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System Files

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Jessica@aol.com, Apr 30, 2010.

  1. Jessica@aol.com

    Jessica@aol.com Flightless Bird

    Hello,

    I am trying to locate the boot.ini file on the Windows XP Professional CD. I
    am trying to create a bootable cd.

    Please advise.
    --
    Mike
     
  2. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Jessica@aol.com wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am trying to locate the boot.ini file on the Windows XP Professional CD. I
    > am trying to create a bootable cd.
    >
    > Please advise.


    First of all, I'll have to admit, I've never made a bootable CD
    from scratch myself. These are just a few bits and pieces I've noticed
    along the way.

    It is not simply a matter of "throwing" some files onto a CD.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bootable_cd

    Try figure 1 on page 6 here. This is an archived copy of the El-Torito spec.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20070928...-9CC9-4DF5-B496-A286D893E36A/0/specscdrom.pdf

    In terms of learning about the different CD formats, try a utility like
    "disktype". For example, I can boot a Linux LiveCD in a VPC2007 session
    (using the toram option), and then run "disktype" from in there. In the
    following, I include a couple examples of discs I checked, for comparison.
    disktype can analyse a great many different file systems, and printing
    out CD/DVD structures is only one of its capabilities.

    http://disktype.sourceforge.net/

    When Microsoft offered a 2GB+ download of Windows 7 last year, I ran
    the disktype utility on that image, and this is what it said.

    *******
    --- 7100.0.090421-1700_x86fre_client_en-us_retail_ultimate-grc1culfrer_en_dvd.iso
    Regular file, size 2.357 GiB (2530975744 bytes)
    UDF file system
    Sector size 2048 bytes
    Volume name "<5500><4400><4600><2000><5600><6F00><6C00><7500><6D00><6500>"
    UDF version 1.02
    ISO9660 file system
    Volume name "GRC1CULFRER_EN_DVD"
    Publisher "MICROSOFT CORPORATION"
    Preparer "MICROSOFT CORPORATION, ONE MICROSOFT WAY, REDMOND WA 98052, (425) 882-8080"
    Application "CDIMAGE 2.54 (01/01/2005 TM)"
    Data size 2.357 GiB (2530975744 bytes, 1235828 blocks of 2 Ki8)
    El Torito boot record, catalog at 22
    Bootable non-emulated image, starts at 663, preloads 4 KiB
    Platform 0x00 (x86), System Type 0x00 (Empty)
    *******

    You can see that DVD uses El Torito. And the bootstrap portion does not
    use an emulation of a floppy, to do its work. Now, for comparison, this
    is the "disktype" output for a dual layer DVD movie I burned. There is
    no boot stuff to be seen, in this report. This is effectively a "data" disc.

    *******
    --- /dev/sr1
    Block device, size 7.076 GiB (7597457408 bytes)
    CD-ROM, 1 track, CDDB disk ID 02000001
    Track 1: Data track, 0 bytes
    UDF file system
    Sector size 2048 bytes
    Volume name "VACATION_2009"
    UDF version 1.02
    ISO9660 file system
    Volume name "VACATION_2009"
    Application "IMGBURN V2.5.0.0 - THE ULTIMATE IMAGE BURNER!"
    Data size 7.076 GiB (7597410304 bytes, 3709673 blocks of 2 Ki8)
    *******

    So whatever utility you use, to prepare a bootable CD, it involves more than
    just the "visible" files on the CD. There is also stuff that needs to be
    included for booting, and there are techniques for including it into an
    ISO9660 image.

    So if you take a Windows installer CD, and copy the files (drag and drop)
    to another burnable CD, that won't grab any of the boot structure. You need
    a tool. For example, in this description of "isomaster", I see mention of
    features needed for boot support.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isomaster

    In the page here, a program called "isobuster" is mentioned. This guy
    is building his own bootable CD, and this page describes some
    of the details.

    http://www.infocellar.com/cd/boot-cd.htm

    A utility that copies CDs, will know about the boot stuff and copy
    it as well. Copying using just the "visible", file system section
    of the CD, won't work by itself.

    One other example, for fun. If you download the memtest86+ test
    CD, it is an example of bootable media. This one seems to be using
    floppy emulation, as near as I can tell. The download size is only
    62KB (compressed), so you know there is little in the way of code
    inside this thing. Inside this, there is an ".img" the size of a
    floppy, but even that is mostly empty. If a bootable CD burning program
    like Nero, burns this to disc, it is going to be burning at least
    several megabytes worth of sectors, to finish the job.

    http://www.memtest.org/download/4.00/memtest86+-4.00.iso.zip

    If I open that with 7-ZIP, the structure inside looks like

    BOOT
    BOOT.CAT 2048 bytes
    MEMTEST.IMG 1474560 bytes
    [BOOT]
    Bootable_1.44M.img 1474560 bytes
    README.TXT

    The README.TXT file is included, so if the CD is popped into a
    running Windows computer, you'll have something to read. It would
    be the only "visible" file on the CD. It was placed there, to make
    people "comfortable", as a completely empty test CD would scare people.
    All of the working bits, of that bootable CD, are hidden. The 1474560 byte
    floppy emulation (1440K) is actually mostly empty. A single executable
    program hides in there, and it runs the 640x480 VESA screen while
    the memory testing is taking place.

    So that is an example, of as bare-bones a bootable CD as you can find.
    The CD does have a file system, but it was only put there for comfort
    and not for function.

    Now, how that differs from a Windows installer CD, is in the memtest
    case, the bootstrap loader ends up running the computer. On the
    Windows CD, the bootstrap loader is only an intermediate step, and
    it eventually begins to access the "visible" files on the disk, as a
    real OS of some sort is being booted.

    My purpose in explaining this, is mainly to point out that a "drag
    and drop" copy is not enough. There are some more details.

    Paul
     
  3. dadiOH

    dadiOH Flightless Bird

    Jessica@aol.com wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am trying to locate the boot.ini file on the Windows XP
    > Professional CD. I am trying to create a bootable cd.
    >
    > Please advise.


    Boot.ini is just a text file that specifies where Windows resides on *your*
    system; consequently, you won't find it on your XP CD...look on C:

    You shouldn't need it on a boot CD anyway.

    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
  4. dadiOH

    dadiOH Flightless Bird

    dadiOH wrote:
    > Jessica@aol.com wrote:
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> I am trying to locate the boot.ini file on the Windows XP
    >> Professional CD. I am trying to create a bootable cd.
    >>
    >> Please advise.

    >
    > Boot.ini is just a text file that specifies where Windows resides on
    > *your* system; consequently, you won't find it on your XP CD...look
    > on C:
    > You shouldn't need it on a boot CD anyway.


    What you *do* need are files from a boot *floppy*; however, as Paul pointed
    out, just dumping them onto a CD won't make the CD bootable unless you've
    made an .iso of the floppy.

    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
  5. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Jessica@aol.com wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am trying to locate the boot.ini file on the Windows XP
    > Professional CD. I am trying to create a bootable cd.


    Why are you doing this?

    What do you intend to do with it?

    Is there a specific type of bootable CD you are trying to create? Bart
    PE perhaps?

    Please provide more information.
     
  6. LD5SZRA

    LD5SZRA Flightless Bird

    You don't need to create a bootable CD because your Windows XP
    Professional CD is itself a bootable CD. If you want a CD to
    create backup copies of your documents because your system has
    become unresponsive or unbootable then I suggest you download
    either a Windows Vista Recovery CD or Windows 7 Recovery CD
    because these CDs will be able to read the NTFS file System of
    Windows XP and allow you to create backups. Try this link:

    <http://neosmart.net/blog/2008/windows-vista-recovery-disc-download/>

    Windows 7 Recovery CD Link is at the bottom of the screen.

    hth


    Jessica@aol.com wrote:
    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am trying to locate the boot.ini file on the Windows XP Professional CD. I
    > am trying to create a bootable cd.
    >
    > Please advise.
    > --
    > Mike


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    Copyright LD5SZRA 2010.
     
  7. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:-O4NFNoZ6KHA.3656@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl,
    Daave <daave@example.com> typed:
    > Jessica@aol.com wrote:
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> I am trying to locate the boot.ini file on the Windows XP
    >> Professional CD. I am trying to create a bootable cd.

    >
    > Why are you doing this?
    >
    > What do you intend to do with it?
    >
    > Is there a specific type of bootable CD you are trying to
    > create? Bart PE perhaps?
    >
    > Please provide more information.


    OP: As you've already been told by another poster, it's not on the CD; it's
    created on the hard drive and can be different for different computer
    configurations. Pull the one from your boot drive to see it as it needs to
    be.

    It would have been smart to mention what it is that you're trying to do. Oh,
    and ignore LD55ZRA; it seldom gives anything useful.

    HTH,

    Twayne`
     

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