stan Brown, Aug 29, 2010.

  1. Stan Brown

    Stan Brown Flightless Bird

    Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    Windows 7?

    Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    search terms.


    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com
    Shikata ga nai...
     
  2. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    Stan Brown wrote:
    > Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them
    > I never > used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my
    > own hierarchy of folders on drives E and F. Am I missing
    > anything by not using libraries in Windows 7?
    >
    > Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    > the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    > search terms.


    I never liked My Documents, and now those other library folders, but that
    is because I am the only user of my computer. I suspect the "Libraries"
    are to accommodate multiple users, with the contents of the library folders
    depending on who is logged on.
    --
    Crash

    "When you want to fool the world, tell the truth."
    ~ Otto von Bismarck ~
     
  3. Zombie Elvis

    Zombie Elvis Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 29 Aug 2010 21:38:04 -0400, Stan Brown
    <the_stan_brown@fastmail.fm> wrote:

    >Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    >used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    >on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    >Windows 7?
    >
    >Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    >the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    >search terms.


    It's just a way to put all of your files in one place. Or rather it's
    a way to leave them right where they are but to create pointers to
    them so you can for example have separate heirarchies on separate
    drives but still have one place where you can access all of them. This
    is especially useful if you have a file server at home or a big
    external hard drive with a lot of different files.
    --
    Obama: Hey Ballmer, you mind if we borrow 90% of the world's computers for a quick cyber war?

    Ballmer: Finally, the moment I've been waiting for! *Throws ceremonial war chair at wall*

    - Seen on Slashdot

    Roberto Castillo
    robertocastillo@ameritech.net
    http://mind-grapes.blogspot.com/
    http://zombie-gulch.myminicity.com/
     
  4. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    Zombie Elvis wrote:

    > Stan Brown wrote:
    >
    >> Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    >> used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    >> on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    >> Windows 7?

    >
    > It's just a way to put all of your files in one place. Or rather it's
    > a way to leave them right where they are but to create pointers to
    > them so you can for example have separate heirarchies on separate
    > drives but still have one place where you can access all of them. This
    > is especially useful if you have a file server at home or a big
    > external hard drive with a lot of different files.


    Hmm, almost sounding like this might be Microsoft's dumbed down usage of
    junction points: the physical file is in one place but you can have
    *pointers* to them in multiple other places. Well, I can't remember the
    term right now, but junction points are pointers to folders. There was,
    I think, a different name for pointers to files. In *NIX, they're
    called soft/symbolic links (you can delete them but the physical file
    remains) or hard links (if you delete the link then the file also gets
    deleted).

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd861346.aspx

    Well, I suppose that tells you what are libraries - if you can
    understand it. Starting to wonder if WinFS is creeping into Windows 7
    with a databasing of files.
     
  5. Frank

    Frank Flightless Bird

    On 8/29/2010 6:38 PM, Stan Brown wrote:
    > Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    > used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    > on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    > Windows 7?
    >
    > Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    > the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    > search terms.
    >
    >

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/features/libraries
     
  6. Jeff Layman

    Jeff Layman Flightless Bird

    "Zombie Elvis" <DELETEMETOREPLYrobertocastillo@ameritech.net> wrote in
    message news:998m76lusij205fu0l9t7e0g1s8jmsfoac@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 29 Aug 2010 21:38:04 -0400, Stan Brown
    > <the_stan_brown@fastmail.fm> wrote:
    >
    >>Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    >>used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    >>on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    >>Windows 7?
    >>
    >>Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    >>the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    >>search terms.

    >
    > It's just a way to put all of your files in one place. Or rather it's
    > a way to leave them right where they are but to create pointers to
    > them so you can for example have separate heirarchies on separate
    > drives but still have one place where you can access all of them. This
    > is especially useful if you have a file server at home or a big
    > external hard drive with a lot of different files.


    I don't have any use for Libraries either.

    I thought they contained just harmless links to files - sort of like
    shortcuts, where you can delete a shortcut without deleting the original
    file. But those files in the Libraries folders are real - I just tried
    deleting a picture file and it got deleted from a "My Pictures" folder. Had
    to restore it from the recycle bin.

    So I've now removed all folders from the Libraries folder (pity I can't
    delete it, too).

    --

    Jeff
     
  7. Dave-UK

    Dave-UK Flightless Bird

    "Jeff Layman" <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote in message news:i5fs9v$8gn$1@news.albasani.net...
    > "Zombie Elvis" <DELETEMETOREPLYrobertocastillo@ameritech.net> wrote in
    > message news:998m76lusij205fu0l9t7e0g1s8jmsfoac@4ax.com...
    >> On Sun, 29 Aug 2010 21:38:04 -0400, Stan Brown
    >> <the_stan_brown@fastmail.fm> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    >>>used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    >>>on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    >>>Windows 7?
    >>>
    >>>Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    >>>the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    >>>search terms.

    >>
    >> It's just a way to put all of your files in one place. Or rather it's
    >> a way to leave them right where they are but to create pointers to
    >> them so you can for example have separate heirarchies on separate
    >> drives but still have one place where you can access all of them. This
    >> is especially useful if you have a file server at home or a big
    >> external hard drive with a lot of different files.

    >
    > I don't have any use for Libraries either.
    >
    > I thought they contained just harmless links to files - sort of like
    > shortcuts, where you can delete a shortcut without deleting the original
    > file. But those files in the Libraries folders are real - I just tried
    > deleting a picture file and it got deleted from a "My Pictures" folder. Had
    > to restore it from the recycle bin.
    >
    > So I've now removed all folders from the Libraries folder (pity I can't
    > delete it, too).
    >
    > --
    >
    > Jeff
    >


    You can remove the Libraries if you want to:
    http://www.askvg.com/how-to-disable-libraries-feature-in-windows-7/
     
  8. Gordon

    Gordon Flightless Bird

    On 30/08/2010 10:06, Jeff Layman wrote:
    > "Zombie Elvis" <DELETEMETOREPLYrobertocastillo@ameritech.net> wrote in
    > message news:998m76lusij205fu0l9t7e0g1s8jmsfoac@4ax.com...
    >> On Sun, 29 Aug 2010 21:38:04 -0400, Stan Brown
    >> <the_stan_brown@fastmail.fm> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    >>> used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    >>> on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    >>> Windows 7?
    >>>
    >>> Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    >>> the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    >>> search terms.

    >>
    >> It's just a way to put all of your files in one place. Or rather it's
    >> a way to leave them right where they are but to create pointers to
    >> them so you can for example have separate heirarchies on separate
    >> drives but still have one place where you can access all of them. This
    >> is especially useful if you have a file server at home or a big
    >> external hard drive with a lot of different files.

    >
    > I don't have any use for Libraries either.
    >
    > I thought they contained just harmless links to files - sort of like
    > shortcuts, where you can delete a shortcut without deleting the original
    > file. But those files in the Libraries folders are real - I just tried
    > deleting a picture file and it got deleted from a "My Pictures" folder.
    > Had to restore it from the recycle bin.
    >
    > So I've now removed all folders from the Libraries folder (pity I can't
    > delete it, too).
    >


    How To Disable and Remove Libraries from Windows 7

    Download and apply the following registry registration entries file to
    remove Libraries in Windows 7. See the code below to know which registry
    keys and values that is going to be removed, and if necessary, backup
    the affected registries.

    http://depositfiles.com/files/799mwaxwd


    Alternatively, copy and paste the following code into a text editor such
    as Notepad, and save as a file name with .reg extension, then double
    click to run the .reg file.

    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

    [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Desktop\NameSpace\{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}]
    [-HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}]
    [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\CLSID\{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}]
    [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{2112AB0A-C86A-4ffe-A368-0DE96E47012E}]
    [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{491E922F-5643-4af4-A7EB-4E7A138D8174}]
    [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{7b0db17d-9cd2-4a93-9733-46cc89022e7c}]
    [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{A302545D-DEFF-464b-ABE8-61C8648D939B}]
    [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{A990AE9F-A03B-4e80-94BC-9912D7504104}]
    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\HideDesktopIcons\NewStartPanel]
    “{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}”=-
     
  9. Jeff Layman

    Jeff Layman Flightless Bird

    "Dave-UK" <Here@Home.com> wrote in message
    news:vLednaKPxqAq5ObRnZ2dnUVZ8imdnZ2d@giganews.com...
    >
    > "Jeff Layman" <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:i5fs9v$8gn$1@news.albasani.net...
    >> "Zombie Elvis" <DELETEMETOREPLYrobertocastillo@ameritech.net> wrote in
    >> message news:998m76lusij205fu0l9t7e0g1s8jmsfoac@4ax.com...
    >>> On Sun, 29 Aug 2010 21:38:04 -0400, Stan Brown
    >>> <the_stan_brown@fastmail.fm> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    >>>>used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    >>>>on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    >>>>Windows 7?
    >>>>
    >>>>Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    >>>>the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    >>>>search terms.
    >>>
    >>> It's just a way to put all of your files in one place. Or rather it's
    >>> a way to leave them right where they are but to create pointers to
    >>> them so you can for example have separate heirarchies on separate
    >>> drives but still have one place where you can access all of them. This
    >>> is especially useful if you have a file server at home or a big
    >>> external hard drive with a lot of different files.

    >>
    >> I don't have any use for Libraries either.
    >>
    >> I thought they contained just harmless links to files - sort of like
    >> shortcuts, where you can delete a shortcut without deleting the original
    >> file. But those files in the Libraries folders are real - I just tried
    >> deleting a picture file and it got deleted from a "My Pictures" folder.
    >> Had to restore it from the recycle bin.
    >>
    >> So I've now removed all folders from the Libraries folder (pity I can't
    >> delete it, too).
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Jeff

    >
    > You can remove the Libraries if you want to:
    > http://www.askvg.com/how-to-disable-libraries-feature-in-windows-7/
    >


    Yes, I am aware of various reg editing methods to remove it, but it always
    seems a "sledgehammer to crack a nut" method to edit the registry for such
    things. Still, if MS didn't build things unnecessarily in reinforced
    concrete it would be necessary!

    Looks like an interesting site. I'll have a look through it to see if there
    is anything else I can make use of. Thanks for the link.

    --

    Jeff
     
  10. Jeff Layman

    Jeff Layman Flightless Bird

    "Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:i5ftk6$llo$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > On 30/08/2010 10:06, Jeff Layman wrote:
    >> "Zombie Elvis" <DELETEMETOREPLYrobertocastillo@ameritech.net> wrote in
    >> message news:998m76lusij205fu0l9t7e0g1s8jmsfoac@4ax.com...
    >>> On Sun, 29 Aug 2010 21:38:04 -0400, Stan Brown
    >>> <the_stan_brown@fastmail.fm> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    >>>> used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    >>>> on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    >>>> Windows 7?
    >>>>
    >>>> Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    >>>> the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    >>>> search terms.
    >>>
    >>> It's just a way to put all of your files in one place. Or rather it's
    >>> a way to leave them right where they are but to create pointers to
    >>> them so you can for example have separate heirarchies on separate
    >>> drives but still have one place where you can access all of them. This
    >>> is especially useful if you have a file server at home or a big
    >>> external hard drive with a lot of different files.

    >>
    >> I don't have any use for Libraries either.
    >>
    >> I thought they contained just harmless links to files - sort of like
    >> shortcuts, where you can delete a shortcut without deleting the original
    >> file. But those files in the Libraries folders are real - I just tried
    >> deleting a picture file and it got deleted from a "My Pictures" folder.
    >> Had to restore it from the recycle bin.
    >>
    >> So I've now removed all folders from the Libraries folder (pity I can't
    >> delete it, too).
    >>

    >
    > How To Disable and Remove Libraries from Windows 7
    >
    > Download and apply the following registry registration entries file to
    > remove Libraries in Windows 7. See the code below to know which registry
    > keys and values that is going to be removed, and if necessary, backup the
    > affected registries.
    >
    > http://depositfiles.com/files/799mwaxwd
    >
    >
    > Alternatively, copy and paste the following code into a text editor such
    > as Notepad, and save as a file name with .reg extension, then double click
    > to run the .reg file.
    >
    > Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
    >
    > [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Desktop\NameSpace\{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}]
    > [-HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}]
    > [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\CLSID\{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}]
    > [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{2112AB0A-C86A-4ffe-A368-0DE96E47012E}]
    > [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{491E922F-5643-4af4-A7EB-4E7A138D8174}]
    > [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{7b0db17d-9cd2-4a93-9733-46cc89022e7c}]
    > [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{A302545D-DEFF-464b-ABE8-61C8648D939B}]
    > [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{A990AE9F-A03B-4e80-94BC-9912D7504104}]
    > [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\HideDesktopIcons\NewStartPanel]
    > “{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}”=-


    A bit of an OT reply. As I pointed out to Dave-UK, I am aware of various
    reg tweaks to deal with Libraries. However, I was interested to see the
    code above. Do you know of a list anywhere which contains an explanation of
    what all those hex numbers in curly brackets do? Code lines 4 - 8 are
    effectively identical except for the hex, so it is not at all obvious what
    the lines do. I already use a modified shortcut (C:/Windows\explorer.exe
    /e,::{20d04fe0-3aea-1069-a2d8-08002b30309d}) so that Explorer opens at
    Computer rather than Libraries (there's a surprise!), but wondered if there
    are any other useful modifications that could be made to shortcuts by adding
    {hex} at the end.

    --

    Jeff
     
  11. Jeff Layman

    Jeff Layman Flightless Bird

    "Dave-UK" <Here@Home.com> wrote in message
    news:vLednaKPxqAq5ObRnZ2dnUVZ8imdnZ2d@giganews.com...
    >
    > "Jeff Layman" <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:i5fs9v$8gn$1@news.albasani.net...
    >> "Zombie Elvis" <DELETEMETOREPLYrobertocastillo@ameritech.net> wrote in
    >> message news:998m76lusij205fu0l9t7e0g1s8jmsfoac@4ax.com...
    >>> On Sun, 29 Aug 2010 21:38:04 -0400, Stan Brown
    >>> <the_stan_brown@fastmail.fm> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    >>>>used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    >>>>on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    >>>>Windows 7?
    >>>>
    >>>>Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    >>>>the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    >>>>search terms.
    >>>
    >>> It's just a way to put all of your files in one place. Or rather it's
    >>> a way to leave them right where they are but to create pointers to
    >>> them so you can for example have separate heirarchies on separate
    >>> drives but still have one place where you can access all of them. This
    >>> is especially useful if you have a file server at home or a big
    >>> external hard drive with a lot of different files.

    >>
    >> I don't have any use for Libraries either.
    >>
    >> I thought they contained just harmless links to files - sort of like
    >> shortcuts, where you can delete a shortcut without deleting the original
    >> file. But those files in the Libraries folders are real - I just tried
    >> deleting a picture file and it got deleted from a "My Pictures" folder.
    >> Had to restore it from the recycle bin.
    >>
    >> So I've now removed all folders from the Libraries folder (pity I can't
    >> delete it, too).
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Jeff

    >
    > You can remove the Libraries if you want to:
    > http://www.askvg.com/how-to-disable-libraries-feature-in-windows-7/
    >


    Yes, I am aware of various reg editing methods to remove it, but it always
    seems a "sledgehammer to crack a nut" method to edit the registry for such
    things. Still, if MS didn't build things unnecessarily in reinforced
    concrete it would be necessary!

    Looks like an interesting site. I'll have a look through it to see if there
    is anything else I can make use of. Thanks for the link.

    --

    Jeff
     
  12. Gordon

    Gordon Flightless Bird

    On 30/08/2010 12:10, Jeff Layman wrote:
    >
    >
    > Do you know of a list anywhere which contains an explanation
    > of what all those hex numbers in curly brackets do? Code lines 4 - 8 are
    > effectively identical except for the hex, so it is not at all obvious
    > what the lines do. I already use a modified shortcut
    > (C:/Windows\explorer.exe /e,::{20d04fe0-3aea-1069-a2d8-08002b30309d}) so
    > that Explorer opens at Computer rather than Libraries (there's a
    > surprise!), but wondered if there are any other useful modifications
    > that could be made to shortcuts by adding {hex} at the end.
    >


    I don't I'm afraid.
    Here's the site I got it from:
    http://www.mydigitallife.info/2009/...and-remove-libraries-from-windows-7-explorer/

    and here's another one I found immediately after I'd posted that allows
    you to just "hide" them:
    http://www.mydigitallife.info/2009/...in-the-navigation-pane-of-windows-7-explorer/
     
  13. Dave-UK

    Dave-UK Flightless Bird

    "Jeff Layman" <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote in message news:i5g419$k9q$2@news.albasani.net...
    >
    > "Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >>
    >> Alternatively, copy and paste the following code into a text editor such as Notepad, and save as
    >> a file name with .reg extension, then double click to run the .reg file.
    >>
    >> Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
    >>
    >> [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Desktop\NameSpace\{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}]
    >> [-HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}]
    >> [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\CLSID\{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}]
    >> [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{2112AB0A-C86A-4ffe-A368-0DE96E47012E}]
    >> [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{491E922F-5643-4af4-A7EB-4E7A138D8174}]
    >> [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{7b0db17d-9cd2-4a93-9733-46cc89022e7c}]
    >> [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{A302545D-DEFF-464b-ABE8-61C8648D939B}]
    >> [-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions\{A990AE9F-A03B-4e80-94BC-9912D7504104}]
    >> [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\HideDesktopIcons\NewStartPanel]
    >> “{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}”=-

    >
    > A bit of an OT reply. As I pointed out to Dave-UK, I am aware of various reg tweaks to deal with
    > Libraries. However, I was interested to see the code above. Do you know of a list anywhere which
    > contains an explanation of what all those hex numbers in curly brackets do? Code lines 4 - 8 are
    > effectively identical except for the hex, so it is not at all obvious what the lines do. I
    > already use a modified shortcut (C:/Windows\explorer.exe
    > /e,::{20d04fe0-3aea-1069-a2d8-08002b30309d}) so that Explorer opens at Computer rather than
    > Libraries (there's a surprise!), but wondered if there are any other useful modifications that
    > could be made to shortcuts by adding {hex} at the end.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Jeff


    For a list of folders go to the key mentioned in the reg file:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FolderDescriptions
    If you look at 0AC0837C-BBF8-452A-850D-79D08E667CA7 on the left pane you'll see
    that on the right pane it's described as MyComputerFolder.
    And it's ParsingName turns out to be the number you have set Explorer to open at.

    The numbers inside the curly brackets (braces) are CLSID keys.
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms886195.aspx
    http://www.thewindowsclub.com/the-secret-behind-the-windows-7-godmode

    If you look carefully at the lines of the regfile they all have a minus sign , [-HKEY_LOCAL,
    at the beginning of the key name, except the last line.
    That means delete that key, the keys being on the left pane of Regedit.
    So the reg file would delete all those keys (and all the data held in them).
    The last line has a value in quotes on one side of an equals sign and a minus
    sign on the other side:
    “{031E4825-7B94-4dc3-B131-E946B44C8DD5}”=-
    That means delete that value, the values being on the right pane of Regedit.
    The key is left untouched but one of the values it holds will be deleted.
    (Keys contain values and values contain data.)
     
  14. Jeff Layman

    Jeff Layman Flightless Bird

    "Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:i5g7l2$v3q$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > On 30/08/2010 12:10, Jeff Layman wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> Do you know of a list anywhere which contains an explanation
    >> of what all those hex numbers in curly brackets do? Code lines 4 - 8 are
    >> effectively identical except for the hex, so it is not at all obvious
    >> what the lines do. I already use a modified shortcut
    >> (C:/Windows\explorer.exe /e,::{20d04fe0-3aea-1069-a2d8-08002b30309d}) so
    >> that Explorer opens at Computer rather than Libraries (there's a
    >> surprise!), but wondered if there are any other useful modifications
    >> that could be made to shortcuts by adding {hex} at the end.
    >>

    >
    > I don't I'm afraid.
    > Here's the site I got it from:
    > http://www.mydigitallife.info/2009/...and-remove-libraries-from-windows-7-explorer/
    >
    > and here's another one I found immediately after I'd posted that allows
    > you to just "hide" them:
    > http://www.mydigitallife.info/2009/...in-the-navigation-pane-of-windows-7-explorer/


    I think this is more what I was looking for:
    http://www.mydigitallife.info/2009/...cts-or-folders-when-opening-windows-explorer/
    (also see Dave's godmode link for a similar listing)

    I wonder how the authors of these webpages found this information. A
    Microsoft search of "CLSID" turned up nearly 55000 hits!

    --

    Jeff
     
  15. johnbee

    johnbee Flightless Bird

    "Stan Brown" <the_stan_brown@fastmail.fm> wrote in message
    news:MPG.26e4d58ad04f0b3798c5a9@news.individual.net...
    > Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    > used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    > on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    > Windows 7?
    >
    > Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    > the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    > search terms.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
    > http://OakRoadSystems.com
    > Shikata ga nai...


    I am afraid that Windows 7 is deliberately designed to accommodate many
    users on the one machine, together with various software applications each
    of which saved by default all over the place in previous Windows versions.
    The library concept is designed to try to get over the need for users to
    design their own storage directory system. Obviously you can see that each
    user doing their own thing would result in a bit of a mish mash. It is a
    pain in the nuts for single users, and I don't think they have got it right
    for a few users.

    However, the directory structure is a crucial aspect of designing a system
    and at least in Windows 7 it looks as though they have had a try at
    realising this instead of just creating a new sub-directory whenever the
    thought arises. Also, even now it is still the case that most stuff is not
    made specifically for Windows 7 - it is rare to be asked on installation
    whether it is for all users for example.

    So if you like storing things your own way I don't think that the library
    idea will offer anything. However, if doing things for other people on
    their machines, it is actually important to take into account what Windows 7
    does by default because users are likely to fairly quickly get used to how
    Win 7 works and you don't want your applications to be out of kilter.
     
  16. johnbee

    johnbee Flightless Bird

    < "Jeff Layman" <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:i5g419$k9q$2@news.albasani.net...

    I already use a modified shortcut (C:/Windows\explorer.exe
    /e,::{20d04fe0-3aea-1069-a2d8-08002b30309d}) so that Explorer opens at
    Computer rather than Libraries >

    I would be grateful if you would expand that comment a little. When I
    choose Computer (I have a desktop icon for it), it immediately shows
    diagrams of the drives so I can navigate to where I want to go by a double
    click on the main hard disk. In the left window (I think I am supposed to
    call it pane) is a long list of various places (starting with desktop) which
    is supposed to give a quicker browse I suppose but I rarely click on
    anything other than desktop.

    However, that is how it worked on installation - and is how I like it.

    In short, then, are you saying that when you choose Computer it only showed
    you a library?
     
  17. Jeff Layman

    Jeff Layman Flightless Bird

    "johnbee" <johnbrockbank@com.invalid> wrote in message
    news:i5goj0$f1m$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >
    > < "Jeff Layman" <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:i5g419$k9q$2@news.albasani.net...
    >
    > I already use a modified shortcut (C:/Windows\explorer.exe
    > /e,::{20d04fe0-3aea-1069-a2d8-08002b30309d}) so that Explorer opens at
    > Computer rather than Libraries >
    >
    > I would be grateful if you would expand that comment a little. When I
    > choose Computer (I have a desktop icon for it), it immediately shows
    > diagrams of the drives so I can navigate to where I want to go by a double
    > click on the main hard disk. In the left window (I think I am supposed to
    > call it pane) is a long list of various places (starting with desktop)
    > which is supposed to give a quicker browse I suppose but I rarely click on
    > anything other than desktop.
    >
    > However, that is how it worked on installation - and is how I like it.
    >
    > In short, then, are you saying that when you choose Computer it only
    > showed you a library?


    No. If I clicked on a (Microsoft) default shortcut to Windows Explorer, it
    opened WE at "Libraries", with that folder highlighted. As I never use
    Libraries, it was a waste of time, so I just substituted the "Target" field
    in the shortcut with the one I posted.

    --

    Jeff
     
  18. Stan Brown

    Stan Brown Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 30 Aug 2010 10:28:21 +0100, Dave-UK wrote:

    > You can remove the Libraries if you want to:
    > http://www.askvg.com/how-to-disable-libraries-feature-in-windows-7/


    Thanks, Dave (and others who responded). That article also links to
    this one:
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee449406(WS.10).aspx
    which is an understandable rundown on libraries.

    As far as I can see, a library of music is good if you have music
    files scattered around and want to access them all together. But who
    *does* have music files scattered around? Mine are all in iTunes.

    Ditto for pictures -- I have folders set up for my own shots and
    various topics, and I have no trouble finding a particular picture.

    I may still be missing the point, but at this point it looks to me
    like libraries are for people who don't have their own scheme for
    organizing their files.

    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com
    Shikata ga nai...
     
  19. Stan Brown

    Stan Brown Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 29 Aug 2010 21:44:38 -0700, Frank wrote:
    >
    > On 8/29/2010 6:38 PM, Stan Brown wrote:
    > > Can someone explain briefly why I would want to use them> I never
    > > used My Documents in Windows XP, but had my own hierarchy of folders
    > > on drives E and F. Am I missing anything by not using libraries in
    > > Windows 7?
    > >
    > > Windows 7's own help doesn't seem to explain anything useful about
    > > the purpose of this feature, or if it does I wasn't using the proper
    > > search terms.
    > >
    > >

    > http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/features/libraries


    Nice -- short explanations of a lot of the Win 7 features. Thanks!

    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com
    Shikata ga nai...
     
  20. Stan Brown

    Stan Brown Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 30 Aug 2010 17:55:31 +0100, johnbee wrote:
    > So if you like storing things your own way I don't think that the library
    > idea will offer anything.


    Thanks, John. I've been coming to that conclusion based on what I
    read in this thread and in the referenced articles. As the only user
    on my PC, I think my traditional directory structure will continue to
    serve me well.

    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com
    Shikata ga nai...
     

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