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Urgent! Virus Attack

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Just Me, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. Just Me

    Just Me Flightless Bird

    I've never seen anything so dirty and diabolical.

    1. Pop-ups started to appear warning of a virus attack.
    2. I clicked "okay" to open my protection software.
    3. What loaded was NOT my program! The graphics were way CRUDE, the
    English grammar was defective. Mine is the free Microsoft virus and
    spyware scan--forget the name, and can't find it now because it's
    GONE, replaced with this fake job.
    4. Meanwhile, every program on the desktop I tried to load, every
    website was refused with an "error" message, declaring that the
    program was "infected". I could not so much as get Vista Help to load.
    Worst of all, the notepad file containing my passwords, though it
    would start to open, WHACK, down it goes with another "error" message.
    5. In desperation, I finally clicked okay to "my" virus protection
    program, offering to remove the virus.
    6. A webpage loads! No other pages would load, but this one does,
    offering to sell me one of three virus protection programs.
    7. I refuse that, close the program.
    8. A porno site loads to replace the "virus software" page!!!
    --
    That's my Toshiba laptop. So I put the RESTORE disk into the DVD slot
    and what do I find? There's no "restore point" feature! Two options
    are offered: a complete restore, deleting all files, with a return to
    the default condition of the computer, OR an option to reload certain
    default program files.

    Still desperate, I almost clicked the full restore. Since most of my
    text work is saved on-line, like in the Drafts folder of my Gmail
    account, I'm not sweating that stuff. It's that Notepad password file
    I don't want to lose, let alone a vast collection of Favorites. So
    here's what I need to know . . .

    Is there a program in this, my Desktop Sony VAIO with XP that will
    allow me SAFE access to my infected laptop hard-drive with Vista, via
    USB cable? A computer to computer file transfer program is what I'm
    after. The desktop is running McAfee virus protection which I will
    make sure is totally up to date before I attempt any such transfer.

    Your help will be sooo greatly appreciated.
    --
    John
     
  2. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    On 08/20/2010 11:11 AM, Just Me wrote:
    > I've never seen anything so dirty and diabolical.
    >
    > 1. Pop-ups started to appear warning of a virus attack.
    > 2. I clicked "okay" to open my protection software.
    > 3. What loaded was NOT my program! The graphics were way CRUDE, the
    > English grammar was defective. Mine is the free Microsoft virus and
    > spyware scan--forget the name, and can't find it now because it's
    > GONE, replaced with this fake job.
    > 4. Meanwhile, every program on the desktop I tried to load, every
    > website was refused with an "error" message, declaring that the
    > program was "infected". I could not so much as get Vista Help to load.
    > Worst of all, the notepad file containing my passwords, though it
    > would start to open, WHACK, down it goes with another "error" message.
    > 5. In desperation, I finally clicked okay to "my" virus protection
    > program, offering to remove the virus.
    > 6. A webpage loads! No other pages would load, but this one does,
    > offering to sell me one of three virus protection programs.
    > 7. I refuse that, close the program.
    > 8. A porno site loads to replace the "virus software" page!!!
    > --
    > That's my Toshiba laptop. So I put the RESTORE disk into the DVD slot
    > and what do I find? There's no "restore point" feature! Two options
    > are offered: a complete restore, deleting all files, with a return to
    > the default condition of the computer, OR an option to reload certain
    > default program files.
    >
    > Still desperate, I almost clicked the full restore. Since most of my
    > text work is saved on-line, like in the Drafts folder of my Gmail
    > account, I'm not sweating that stuff. It's that Notepad password file
    > I don't want to lose, let alone a vast collection of Favorites. So
    > here's what I need to know . . .
    >
    > Is there a program in this, my Desktop Sony VAIO with XP that will
    > allow me SAFE access to my infected laptop hard-drive with Vista, via
    > USB cable? A computer to computer file transfer program is what I'm
    > after. The desktop is running McAfee virus protection which I will
    > make sure is totally up to date before I attempt any such transfer.
    >
    > Your help will be sooo greatly appreciated.
    > --
    > John


    Download Ubuntu from www.ubuntu.com. Burn the ISO to a CD. Run the Live
    CD without installing Ubuntu and use it to transfer your files to
    external media like an external hard drive. Once you're done, DON'T
    reinstall McAfee as it's one of the worst anti virus programs out there.
    Install Microsoft's AV "Security Essentials" or Avast, both free.

    --
    Alias
     
  3. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    "Just Me" <jpdm45@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4d7a7f9e-a7b8-46e9-a5e2-912e8251c926@f6g2000yqa.googlegroups.com...
    > I've never seen anything so dirty and diabolical.
    >
    > 1. Pop-ups started to appear warning of a virus attack.
    > 2. I clicked "okay" to open my protection software.
    > 3. What loaded was NOT my program! The graphics were way CRUDE, the
    > English grammar was defective. Mine is the free Microsoft virus and
    > spyware scan--forget the name, and can't find it now because it's
    > GONE, replaced with this fake job.
    > 4. Meanwhile, every program on the desktop I tried to load, every
    > website was refused with an "error" message, declaring that the
    > program was "infected". I could not so much as get Vista Help to load.
    > Worst of all, the notepad file containing my passwords, though it
    > would start to open, WHACK, down it goes with another "error" message.
    > 5. In desperation, I finally clicked okay to "my" virus protection
    > program, offering to remove the virus.
    > 6. A webpage loads! No other pages would load, but this one does,
    > offering to sell me one of three virus protection programs.
    > 7. I refuse that, close the program.
    > 8. A porno site loads to replace the "virus software" page!!!
    > --
    > That's my Toshiba laptop. So I put the RESTORE disk into the DVD slot
    > and what do I find? There's no "restore point" feature! Two options
    > are offered: a complete restore, deleting all files, with a return to
    > the default condition of the computer, OR an option to reload certain
    > default program files.
    >
    > Still desperate, I almost clicked the full restore. Since most of my
    > text work is saved on-line, like in the Drafts folder of my Gmail
    > account, I'm not sweating that stuff. It's that Notepad password file
    > I don't want to lose, let alone a vast collection of Favorites. So
    > here's what I need to know . . .
    >
    > Is there a program in this, my Desktop Sony VAIO with XP that will
    > allow me SAFE access to my infected laptop hard-drive with Vista, via
    > USB cable? A computer to computer file transfer program is what I'm
    > after. The desktop is running McAfee virus protection which I will
    > make sure is totally up to date before I attempt any such transfer.
    >
    > Your help will be sooo greatly appreciated.
    > --
    > John


    Here are a few options:
    a) Remove the disk, then put it into a USB case which you connect to some
    other PC.
    b) Boot the machine with a Bart PE boot CD, then copy your files to an
    external USB mass storage device.
    c) Boot the machine with a Windows 7 Repair CD, then copy your files to an
    external USB mass storage device.

    a) is probably easiest if you can remove the disk.
    b) requires a bit of an effort until you can figure out how to make a Bart
    PE boot CD.
    c) is easy but it takes a while to download the image file from
    http://neosmart.net/blog/2009/windows-7-system-repair-discs/.

    Note also that b) and c) require a good knowledge of console commands.

    You should treat this event as a wake-up call. Important files *must* be
    backed up regularly to an external medium. Next time, if your disk goes bad,
    you might lose the lot.
     
  4. PA Bear [MS MVP]

    PA Bear [MS MVP] Flightless Bird

    You do NOT want to connect ANY computer to the infected computer!

    Any flash drives, SDCards or other external drives which have been connected
    (or are connected) to the infected computer should also be considered
    infected!
    --
    ~Robear Dyer (PA Bear)
    MS MVP-IE, Mail, Security, Windows Client - since 2002

    Just Me wrote:
    > I've never seen anything so dirty and diabolical.
    >
    > 1. Pop-ups started to appear warning of a virus attack.
    > 2. I clicked "okay" to open my protection software.
    > 3. What loaded was NOT my program! The graphics were way CRUDE, the
    > English grammar was defective. Mine is the free Microsoft virus and
    > spyware scan--forget the name, and can't find it now because it's
    > GONE, replaced with this fake job.
    > 4. Meanwhile, every program on the desktop I tried to load, every
    > website was refused with an "error" message, declaring that the
    > program was "infected". I could not so much as get Vista Help to load.
    > Worst of all, the notepad file containing my passwords, though it
    > would start to open, WHACK, down it goes with another "error" message.
    > 5. In desperation, I finally clicked okay to "my" virus protection
    > program, offering to remove the virus.
    > 6. A webpage loads! No other pages would load, but this one does,
    > offering to sell me one of three virus protection programs.
    > 7. I refuse that, close the program.
    > 8. A porno site loads to replace the "virus software" page!!!
    > --
    > That's my Toshiba laptop. So I put the RESTORE disk into the DVD slot
    > and what do I find? There's no "restore point" feature! Two options
    > are offered: a complete restore, deleting all files, with a return to
    > the default condition of the computer, OR an option to reload certain
    > default program files.
    >
    > Still desperate, I almost clicked the full restore. Since most of my
    > text work is saved on-line, like in the Drafts folder of my Gmail
    > account, I'm not sweating that stuff. It's that Notepad password file
    > I don't want to lose, let alone a vast collection of Favorites. So
    > here's what I need to know . . .
    >
    > Is there a program in this, my Desktop Sony VAIO with XP that will
    > allow me SAFE access to my infected laptop hard-drive with Vista, via
    > USB cable? A computer to computer file transfer program is what I'm
    > after. The desktop is running McAfee virus protection which I will
    > make sure is totally up to date before I attempt any such transfer.
    >
    > Your help will be sooo greatly appreciated.
     
  5. Just Me

    Just Me Flightless Bird

    On Aug 20, 4:54 am, Alias <aka@masked&anonymous.com.¡nvalido> wrote:

    >
    > Download Ubuntu fromwww.ubuntu.com. Burn the ISO to a CD. Run the Live
    > CD without installing Ubuntu and use it to transfer your files to
    > external media like an external hard drive.


    Thanks! A whole bunch. Looks like you are cautioning against a direct
    connection between the laptop and desktop. So, unless I miss my guess
    you are saying not to trust my virus software to scan those files as
    the transfer is in process--maybe because there is no signature file
    for this virus, it's that new, or . . .

    > Once you're done, DON'T
    > reinstall McAfee as it's one of the worst anti virus programs out there.
    > Install Microsoft's AV "Security Essentials" or Avast, both free.


    Yeah. "Security Essentials". See, that's what I have--or had till last
    night--on my laptop. When Microsoft offered it, I took it and
    uninstalled my free AVG. McAfee is what's on my (presently)
    uninfected desktop. Glad you named it, so now I can add to this the
    horrible fact that the FAKE virus program (that came with the virus)
    is a clone of "Security Essentials", displaying that trademark and
    logo--only the graphics are totally suckola. So you're sitting there
    thinking, "What? This is NOT the way these windows looked before, not
    AT ALL, and as mentioned, the English grammar is stinko, and appears
    to be from a non-English speaking source.

    They offer to sell you one of three flavors, the 3 month "protection"
    for 49 bucks! The 6 month for 59 bucks, and then it's like, the
    eternal protection for 69 bucks. Also, there is no Microsoft Logo
    anywhere on the screen. Right away, I'm thinking, if MS says it's
    "free" -- what's this?

    Again: Big Thanks!
    --
    John
     
  6. Just Me

    Just Me Flightless Bird

    On Aug 20, 10:28 am, "PA Bear [MS MVP]" <PABear...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > You do NOT want to connect ANY computer to the infected computer!
    >
    > Any flash drives, SDCards or other external drives which have been connected
    > (or are connected) to the infected computer should also be considered
    > infected!
    > --
    > ~Robear Dyer (PA Bear)
    > MS MVP-IE, Mail, Security, Windows Client - since 2002


    Okay! That's how I want to hear it stated: in NO uncertain terms.

    Thanks!!

    Now a question re: Ubuntu. Is that strictly a file transfer program--
    or will it open a text file for viewing? Otherwise, is there any
    software (free, preferably) that will permit you to do that from the
    DVD drive--so you can get around the feature of that virus which stops
    all files from executing? All I need is to get into my text files, and
    the desktop folders I keep my web shortcuts in.

    Any help for that?
    --
    John
     
  7. Greg Russell

    Greg Russell Flightless Bird

    "Just Me" <jpdm45@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4d7a7f9e-a7b8-46e9-a5e2-912e8251c926@f6g2000yqa.googlegroups.com...

    > I've never seen anything so dirty and diabolical.


    You must've just started using the Internet.

    > 1. Pop-ups started to appear warning of a virus attack.


    It's called "scare-ware" and is simple programming by any teen-aged web
    author.

    > 2. I clicked "okay" to open my protection software.


    No, you chose to download and execute their virus-installation program.
    Lerning to rede is guuuud!
     
  8. Just Me

    Just Me Flightless Bird

    On Aug 20, 4:57 am, "Pegasus [MVP]" <n...@microsoft.com> wrote:

    > Here are a few options:
    > a) Remove the disk, then put it into a USB case which you connect to some
    > other PC.
    > b) Boot the machine with a Bart PE boot CD, then copy your files to an
    > external USB mass storage device.
    > c) Boot the machine with a Windows 7 Repair CD, then copy your files to an
    > external USB mass storage device.
    >
    > a) is probably easiest if you can remove the disk.
    > b) requires a bit of an effort until you can figure out how to make a Bart
    > PE boot CD.
    > c) is easy but it takes a while to download the image file fromhttp://neosmart.net/blog/2009/windows-7-system-repair-discs/.
    >
    > Note also that b) and c) require a good knowledge of console commands.
    >
    > You should treat this event as a wake-up call. Important files *must* be
    > backed up regularly to an external medium. Next time, if your disk goes bad,
    > you might lose the lot.


    You got that right. Wake up call for sure. If I can get those
    passwords, I'll print that file, frame it, and hang it on the wall, if
    I have to, or see if I can get a safety deposit box for it at Fort
    Knox. Fortunately, I had no trouble getting my NetFlix password reset.
    All they wanted was my email addy.

    HAS ANYONE HERE HAD WORD OF THIS MONSTER VIRUS/VIRUS PROTECTION SCAM?
    Or anything similar?
    --
    John
     
  9. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    On 08/20/2010 05:45 PM, Just Me wrote:
    > On Aug 20, 10:28 am, "PA Bear [MS MVP]"<PABear...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> You do NOT want to connect ANY computer to the infected computer!
    >>
    >> Any flash drives, SDCards or other external drives which have been connected
    >> (or are connected) to the infected computer should also be considered
    >> infected!
    >> --
    >> ~Robear Dyer (PA Bear)
    >> MS MVP-IE, Mail, Security, Windows Client - since 2002

    >
    > Okay! That's how I want to hear it stated: in NO uncertain terms.
    >
    > Thanks!!
    >
    > Now a question re: Ubuntu. Is that strictly a file transfer program--
    > or will it open a text file for viewing?


    Yes. You can also go online and copy the text to a web email and send it
    to yourself. The Live CD comes with a word processor and Firefox for
    surfing. All without installing *anything* on your hard drive. It uses
    memory and the Live CD to do things.

    > Otherwise, is there any
    > software (free, preferably) that will permit you to do that from the
    > DVD drive--so you can get around the feature of that virus which stops
    > all files from executing? All I need is to get into my text files, and
    > the desktop folders I keep my web shortcuts in.
    >
    > Any help for that?
    > --
    > John


    The good thing about using the Ubuntu CD is that Ubuntu doesn't do
    viruses that are created for Windows. When you first boot the Ubuntu CD,
    be sure and choose to load it without installing it.

    --
    Alias
     
  10. Craven Moorehead

    Craven Moorehead Flightless Bird

    HAS ANYONE HERE HAD WORD OF THIS MONSTER VIRUS/VIRUS PROTECTION SCAM?
    Or anything similar?
    --
    John

    Where have you been all these years? This crap has been around forever.
     
  11. Just Me

    Just Me Flightless Bird

    On Aug 20, 11:23 am, Alias <aka@masked&anonymous.com.¡nvalido> wrote:
    > On 08/20/2010 05:45 PM, Just Me wrote:


    > > Now a question re: Ubuntu.  Is that strictly a file transfer program--
    > > or will it open a text file for viewing?

    >
    > Yes. You can also go online and copy the text to a web email and send it
    > to yourself. The Live CD comes with a word processor and Firefox for
    > surfing. All without installing *anything* on your hard drive. It uses
    > memory and the Live CD to do things.


    Wow! No, I mean, Double Pow, How Now Brown Super Cow WOW!!!!!

    That's going to solve ALL my problems.

    >
    > > Otherwise, is there any
    > > software (free, preferably) that will permit you to do that from the
    > > DVD drive--so you can get around the feature of that virus which stops
    > > all files from executing? All I need is to get into my text files, and
    > > the desktop folders I keep my web shortcuts in.

    >
    > > Any help for that?
    > > --
    > > John

    >
    > The good thing about using the Ubuntu CD is that Ubuntu doesn't do
    > viruses that are created for Windows. When you first boot the Ubuntu CD,
    > be sure and choose to load it without installing it.


    Man, that is really something. And no problem with the platform
    difference between XP and Vista -- I take it? I'll be downloading
    Ubuntu to XP, and using the CD on Vista.

    Alias --

    Thanks a million, man. :)
    --
    JM
     
  12. PA Bear [MS MVP]

    PA Bear [MS MVP] Flightless Bird

    Avoid Rogue Security Software!
    http://www.microsoft.com/security/antivirus/rogue.aspx
    --
    ~Robear Dyer (PA Bear)
    MS MVP-IE, Mail, Security, Windows Client - since 2002

    Craven Moorehead wrote:
    > HAS ANYONE HERE HAD WORD OF THIS MONSTER VIRUS/VIRUS PROTECTION SCAM?
    > Or anything similar?
     
  13. Elmo

    Elmo Flightless Bird

    Just Me wrote:
    > I've never seen anything so dirty and diabolical.
    >
    > 1. Pop-ups started to appear warning of a virus attack.
    > 2. I clicked "okay" to open my protection software.
    > 3. What loaded was NOT my program! The graphics were way CRUDE, the
    > English grammar was defective. Mine is the free Microsoft virus and
    > spyware scan--forget the name, and can't find it now because it's
    > GONE, replaced with this fake job.
    > 4. Meanwhile, every program on the desktop I tried to load, every
    > website was refused with an "error" message, declaring that the
    > program was "infected". I could not so much as get Vista Help to load.
    > Worst of all, the notepad file containing my passwords, though it
    > would start to open, WHACK, down it goes with another "error" message.
    > 5. In desperation, I finally clicked okay to "my" virus protection
    > program, offering to remove the virus.
    > 6. A webpage loads! No other pages would load, but this one does,
    > offering to sell me one of three virus protection programs.
    > 7. I refuse that, close the program.
    > 8. A porno site loads to replace the "virus software" page!!!
    > --
    > That's my Toshiba laptop. So I put the RESTORE disk into the DVD slot
    > and what do I find? There's no "restore point" feature! Two options
    > are offered: a complete restore, deleting all files, with a return to
    > the default condition of the computer, OR an option to reload certain
    > default program files.
    >
    > Still desperate, I almost clicked the full restore. Since most of my
    > text work is saved on-line, like in the Drafts folder of my Gmail
    > account, I'm not sweating that stuff. It's that Notepad password file
    > I don't want to lose, let alone a vast collection of Favorites. So
    > here's what I need to know . . .
    >
    > Is there a program in this, my Desktop Sony VAIO with XP that will
    > allow me SAFE access to my infected laptop hard-drive with Vista, via
    > USB cable? A computer to computer file transfer program is what I'm
    > after. The desktop is running McAfee virus protection which I will
    > make sure is totally up to date before I attempt any such transfer.
    >
    > Your help will be sooo greatly appreciated.
    > --
    > John


    Download the Avira Antivir Rescue System program which will burn a CD
    image to a blank CD. It's updated a few times per day. Insert the CD
    into the damaged machine and let it do a scan of your system. Before
    starting the scan, select "Configuration" and set to repair or rename
    the infected files. Sometimes your machine won't restart after such a
    repair process, so you might want to save needed files to another system
    before using this. If you can't, then you can move the hard drive to
    another machine to copy needed files. You can do that before, or after
    this scan.

    http://www.free-av.com/en/tools/12/avira_antivir_rescue_system.html

    Then run these:

    Malwarebytes© Corporation
    http://www.malwarebytes.org/mbam/program/mbam-setup.exe

    SuperAntispyware
    http://www.superantispyware.com/superantispywarefreevspro.html

    AVG now has a Rescue CD that's free. They also have a free USB download
    that should work on newer systems that can boot from a USB device. Get
    them here:

    http://www.avg.com/us-en/avg-rescue-cd

    You can try some of the CD's mentioned at the following site.
    BitDefender was my favorite, but if the infected machine can't connect
    to the internet to get updates, Avira comes with current virus
    definitions. Also, some of these just won't run on some systems,
    perhaps because there's no drivers available for some system devices,
    motherboard, graphics card, etc. So try a few of these till you find
    one that works:

    Burn BitDefender, or another program listed at the link below, to a CD
    (using a working machine) and test the infected machine with it.
    BitDefender also has a Rootkit checker on the Linux Desktop; run it if
    you think that's the problem:

    http://www.techmixer.com/free-bootable-antivirus-rescue-cds-download-list/

    Download the executable rather than the .iso image, if one is available,
    (though no .exe is available for BitDefender).

    After the scan is run, if you elect to quarantine files, they're
    quarantined to RAM and lost after you reboot. You'll need to copy any
    quarantined files to the hard drive, a thumb drive or elsewhere before
    exiting.

    --

    Joe =o)
     
  14. Just Me

    Just Me Flightless Bird

    On Aug 20, 1:15 pm, Elmo <elmog...@xxx.invalid> wrote:

    > Download the Avira Antivir Rescue System program which will burn a CD
    > image to a blank CD.  It's updated a few times per day.  Insert the CD
    > into the damaged machine and let it do a scan of your system.  Before
    > starting the scan, select "Configuration" and set to repair or rename
    > the infected files.  Sometimes your machine won't restart after such a
    > repair process, so you might want to save needed files to another system
    > before using this.  If you can't, then you can move the hard drive to
    > another machine to copy needed files.  You can do that before, or after
    > this scan.
    >
    > http://www.free-av.com/en/tools/12/avira_antivir_rescue_system.html
    >
    > Then run these:
    >
    > Malwarebytes© Corporationhttp://www.malwarebytes.org/mbam/program/mbam-setup.exe
    >
    > SuperAntispywarehttp://www.superantispyware.com/superantispywarefreevspro..html
    >
    > AVG now has a Rescue CD that's free.  They also have a free USB download
    > that should work on newer systems that can boot from a USB device.  Get
    > them here:
    >
    > http://www.avg.com/us-en/avg-rescue-cd
    >
    > You can try some of the CD's mentioned at the following site.
    > BitDefender was my favorite, but if the infected machine can't connect
    > to the internet to get updates, Avira comes with current virus
    > definitions.  Also, some of these just won't run on some systems,
    > perhaps because there's no drivers available for some system devices,
    > motherboard, graphics card, etc.  So try a few of these till you find
    > one that works:
    >
    > Burn BitDefender, or another program listed at the link below, to a CD
    > (using a working machine) and test the infected machine with it.
    > BitDefender also has a Rootkit checker on the Linux Desktop; run it if
    > you think that's the problem:
    >
    > http://www.techmixer.com/free-bootable-antivirus-rescue-cds-download-...
    >
    > Download the executable rather than the .iso image, if one is available,
    > (though no .exe is available for BitDefender).
    >
    > After the scan is run, if you elect to quarantine files, they're
    > quarantined to RAM and lost after you reboot.  You'll need to copy any
    > quarantined files to the hard drive, a thumb drive or elsewhere before
    > exiting.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Joe   =o)


    Thanks Joe! Appreciate the time you put into that, whenever you did
    it, just now or earlier for other people in my fix. That's quite the
    deal about the scan, with Avira -- although the problem of maybe not
    being able to reboot does concern me. What's your view of the Ubuntu
    application that Alias is talking about?
    --
    John
     
  15. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    On 08/20/2010 06:51 PM, Just Me wrote:
    > On Aug 20, 11:23 am, Alias<aka@masked&anonymous.com.¡nvalido> wrote:
    >> On 08/20/2010 05:45 PM, Just Me wrote:

    >
    >>> Now a question re: Ubuntu. Is that strictly a file transfer program--
    >>> or will it open a text file for viewing?

    >>
    >> Yes. You can also go online and copy the text to a web email and send it
    >> to yourself. The Live CD comes with a word processor and Firefox for
    >> surfing. All without installing *anything* on your hard drive. It uses
    >> memory and the Live CD to do things.

    >
    > Wow! No, I mean, Double Pow, How Now Brown Super Cow WOW!!!!!
    >
    > That's going to solve ALL my problems.
    >
    >>
    >>> Otherwise, is there any
    >>> software (free, preferably) that will permit you to do that from the
    >>> DVD drive--so you can get around the feature of that virus which stops
    >>> all files from executing? All I need is to get into my text files, and
    >>> the desktop folders I keep my web shortcuts in.

    >>
    >>> Any help for that?
    >>> --
    >>> John

    >>
    >> The good thing about using the Ubuntu CD is that Ubuntu doesn't do
    >> viruses that are created for Windows. When you first boot the Ubuntu CD,
    >> be sure and choose to load it without installing it.

    >
    > Man, that is really something. And no problem with the platform
    > difference between XP and Vista -- I take it? I'll be downloading
    > Ubuntu to XP, and using the CD on Vista.


    The .iso image can be burned just fine to a CD using XP. I've done it
    many times.

    >
    > Alias --
    >
    > Thanks a million, man. :)
    > --
    > JM


    Sure, let me know how it goes.
    --
    Alias
     
  16. Elmo

    Elmo Flightless Bird

    Just Me wrote:
    > On Aug 20, 1:15 pm, Elmo <elmog...@xxx.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> Download the Avira Antivir Rescue System program which will burn a CD
    >> image to a blank CD. It's updated a few times per day. Insert the CD
    >> into the damaged machine and let it do a scan of your system. Before
    >> starting the scan, select "Configuration" and set to repair or rename
    >> the infected files. Sometimes your machine won't restart after such a
    >> repair process, so you might want to save needed files to another system
    >> before using this. If you can't, then you can move the hard drive to
    >> another machine to copy needed files. You can do that before, or after
    >> this scan.
    >>
    >> http://www.free-av.com/en/tools/12/avira_antivir_rescue_system.html
    >>
    >> Then run these:
    >>
    >> Malwarebytes© Corporationhttp://www.malwarebytes.org/mbam/program/mbam-setup.exe
    >>
    >> SuperAntispywarehttp://www.superantispyware.com/superantispywarefreevspro.html
    >>
    >> AVG now has a Rescue CD that's free. They also have a free USB download
    >> that should work on newer systems that can boot from a USB device. Get
    >> them here:
    >>
    >> http://www.avg.com/us-en/avg-rescue-cd
    >>
    >> You can try some of the CD's mentioned at the following site.
    >> BitDefender was my favorite, but if the infected machine can't connect
    >> to the internet to get updates, Avira comes with current virus
    >> definitions. Also, some of these just won't run on some systems,
    >> perhaps because there's no drivers available for some system devices,
    >> motherboard, graphics card, etc. So try a few of these till you find
    >> one that works:
    >>
    >> Burn BitDefender, or another program listed at the link below, to a CD
    >> (using a working machine) and test the infected machine with it.
    >> BitDefender also has a Rootkit checker on the Linux Desktop; run it if
    >> you think that's the problem:
    >>
    >> http://www.techmixer.com/free-bootable-antivirus-rescue-cds-download-...
    >>
    >> Download the executable rather than the .iso image, if one is available,
    >> (though no .exe is available for BitDefender).
    >>
    >> After the scan is run, if you elect to quarantine files, they're
    >> quarantined to RAM and lost after you reboot. You'll need to copy any
    >> quarantined files to the hard drive, a thumb drive or elsewhere before
    >> exiting.
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Joe =o)

    >
    > Thanks Joe! Appreciate the time you put into that, whenever you did
    > it, just now or earlier for other people in my fix. That's quite the
    > deal about the scan, with Avira -- although the problem of maybe not
    > being able to reboot does concern me. What's your view of the Ubuntu
    > application that Alias is talking about?


    That's fine for copying files so nothing is lost.

    Most of the CD's I suggested use Knoppix Live, which does the same
    thing: runs from RAM, so nothing on the hd is accessed. You could use
    one of them, cancel the scan and use Knoppix to copy files, then run the
    a/v.

    Knoppix won't run with some Dell computers.. I haven't discovered why,
    but believe it's related to the graphics card and, maybe Knoppix doesn't
    have compatible drivers for those cards.

    --

    Joe =o)
     
  17. Justin

    Justin Flightless Bird

    In article
    <98722c72-a8d0-45e8-8f63-dd09b1c54a0d@g17g2000yqe.googlegroups.com>,
    Just Me <jpdm45@gmail.com> wrote:

    > On Aug 20, 4:54 am, Alias <aka@masked&anonymous.com.¡nvalido> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Download Ubuntu fromwww.ubuntu.com. Burn the ISO to a CD. Run the Live
    > > CD without installing Ubuntu and use it to transfer your files to
    > > external media like an external hard drive.

    >
    > Thanks! A whole bunch. Looks like you are cautioning against a direct
    > connection between the laptop and desktop. So, unless I miss my guess
    > you are saying not to trust my virus software to scan those files as
    > the transfer is in process--maybe because there is no signature file
    > for this virus, it's that new, or . . .


    Do what he said, reformat and reinstall your operating system.
    That is the only way you can disinfect that machine and be 100% sure.
    Malwarebytes, AVG, McAfee and MSE may claim to disinfect the machine but
    it doesn't repair the damage that has already been done to the core OS.

    For your next computer get a Mac you won't have this problem.
     
  18. Just Me

    Just Me Flightless Bird

    On Aug 20, 6:20 pm, Alias <aka@masked&anonymous.com.¡nvalido> wrote:
    > On 08/20/2010 06:51 PM, Just Me wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Aug 20, 11:23 am, Alias<aka@masked&anonymous.com.¡nvalido>  wrote:
    > >> On 08/20/2010 05:45 PM, Just Me wrote:

    >
    > >>> Now a question re: Ubuntu.  Is that strictly a file transfer program--
    > >>> or will it open a text file for viewing?

    >
    > >> Yes. You can also go online and copy the text to a web email and send it
    > >> to yourself. The Live CD comes with a word processor and Firefox for
    > >> surfing. All without installing *anything* on your hard drive. It uses
    > >> memory and the Live CD to do things.

    >
    > > Wow!  No, I mean, Double Pow, How Now Brown Super Cow WOW!!!!!

    >
    > > That's going to solve ALL my problems.

    >
    > >>> Otherwise, is there any
    > >>> software (free, preferably) that will permit you to do that from the
    > >>> DVD drive--so you can get around the feature of that virus which stops
    > >>> all files from executing? All I need is to get into my text files, and
    > >>> the desktop folders I keep my web shortcuts in.

    >
    > >>> Any help for that?
    > >>> --
    > >>> John

    >
    > >> The good thing about using the Ubuntu CD is that Ubuntu doesn't do
    > >> viruses that are created for Windows. When you first boot the Ubuntu CD,
    > >> be sure and choose to load it without installing it.

    >
    > > Man, that is really something.  And no problem with the platform
    > > difference between XP and Vista -- I take it?  I'll be downloading
    > > Ubuntu to XP, and using the CD on Vista.

    >
    > The .iso image can be burned just fine to a CD using XP. I've done it
    > many times.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Alias --

    >
    > > Thanks a million, man. :)
    > > --
    > > JM

    >
    > Sure, let me know how it goes.
    > --
    > Alias


    Success! Whew. Thanks to SAFE MODE, I was able to run a SYSTEM
    RESTORE, setting the restore point at three days previous to the
    attack. Upon reboot to the full system, things were back to normal but
    for a WARNING window about "security issues" that this time I knew
    enough to ignore. I downloaded a copy of AVAST anti-virus, ran a
    complete scan and here's what it turned up . . .

    GoogleUpdate Setup JS:Fake Warning- E [Trj]

    There were three installations of that which managed to get in even
    after I did the System Restore. Fortunately, those were stopped by
    AVAST in time. Rotten thing was still trying to get me.

    What's that look like to you?

    GoogleUpdate Setup JS:Fake Warning- E [Trj]

    I'm running Google Chrome -- so, I'm getting this with the Google
    Updates -- or what?
    --

    I visited the link you posted to Ubuntu. But I have to admit, for
    somebody at my basic level of computer savvy it looked pretty hairy,
    all the steps required to get that disk burned. So, maybe I'll just
    get on that long waiting list for purchase of the CD that's all set up
    and ready to run. It looks like a great tool to have on hand. That's
    a whole new technology to me, way out of my range of experience of
    burning a simple CD, knowing enough to punch the F8 key--simple things
    like that. ;-)

    I do thank you for your help, even if I'm too far back around the
    curve to take advantage of it.

    Thanks!
    --
    JM
     
  19. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    On 8/26/2010 7:45 PM, Just Me wrote:
    > On Aug 26, 12:01 pm, Alias<aka@masked&anonymous.com.invalid> wrote:
    >> On 8/26/2010 1:18 AM, Just Me wrote:
    >>
    >>> I visited the link you posted to Ubuntu. But I have to admit, for
    >>> somebody at my basic level of computer savvy it looked pretty hairy,
    >>> all the steps required to get that disk burned. So, maybe I'll just
    >>> get on that long waiting list for purchase of the CD that's all set up
    >>> and ready to run. It looks like a great tool to have on hand. That's
    >>> a whole new technology to me, way out of my range of experience of
    >>> burning a simple CD, knowing enough to punch the F8 key--simple things
    >>> like that.;-)

    >>
    >>> I do thank you for your help, even if I'm too far back around the
    >>> curve to take advantage of it.

    >>
    >>> Thanks!

    >>
    >> Don't bother trying to learn how to do the MD5SUM. I've never had a
    >> download that didn't have a correct one. Just download the .ISO, burn
    >> the image to a DVD using something like Nero and you're set to go. That
    >> said, being as you're coming from Windows, you would be better off
    >> checking out Linux Mint as it is much easier to install than Ubuntu.
    >> It's based on Ubuntu but the DVD download will install Flash, Java,
    >> codecs, fonts, etc as a part of the OS install. Mint can be found atwww.linuxmint.com. You can install Mint as a dual boot with XP and you
    >> will be asked if you want to install it "side by side" when you run the
    >> install of Mint.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Alias
    >>
    >> iamal...@shoesgmail.com
    >> Remove shoes to email me.

    >
    > Thanks, alias. Sounds good. I'll check it out!
    > --
    > JM


    Email me if you have questions or problems with it.

    --
    Alias
     

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