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Remote Desktop to a locally logged in PC. What happens?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Rog, Jul 8, 2010.

  1. Rog

    Rog Flightless Bird

    I was always under the impression that if an administrator attempted to
    remote desktop into a Windows XP machine that already had someone logged in
    locally, the remote desktop session would force a logoff of the local user,
    allowing the remote desktop session to take control. I'm noticing that
    occasionally, the remote desktop session seems to piggyback on the local
    session, giving you the already open desktop with running programs.

    What determines whether there's a forced logoff, or you get the already open
    desktop?
     
  2. Bernd

    Bernd Flightless Bird

    -------- Original-Nachricht --------

    > I was always under the impression that if an administrator attempted to
    > remote desktop into a Windows XP machine that already had someone logged in
    > locally, the remote desktop session would force a logoff of the local user,
    > allowing the remote desktop session to take control. I'm noticing that
    > occasionally, the remote desktop session seems to piggyback on the local
    > session, giving you the already open desktop with running programs.
    >
    > What determines whether there's a forced logoff, or you get the already open
    > desktop?
    >
    >


    Look here:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/280828/

    Bernd
     
  3. Dave R.

    Dave R. Flightless Bird

    "Rog" <Rog@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:2A6A49E4-0D53-4701-AA1C-6A86E1E934A8@microsoft.com...
    >I was always under the impression that if an administrator attempted
    >to
    > remote desktop into a Windows XP machine that already had someone
    > logged in
    > locally, the remote desktop session would force a logoff of the
    > local user,
    > allowing the remote desktop session to take control. I'm noticing
    > that
    > occasionally, the remote desktop session seems to piggyback on the
    > local
    > session, giving you the already open desktop with running programs.
    >
    > What determines whether there's a forced logoff, or you get the
    > already open
    > desktop?
    >
    >


    In my experience, if you log in as the same user that is already
    logged on locally, you take over the existing session. If you log in
    as a different user, you either force a logoff or the user gets
    asked - per the link in Bernd's post.

    --
    Zaphod

    Arthur: All my life I've had this strange feeling that there's
    something big and sinister going on in the world.
    Slartibartfast: No, that's perfectly normal paranoia. Everyone in the
    universe gets that.
     
  4. Rog

    Rog Flightless Bird

    This is the piece of info for which I was looking. Thanks.



    "Dave R." wrote:

    >
    > "Rog" <Rog@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:2A6A49E4-0D53-4701-AA1C-6A86E1E934A8@microsoft.com...
    > >I was always under the impression that if an administrator attempted
    > >to
    > > remote desktop into a Windows XP machine that already had someone
    > > logged in
    > > locally, the remote desktop session would force a logoff of the
    > > local user,
    > > allowing the remote desktop session to take control. I'm noticing
    > > that
    > > occasionally, the remote desktop session seems to piggyback on the
    > > local
    > > session, giving you the already open desktop with running programs.
    > >
    > > What determines whether there's a forced logoff, or you get the
    > > already open
    > > desktop?
    > >
    > >

    >
    > In my experience, if you log in as the same user that is already
    > logged on locally, you take over the existing session. If you log in
    > as a different user, you either force a logoff or the user gets
    > asked - per the link in Bernd's post.
    >
    > --
    > Zaphod
    >
    > Arthur: All my life I've had this strange feeling that there's
    > something big and sinister going on in the world.
    > Slartibartfast: No, that's perfectly normal paranoia. Everyone in the
    > universe gets that.
    >
    >
    > .
    >
     

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