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Mouse vs. Keyboard Shortcut Keys

Discussion in 'Microsoft Office' started by Rosemary, Mar 19, 2010.

  1. Rosemary

    Rosemary Flightless Bird

    Hi,

    We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading to
    Office 2007 the end of this year.

    There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the mouse
    because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who use
    the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who prefer
    keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)

    The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts are
    faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard shortcuts that
    much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a valid
    argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I haven't
    seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the mouse
    and those who use keyboard shortcuts.

    Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would like to
    continue to use the mouse?

    Many thanks,
    Rosemary
     
  2. LD55ZRA

    LD55ZRA Flightless Bird

    Rose,

    Don't waste your time trying to convince nutters. Your time is better spent
    doing some productive work. Haven't you noticed on these newsgroups nobody
    agrees with each other. MVPs have all ganged up together and they lick each
    others p u s s i e s while the rest of us try correcting their errors never
    mind pointing out their stupidities.

    hth

    "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:3A7F341B-578A-4122-857E-9A4628F91B87@microsoft.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading to
    > Office 2007 the end of this year.
    >
    > There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    > between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    > shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the
    > mouse
    > because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who
    > use
    > the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who
    > prefer
    > keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)
    >
    > The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts are
    > faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard shortcuts
    > that
    > much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a valid
    > argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I
    > haven't
    > seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the
    > mouse
    > and those who use keyboard shortcuts.
    >
    > Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would like
    > to
    > continue to use the mouse?
    >
    > Many thanks,
    > Rosemary
    >
    >
    >
     
  3. Nathan Sokalski

    Nathan Sokalski Flightless Bird

    Which one is "faster" actually depends more on the user, as well as what
    task you are working on at the time (are you editing text or a graphic, are
    you selecting an object or an area, etc.). You can't argue with the fact
    that you don't need to take your hands off the keyboard for keyboard
    shortcuts can make it faster. However, if you are not familiar with the key
    combinations or have trouble remembering them, looking at a reference sheet
    to use keyboard shortcuts may be more effort than it's worth. Probably the
    best argument for using the mouse is that you don't need to remember the key
    combinations and it is easier to keep track of where the cursor is while
    working. But my suggestion is to just use both, because some tasks are
    easier with keyboard shortcuts (such as copy & pasting), while others are
    easier with the mouse (scrolling, selection, resizing, etc.). There is no
    reason to tell someone they shouldn't or can't use both, because the fastest
    one is whichever one you are most comfortable with.

    Here are some nice references with all the keyboard shortcuts for Windows
    and Internet Explorer:

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Keyboard-shortcuts
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Internet-Explorer-keyboard-shortcuts
    --
    Nathan Sokalski
    njsokalski@hotmail.com
    http://www.nathansokalski.com/

    "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:3A7F341B-578A-4122-857E-9A4628F91B87@microsoft.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading to
    > Office 2007 the end of this year.
    >
    > There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    > between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    > shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the
    > mouse
    > because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who
    > use
    > the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who
    > prefer
    > keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)
    >
    > The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts are
    > faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard shortcuts
    > that
    > much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a valid
    > argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I
    > haven't
    > seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the
    > mouse
    > and those who use keyboard shortcuts.
    >
    > Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would like
    > to
    > continue to use the mouse?
    >
    > Many thanks,
    > Rosemary
    >
    >
    >
     
  4. Rosemary

    Rosemary Flightless Bird

    Thank you, Nathan, that is very helpful. Regards,

    "Nathan Sokalski" wrote:

    > Which one is "faster" actually depends more on the user, as well as what
    > task you are working on at the time (are you editing text or a graphic, are
    > you selecting an object or an area, etc.). You can't argue with the fact
    > that you don't need to take your hands off the keyboard for keyboard
    > shortcuts can make it faster. However, if you are not familiar with the key
    > combinations or have trouble remembering them, looking at a reference sheet
    > to use keyboard shortcuts may be more effort than it's worth. Probably the
    > best argument for using the mouse is that you don't need to remember the key
    > combinations and it is easier to keep track of where the cursor is while
    > working. But my suggestion is to just use both, because some tasks are
    > easier with keyboard shortcuts (such as copy & pasting), while others are
    > easier with the mouse (scrolling, selection, resizing, etc.). There is no
    > reason to tell someone they shouldn't or can't use both, because the fastest
    > one is whichever one you are most comfortable with.
    >
    > Here are some nice references with all the keyboard shortcuts for Windows
    > and Internet Explorer:
    >
    > http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Keyboard-shortcuts
    > http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Internet-Explorer-keyboard-shortcuts
    > --
    > Nathan Sokalski
    > njsokalski@hotmail.com
    > http://www.nathansokalski.com/
    >
    > "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:3A7F341B-578A-4122-857E-9A4628F91B87@microsoft.com...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading to
    > > Office 2007 the end of this year.
    > >
    > > There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    > > between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    > > shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the
    > > mouse
    > > because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who
    > > use
    > > the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who
    > > prefer
    > > keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)
    > >
    > > The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts are
    > > faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard shortcuts
    > > that
    > > much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a valid
    > > argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I
    > > haven't
    > > seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the
    > > mouse
    > > and those who use keyboard shortcuts.
    > >
    > > Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would like
    > > to
    > > continue to use the mouse?
    > >
    > > Many thanks,
    > > Rosemary
    > >
    > >
    > >
     
  5. Susan Ramlet

    Susan Ramlet Flightless Bird

    Nathan's right: it depends on the user and the task.

    For text entry, for most people, 10-finger keying is faster than mousing.

    For navigating a web page, for most people, the mouse is a more efficient
    way to go to and select a clickable element.

    Regarding shortcuts (Ctl-X instead of Cut), they are usually faster if you
    can remember them. My informal research shows that people tend to use a
    combination--even in coordination. For example, I have often seen people
    select text with the mouse in one hand, then use shortcuts with the left
    hand.

    There is a lot of research going on about input methods now, but they tend
    to revolve around mobile devices, touch screens and voice. I'm sure if you
    wanted to find some research, you could hunt around ACM (acm.org).

    I mostly hope that you can find a way to make it easy for all of your staff
    to work efficiently and not force anyone to a particular model.

    --
    Susan Ramlet
    **please reply to the newsgroup so others may benefit**


    "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:A2E6C039-8E8A-4275-A0D6-4CD8FB9662EA@microsoft.com...
    > Thank you, Nathan, that is very helpful. Regards,
    >
    > "Nathan Sokalski" wrote:
    >
    >> Which one is "faster" actually depends more on the user, as well as what
    >> task you are working on at the time (are you editing text or a graphic,
    >> are
    >> you selecting an object or an area, etc.). You can't argue with the fact
    >> that you don't need to take your hands off the keyboard for keyboard
    >> shortcuts can make it faster. However, if you are not familiar with the
    >> key
    >> combinations or have trouble remembering them, looking at a reference
    >> sheet
    >> to use keyboard shortcuts may be more effort than it's worth. Probably
    >> the
    >> best argument for using the mouse is that you don't need to remember the
    >> key
    >> combinations and it is easier to keep track of where the cursor is while
    >> working. But my suggestion is to just use both, because some tasks are
    >> easier with keyboard shortcuts (such as copy & pasting), while others are
    >> easier with the mouse (scrolling, selection, resizing, etc.). There is no
    >> reason to tell someone they shouldn't or can't use both, because the
    >> fastest
    >> one is whichever one you are most comfortable with.
    >>
    >> Here are some nice references with all the keyboard shortcuts for Windows
    >> and Internet Explorer:
    >>
    >> http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Keyboard-shortcuts
    >> http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Internet-Explorer-keyboard-shortcuts
    >> --
    >> Nathan Sokalski
    >> njsokalski@hotmail.com
    >> http://www.nathansokalski.com/
    >>
    >> "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:3A7F341B-578A-4122-857E-9A4628F91B87@microsoft.com...
    >> > Hi,
    >> >
    >> > We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading
    >> > to
    >> > Office 2007 the end of this year.
    >> >
    >> > There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    >> > between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    >> > shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the
    >> > mouse
    >> > because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who
    >> > use
    >> > the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who
    >> > prefer
    >> > keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)
    >> >
    >> > The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts
    >> > are
    >> > faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard
    >> > shortcuts
    >> > that
    >> > much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a
    >> > valid
    >> > argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I
    >> > haven't
    >> > seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the
    >> > mouse
    >> > and those who use keyboard shortcuts.
    >> >
    >> > Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would
    >> > like
    >> > to
    >> > continue to use the mouse?
    >> >
    >> > Many thanks,
    >> > Rosemary
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
     
  6. Rosemary

    Rosemary Flightless Bird

    Thank you, Susan, that helps a lot. My aim is indeed to not force anyone to
    a particular model. Thanks again,


    "Susan Ramlet" wrote:

    > Nathan's right: it depends on the user and the task.
    >
    > For text entry, for most people, 10-finger keying is faster than mousing.
    >
    > For navigating a web page, for most people, the mouse is a more efficient
    > way to go to and select a clickable element.
    >
    > Regarding shortcuts (Ctl-X instead of Cut), they are usually faster if you
    > can remember them. My informal research shows that people tend to use a
    > combination--even in coordination. For example, I have often seen people
    > select text with the mouse in one hand, then use shortcuts with the left
    > hand.
    >
    > There is a lot of research going on about input methods now, but they tend
    > to revolve around mobile devices, touch screens and voice. I'm sure if you
    > wanted to find some research, you could hunt around ACM (acm.org).
    >
    > I mostly hope that you can find a way to make it easy for all of your staff
    > to work efficiently and not force anyone to a particular model.
    >
    > --
    > Susan Ramlet
    > **please reply to the newsgroup so others may benefit**
    >
    >
    > "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:A2E6C039-8E8A-4275-A0D6-4CD8FB9662EA@microsoft.com...
    > > Thank you, Nathan, that is very helpful. Regards,
    > >
    > > "Nathan Sokalski" wrote:
    > >
    > >> Which one is "faster" actually depends more on the user, as well as what
    > >> task you are working on at the time (are you editing text or a graphic,
    > >> are
    > >> you selecting an object or an area, etc.). You can't argue with the fact
    > >> that you don't need to take your hands off the keyboard for keyboard
    > >> shortcuts can make it faster. However, if you are not familiar with the
    > >> key
    > >> combinations or have trouble remembering them, looking at a reference
    > >> sheet
    > >> to use keyboard shortcuts may be more effort than it's worth. Probably
    > >> the
    > >> best argument for using the mouse is that you don't need to remember the
    > >> key
    > >> combinations and it is easier to keep track of where the cursor is while
    > >> working. But my suggestion is to just use both, because some tasks are
    > >> easier with keyboard shortcuts (such as copy & pasting), while others are
    > >> easier with the mouse (scrolling, selection, resizing, etc.). There is no
    > >> reason to tell someone they shouldn't or can't use both, because the
    > >> fastest
    > >> one is whichever one you are most comfortable with.
    > >>
    > >> Here are some nice references with all the keyboard shortcuts for Windows
    > >> and Internet Explorer:
    > >>
    > >> http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Keyboard-shortcuts
    > >> http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Internet-Explorer-keyboard-shortcuts
    > >> --
    > >> Nathan Sokalski
    > >> njsokalski@hotmail.com
    > >> http://www.nathansokalski.com/
    > >>
    > >> "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:3A7F341B-578A-4122-857E-9A4628F91B87@microsoft.com...
    > >> > Hi,
    > >> >
    > >> > We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading
    > >> > to
    > >> > Office 2007 the end of this year.
    > >> >
    > >> > There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    > >> > between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    > >> > shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the
    > >> > mouse
    > >> > because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who
    > >> > use
    > >> > the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who
    > >> > prefer
    > >> > keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)
    > >> >
    > >> > The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts
    > >> > are
    > >> > faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard
    > >> > shortcuts
    > >> > that
    > >> > much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a
    > >> > valid
    > >> > argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I
    > >> > haven't
    > >> > seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the
    > >> > mouse
    > >> > and those who use keyboard shortcuts.
    > >> >
    > >> > Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would
    > >> > like
    > >> > to
    > >> > continue to use the mouse?
    > >> >
    > >> > Many thanks,
    > >> > Rosemary
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >

    >
     
  7. Steve Rindsberg

    Steve Rindsberg Flightless Bird

    In support of that, you could make the case that the users will be most productive with
    the methods that they're most comfortable with, assuming you measure productivity on a
    larger scale rather than at the level of "How long does it take to copy/paste this bit
    of text from here to there". And it sounds as though you're on the right track.

    In article <8C8388EB-707D-4C91-9B2D-048A67F31504@microsoft.com>, Rosemary wrote:
    > Thank you, Susan, that helps a lot. My aim is indeed to not force anyone to
    > a particular model. Thanks again,
    >
    > "Susan Ramlet" wrote:
    >
    > > Nathan's right: it depends on the user and the task.
    > >
    > > For text entry, for most people, 10-finger keying is faster than mousing.
    > >
    > > For navigating a web page, for most people, the mouse is a more efficient
    > > way to go to and select a clickable element.
    > >
    > > Regarding shortcuts (Ctl-X instead of Cut), they are usually faster if you
    > > can remember them. My informal research shows that people tend to use a
    > > combination--even in coordination. For example, I have often seen people
    > > select text with the mouse in one hand, then use shortcuts with the left
    > > hand.
    > >
    > > There is a lot of research going on about input methods now, but they tend
    > > to revolve around mobile devices, touch screens and voice. I'm sure if you
    > > wanted to find some research, you could hunt around ACM (acm.org).
    > >
    > > I mostly hope that you can find a way to make it easy for all of your staff
    > > to work efficiently and not force anyone to a particular model.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Susan Ramlet
    > > **please reply to the newsgroup so others may benefit**
    > >
    > >
    > > "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > news:A2E6C039-8E8A-4275-A0D6-4CD8FB9662EA@microsoft.com...
    > > > Thank you, Nathan, that is very helpful. Regards,
    > > >
    > > > "Nathan Sokalski" wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> Which one is "faster" actually depends more on the user, as well as what
    > > >> task you are working on at the time (are you editing text or a graphic,
    > > >> are
    > > >> you selecting an object or an area, etc.). You can't argue with the fact
    > > >> that you don't need to take your hands off the keyboard for keyboard
    > > >> shortcuts can make it faster. However, if you are not familiar with the
    > > >> key
    > > >> combinations or have trouble remembering them, looking at a reference
    > > >> sheet
    > > >> to use keyboard shortcuts may be more effort than it's worth. Probably
    > > >> the
    > > >> best argument for using the mouse is that you don't need to remember the
    > > >> key
    > > >> combinations and it is easier to keep track of where the cursor is while
    > > >> working. But my suggestion is to just use both, because some tasks are
    > > >> easier with keyboard shortcuts (such as copy & pasting), while others are
    > > >> easier with the mouse (scrolling, selection, resizing, etc.). There is no
    > > >> reason to tell someone they shouldn't or can't use both, because the
    > > >> fastest
    > > >> one is whichever one you are most comfortable with.
    > > >>
    > > >> Here are some nice references with all the keyboard shortcuts for Windows
    > > >> and Internet Explorer:
    > > >>
    > > >> http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Keyboard-shortcuts
    > > >> http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Internet-Explorer-keyboard-shortcuts
    > > >> --
    > > >> Nathan Sokalski
    > > >> njsokalski@hotmail.com
    > > >> http://www.nathansokalski.com/
    > > >>
    > > >> "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > >> news:3A7F341B-578A-4122-857E-9A4628F91B87@microsoft.com...
    > > >> > Hi,
    > > >> >
    > > >> > We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading
    > > >> > to
    > > >> > Office 2007 the end of this year.
    > > >> >
    > > >> > There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    > > >> > between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    > > >> > shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the
    > > >> > mouse
    > > >> > because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who
    > > >> > use
    > > >> > the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who
    > > >> > prefer
    > > >> > keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)
    > > >> >
    > > >> > The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts
    > > >> > are
    > > >> > faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard
    > > >> > shortcuts
    > > >> > that
    > > >> > much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a
    > > >> > valid
    > > >> > argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I
    > > >> > haven't
    > > >> > seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the
    > > >> > mouse
    > > >> > and those who use keyboard shortcuts.
    > > >> >
    > > >> > Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would
    > > >> > like
    > > >> > to
    > > >> > continue to use the mouse?
    > > >> >
    > > >> > Many thanks,
    > > >> > Rosemary
    > > >> >
    > > >> >
    > > >> >

    > >
     
  8. db

    db Flightless Bird

    users that are more
    proficient will always
    find a more efficient
    method.

    perhaps, those that
    rely on the mouse simply
    need more time to
    understand that short
    cut keys can make
    life with windows a
    bit easier.

    maybe as a training
    lesson,

    you should take their
    mouse's away for a
    short time

    since virtually everything in
    windows and microsoft
    products can be accessed
    via the keyboard.
    --

    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    - Systems Analyst
    - Database Developer
    - Accountancy
    - Veteran of the Armed Forces
    - Microsoft Partner
    - @hotmail.com
    ~~~~~~~~~~"share the nirvana" - dbZen

    >
    >


    "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:3A7F341B-578A-4122-857E-9A4628F91B87@microsoft.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading to
    > Office 2007 the end of this year.
    >
    > There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    > between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    > shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the mouse
    > because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who use
    > the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who prefer
    > keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)
    >
    > The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts are
    > faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard shortcuts that
    > much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a valid
    > argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I haven't
    > seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the mouse
    > and those who use keyboard shortcuts.
    >
    > Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would like to
    > continue to use the mouse?
    >
    > Many thanks,
    > Rosemary
    >
    >
    >
     
  9. Rosemary

    Rosemary Flightless Bird

    Great, thanks very much Steve,


    "Steve Rindsberg" wrote:

    > In support of that, you could make the case that the users will be most productive with
    > the methods that they're most comfortable with, assuming you measure productivity on a
    > larger scale rather than at the level of "How long does it take to copy/paste this bit
    > of text from here to there". And it sounds as though you're on the right track.
    >
    > In article <8C8388EB-707D-4C91-9B2D-048A67F31504@microsoft.com>, Rosemary wrote:
    > > Thank you, Susan, that helps a lot. My aim is indeed to not force anyone to
    > > a particular model. Thanks again,
    > >
    > > "Susan Ramlet" wrote:
    > >
    > > > Nathan's right: it depends on the user and the task.
    > > >
    > > > For text entry, for most people, 10-finger keying is faster than mousing.
    > > >
    > > > For navigating a web page, for most people, the mouse is a more efficient
    > > > way to go to and select a clickable element.
    > > >
    > > > Regarding shortcuts (Ctl-X instead of Cut), they are usually faster if you
    > > > can remember them. My informal research shows that people tend to use a
    > > > combination--even in coordination. For example, I have often seen people
    > > > select text with the mouse in one hand, then use shortcuts with the left
    > > > hand.
    > > >
    > > > There is a lot of research going on about input methods now, but they tend
    > > > to revolve around mobile devices, touch screens and voice. I'm sure if you
    > > > wanted to find some research, you could hunt around ACM (acm.org).
    > > >
    > > > I mostly hope that you can find a way to make it easy for all of your staff
    > > > to work efficiently and not force anyone to a particular model.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Susan Ramlet
    > > > **please reply to the newsgroup so others may benefit**
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:A2E6C039-8E8A-4275-A0D6-4CD8FB9662EA@microsoft.com...
    > > > > Thank you, Nathan, that is very helpful. Regards,
    > > > >
    > > > > "Nathan Sokalski" wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > >> Which one is "faster" actually depends more on the user, as well as what
    > > > >> task you are working on at the time (are you editing text or a graphic,
    > > > >> are
    > > > >> you selecting an object or an area, etc.). You can't argue with the fact
    > > > >> that you don't need to take your hands off the keyboard for keyboard
    > > > >> shortcuts can make it faster. However, if you are not familiar with the
    > > > >> key
    > > > >> combinations or have trouble remembering them, looking at a reference
    > > > >> sheet
    > > > >> to use keyboard shortcuts may be more effort than it's worth. Probably
    > > > >> the
    > > > >> best argument for using the mouse is that you don't need to remember the
    > > > >> key
    > > > >> combinations and it is easier to keep track of where the cursor is while
    > > > >> working. But my suggestion is to just use both, because some tasks are
    > > > >> easier with keyboard shortcuts (such as copy & pasting), while others are
    > > > >> easier with the mouse (scrolling, selection, resizing, etc.). There is no
    > > > >> reason to tell someone they shouldn't or can't use both, because the
    > > > >> fastest
    > > > >> one is whichever one you are most comfortable with.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> Here are some nice references with all the keyboard shortcuts for Windows
    > > > >> and Internet Explorer:
    > > > >>
    > > > >> http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Keyboard-shortcuts
    > > > >> http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Internet-Explorer-keyboard-shortcuts
    > > > >> --
    > > > >> Nathan Sokalski
    > > > >> njsokalski@hotmail.com
    > > > >> http://www.nathansokalski.com/
    > > > >>
    > > > >> "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > > >> news:3A7F341B-578A-4122-857E-9A4628F91B87@microsoft.com...
    > > > >> > Hi,
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading
    > > > >> > to
    > > > >> > Office 2007 the end of this year.
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    > > > >> > between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    > > > >> > shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the
    > > > >> > mouse
    > > > >> > because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who
    > > > >> > use
    > > > >> > the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who
    > > > >> > prefer
    > > > >> > keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts
    > > > >> > are
    > > > >> > faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard
    > > > >> > shortcuts
    > > > >> > that
    > > > >> > much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a
    > > > >> > valid
    > > > >> > argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I
    > > > >> > haven't
    > > > >> > seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the
    > > > >> > mouse
    > > > >> > and those who use keyboard shortcuts.
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would
    > > > >> > like
    > > > >> > to
    > > > >> > continue to use the mouse?
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> > Many thanks,
    > > > >> > Rosemary
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> >
    > > > >> >
    > > >

    >
    >
    >
    > .
    >
     
  10. Rosemary

    Rosemary Flightless Bird

    Thanks, your feedback is helpful. One of our IT people told us to take one
    shortcut key each week and just practice that one for the entire week. They
    said that's the best way to make shortcut keys a habit ...

    "db" wrote:

    > users that are more
    > proficient will always
    > find a more efficient
    > method.
    >
    > perhaps, those that
    > rely on the mouse simply
    > need more time to
    > understand that short
    > cut keys can make
    > life with windows a
    > bit easier.
    >
    > maybe as a training
    > lesson,
    >
    > you should take their
    > mouse's away for a
    > short time
    >
    > since virtually everything in
    > windows and microsoft
    > products can be accessed
    > via the keyboard.
    > --
    >
    > db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    > DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    > - Systems Analyst
    > - Database Developer
    > - Accountancy
    > - Veteran of the Armed Forces
    > - Microsoft Partner
    > - @hotmail.com
    > ~~~~~~~~~~"share the nirvana" - dbZen
    >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:3A7F341B-578A-4122-857E-9A4628F91B87@microsoft.com...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading to
    > > Office 2007 the end of this year.
    > >
    > > There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    > > between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    > > shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the mouse
    > > because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who use
    > > the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who prefer
    > > keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)
    > >
    > > The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts are
    > > faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard shortcuts that
    > > much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a valid
    > > argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I haven't
    > > seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the mouse
    > > and those who use keyboard shortcuts.
    > >
    > > Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would like to
    > > continue to use the mouse?
    > >
    > > Many thanks,
    > > Rosemary
    > >
    > >
    > >
     
  11. db

    db Flightless Bird

    you're welcome.

    I think your tech has
    a good idea.

    you can also printout
    keyboard shortcuts to
    keep handy by the kb

    I think I have seen
    laminated versions at
    office depot.

    --

    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    - Systems Analyst
    - Database Developer
    - Accountancy
    - Veteran of the Armed Forces
    - Microsoft Partner
    - @hotmail.com
    ~~~~~~~~~~"share the nirvana" - dbZen

    >
    >


    "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:9C6807C6-6DA3-4875-B364-2AFC65D7C1E3@microsoft.com...
    > Thanks, your feedback is helpful. One of our IT people told us to take one
    > shortcut key each week and just practice that one for the entire week. They
    > said that's the best way to make shortcut keys a habit ...
    >
    > "db" wrote:
    >
    >> users that are more
    >> proficient will always
    >> find a more efficient
    >> method.
    >>
    >> perhaps, those that
    >> rely on the mouse simply
    >> need more time to
    >> understand that short
    >> cut keys can make
    >> life with windows a
    >> bit easier.
    >>
    >> maybe as a training
    >> lesson,
    >>
    >> you should take their
    >> mouse's away for a
    >> short time
    >>
    >> since virtually everything in
    >> windows and microsoft
    >> products can be accessed
    >> via the keyboard.
    >> --
    >>
    >> db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    >> DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    >> - Systems Analyst
    >> - Database Developer
    >> - Accountancy
    >> - Veteran of the Armed Forces
    >> - Microsoft Partner
    >> - @hotmail.com
    >> ~~~~~~~~~~"share the nirvana" - dbZen
    >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >> "Rosemary" <Rosemary@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:3A7F341B-578A-4122-857E-9A4628F91B87@microsoft.com...
    >> > Hi,
    >> >
    >> > We have Windows XP and use Microsoft Office 2003. We will be upgrading to
    >> > Office 2007 the end of this year.
    >> >
    >> > There is an ongoing debate in my department (word processing operators)
    >> > between those who like to use the mouse, and those who prefer keyboard
    >> > shorcuts. Those who prefer keyboard shortcuts say it's faster than the mouse
    >> > because you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard. (Those who use
    >> > the mouse do also use some keyboard shortcuts; by contrast those who prefer
    >> > keyboard shortcuts tend to not use the mouse at all.)
    >> >
    >> > The research I have done does indeed indicate that keyboard shortcuts are
    >> > faster than the mouse. But here is my question: are keyboard shortcuts that
    >> > much faster? The reason I ask is because I would like to provide a valid
    >> > argument for those who like the mouse to continue using the mouse. I haven't
    >> > seen a significant difference in productivity between those who use the mouse
    >> > and those who use keyboard shortcuts.
    >> >
    >> > Can anyone provide me with good arguments to back up those who would like to
    >> > continue to use the mouse?
    >> >
    >> > Many thanks,
    >> > Rosemary
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
     

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