1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Memory Upgrade Woes

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Paul Richards, Aug 1, 2010.

  1. Paul Richards

    Paul Richards Flightless Bird

    Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    start here.

    I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years now.
    No problems whatsoever.

    I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!

    With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?

    I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)

    --
    Paul
    Melbourne, Australia
     
  2. ED

    ED Flightless Bird

    "Paul Richards" <paulrichards@XXXNOSPAMiinet.net.au> wrote in message
    news:%23WDZgbdMLHA.1172@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    > start here.
    >
    > I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years now.
    > No problems whatsoever.
    >
    > I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    > correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >
    > With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    > encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    > the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    > all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >
    > I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)
    >
    > --
    > Paul
    > Melbourne, Australia


    Sounds like a power supply that's incapable of the extra current needed.
    What is the rating of the power supply?
    Try using just one of the new chips at a time. Does either work by itself?
     
  3. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Paul Richards wrote:
    > Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    > start here.
    >
    > I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years now.
    > No problems whatsoever.
    >
    > I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    > correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >
    > With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    > encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    > the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    > all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >
    > I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)
    >


    I'd test the new 1GB sticks individually, to see if the problem is
    more prevalent with one stick or the other.

    If one stick is stable and error free, that tells you the product
    is likely going to work for you (in the long run). It may then just
    require returning the bad stick, so you have two good sticks.

    In some cases, if you bought a matched pair in a single bubble pack,
    you'll be required to return both of them. In the cases of some
    "quality" products, the same thing happens with the next package
    (one good stick, one bad stick). Maybe third time lucky...

    DDR2 memory uses ODT or On Die Termination. That is an improvement
    over how the bus worked with DDR memory, and tends to work a bit
    better, whether one or two sticks are present on a bus segment.
    But that being said, if the memory is not properly tested at the
    factory, then it doesn't really matter how nice the design intent -
    cutting corners on testing, is how you make money in that business.

    Another test you can try (besides a memory tester), is Prime95 Stress Test.
    On a dual core processor, it would open two threads of execution. The
    program does a math calculation with a known answer, so the program can
    tell when there has been a memory or CPU error. On an unstable system,
    the program will fail in two to ten seconds. On a "close to stable"
    system, you want to run for at least four hours, without the program
    reporting errors, before you're done testing. This is going to make
    the fan run on the computer, as the CPU should run flat out while
    testing. ( When the program asks to "Join GIMPS?", answer you're
    "just testing". )

    http://www.mersenne.org/freesoft

    ( http://mersenneforum.org/gimps/p95v2511.zip )

    This article isn't up to date - it doesn't describe the
    current multi-threaded version or Prime95, but it does give
    some discussion and pictures to look at. (Use "stop" and
    then "exit" from the menu, when you're done.)

    http://www.playtool.com/pages/prime95/prime95.html

    In terms of issues I've heard of with DDR2, on retail desktop
    motherboards, there was a difference in stability between 1GB
    DDR2 DIMMs and 2GB DDR2 DIMMs. Early BIOS were not tuned for
    the 2GB sticks, so they showed errors. It took a few BIOS releases
    to fix that, and I don't know technically what the issue was.
    To some extent, the memory chips generally "look the same" now,
    as you go from one density to the next - and exactly what the
    fix was for the denser chips, was never mentioned.

    An SODIMM in a laptop, doesn't have room for as many chips as
    a DIMM in a desktop motherboard. The chips used to make your
    1GB SODIMM, could be the same kind of chips used to make 2GB
    desktop modules (eight chips on SODIMM, sixteen chips on DIMM).
    So that's the only justification I can see for a change in
    behavior (i.e. 2GB type technology, used to make 1GB SODIMM?).

    At this point, I'd rather believe you have one bad stick, and
    test the sticks one at a time, to see if that is the case.
    If both sticks misbehave, when tested individually, then the
    problem might be a BIOS maturity issue. On retail motherboards,
    there can be real differences, from one BIOS release to another,
    as to how stable and error free the system memory is.

    Pre-built computers, don't always have a lot of memory adjustments
    in them, which is why I haven't addressed that as an option.
    In something like a laptop, you're relying on the BIOS automatic
    settings, to be correct for any memory used.

    You can get the CPUZ program from here, and review how your
    current 2x512 modules are set up, versus the new modules. And
    see if there is something significantly different between them.
    The old setup might have been running DDR2-667 (PC2-5300), and
    you'd expect the new setup to be the same. The timings could be
    different, like CAS6 on the old module and CAS5 on the
    new module. That shouldn't make too much difference, unless
    the memory isn't really capable of meeting its CAS value.
    In any case, compare the screens here, for the memory,
    when one or the other pair is installed.

    ( You can use the no-install version. The program doesn't need to
    be installed. )

    http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html

    In the picture here, DRAM frequency times two, gives the speed rating.
    533 * 2 = DDR3-1066 for this particular memory. The timings
    are 7-7-7-20 for that stick. Command Rate 1T, means the
    address/command bus can take one command per clock cycle -
    the more relaxed setting is 2T, where a command is given on
    every second cycle. And this screen, represents the settings
    currently used to run the memory.

    http://www.cpuid.com/medias/images/en/softwares-cpuz-04.jpg

    The other tab (SPD), shows the tables of timing values stored
    on the SODIMM or DIMM. In this example, the memory can be
    run at four different speeds, and the timing values are
    adjusted to make the memory work in each case. So these
    would be potential values. The BIOS uses the table values,
    and does any math necessary, to come up with operating
    conditions for your memory (at least, when the BIOS is
    set to "Auto" for memory).

    http://www.cpuid.com/medias/images/en/softwares-cpuz-05.jpg

    Paul
     
  4. Menno Hershberger

    Menno Hershberger Flightless Bird

    "Paul Richards" <paulrichards@XXXNOSPAMiinet.net.au> wrote in news:
    #WDZgbdMLHA.1172@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl:

    > Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    > start here.
    >
    > I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years now.
    > No problems whatsoever.
    >
    > I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    > correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >
    > With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    > encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    > the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    > all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >
    > I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)


    Like others are saying, try them one at a time.
    I have two memory testing apps, memtest and a Microsoft memory tester.
    I've had one or the other of them run all night without showing an error on
    what turned out to be a bad stick.

    --
    --- Long live Fat32! ---
     
  5. Chuck

    Chuck Flightless Bird

    There is one off the wall issue that I've run into on occasion, come to
    think of it, with HP laptops!
    The video system uses System RAM when the system RAM is increased beyond
    a certain point. More RAM can expose a video driver issue that did not
    occur with a RAM "as shipped" size. There was an unrelated issue with
    bad video chips, but I believe this happened on a different HP Laptop
    series.


    On 8/1/2010 11:11 PM, Menno Hershberger wrote:
    > "Paul Richards"<paulrichards@XXXNOSPAMiinet.net.au> wrote in news:
    > #WDZgbdMLHA.1172@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl:
    >
    >> Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    >> start here.
    >>
    >> I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years now.
    >> No problems whatsoever.
    >>
    >> I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    >> correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >>
    >> With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    >> encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    >> the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    >> all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >>
    >> I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)

    >
    > Like others are saying, try them one at a time.
    > I have two memory testing apps, memtest and a Microsoft memory tester.
    > I've had one or the other of them run all night without showing an error on
    > what turned out to be a bad stick.
    >
     
  6. Justin

    Justin Flightless Bird

    In article <#WDZgbdMLHA.1172@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl>,
    "Paul Richards" <paulrichards@XXXNOSPAMiinet.net.au> wrote:

    > Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    > start here.
    >
    > I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years now.
    > No problems whatsoever.
    >
    > I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    > correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >
    > With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    > encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    > the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    > all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >
    > I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)


    Memtest86.
    get a CD-RW make the ISO and boot from that CD. It will run a memory
    check. Let it run for a few hours and see if you get any red errors.
    http://www.memtest.org/#downiso

    Let's rule out defective RAM since it is so easy.
     
  7. Questor

    Questor Flightless Bird

    I had similar problems trying to upgrade with memory bought from E-bay. I
    finally ordered some from Kingston and had no problems. I think it's best
    to use good quality when it comes to memory.


    "Paul Richards" <paulrichards@XXXNOSPAMiinet.net.au> wrote in message
    news:%23WDZgbdMLHA.1172@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    > start here.
    >
    > I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years now.
    > No problems whatsoever.
    >
    > I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    > correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >
    > With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    > encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    > the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    > all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >
    > I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)
    >
    > --
    > Paul
    > Melbourne, Australia
     
  8. Jim

    Jim Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 01 Aug 2010 17:08:45 -0700, "Paul Richards"
    <paulrichards@XXXNOSPAMiinet.net.au> wrote:

    >Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    >start here.
    >
    >I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years now.
    >No problems whatsoever.
    >
    >I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    >correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >
    >With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    >encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    >the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    >all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >
    >I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)


    Crucial.com or Crucial.co.uk , d/l tester which will let you know what
    memory to use .
     
  9. Db

    Db Flightless Bird

    well we know for sure
    that the 512 chips work.

    so I would install one
    of the chips in the
    first bay

    then install the 1 gig
    chip in the second bay.

    what I think will happen
    is that the pc will be
    functional and you
    can see if it recognizes
    the additional mem

    via msinfo32

    --
    --
    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>

    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    This NNTP newsgroup is evolving to:

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/default.aspx


    "Paul Richards" <paulrichards@XXXNOSPAMiinet.net.au> wrote in message
    news:#WDZgbdMLHA.1172@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    > start here.
    >
    > I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years now.
    > No problems whatsoever.
    >
    > I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    > correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >
    > With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    > encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    > the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    > all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >
    > I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)
    >
    > --
    > Paul
    > Melbourne, Australia
     
  10. Paul Richards

    Paul Richards Flightless Bird

    Paul Richards wrote:

    > Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    > start here.
    >
    > I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years
    > now. No problems whatsoever.
    >
    > I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    > correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >
    > With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    > encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    > the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    > all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >
    > I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)


    Thanks for all the inputs. I've run the extensive tests of the Windows
    Memory Diagnostic tool and one of the RAM chips displayed a number of
    failures (the other one passed all the tests.) So I'm returning the
    failed chip under warranty and hoping a replacement will lead to a
    successful memory upgrade.

    --
    Paul
    Melbourne, Australia
     
  11. Db

    Db Flightless Bird

    glad you found the problem

    however, there is a bit more
    advice to consider.

    it is highly likely (highly)
    that xp will not need
    the additional ram.

    basically, by adding
    2 gigs of ram would
    be wasteful.

    if I recall, xp and all the
    programs it runs will
    only use somewhere
    between 760 and 1 gig.





    --
    --
    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>

    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    This NNTP newsgroup is evolving to:

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/default.aspx


    "Paul Richards" <paulrichards@XXXNOSPAMiinet.net.au> wrote in message
    news:uhl9gcsMLHA.5624@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > Paul Richards wrote:
    >
    >> Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    >> start here.
    >>
    >> I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years
    >> now. No problems whatsoever.
    >>
    >> I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    >> correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >>
    >> With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    >> encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    >> the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    >> all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >>
    >> I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)

    >
    > Thanks for all the inputs. I've run the extensive tests of the Windows
    > Memory Diagnostic tool and one of the RAM chips displayed a number of
    > failures (the other one passed all the tests.) So I'm returning the
    > failed chip under warranty and hoping a replacement will lead to a
    > successful memory upgrade.
    >
    > --
    > Paul
    > Melbourne, Australia
     
  12. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    That is not correct. XP can use all the ram installed. However only about
    3.1 gigs is addressable.
    The remaining .9 gigs is used by hardware.
    "Db" <databaseb~@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:7D63D7CD-D490-4AC8-B5ED-9D8AC75C7E1F@microsoft.com...
    > glad you found the problem
    >
    > however, there is a bit more
    > advice to consider.
    >
    > it is highly likely (highly)
    > that xp will not need
    > the additional ram.
    >
    > basically, by adding
    > 2 gigs of ram would
    > be wasteful.
    >
    > if I recall, xp and all the
    > programs it runs will
    > only use somewhere
    > between 760 and 1 gig.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > --
    > db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    >
    > DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    >
    > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    > This NNTP newsgroup is evolving to:
    >
    > http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/default.aspx
    >
    >
    > "Paul Richards" <paulrichards@XXXNOSPAMiinet.net.au> wrote in message
    > news:uhl9gcsMLHA.5624@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> Paul Richards wrote:
    >>
    >>> Not sure if this is the correct forum but I'm running XP Pro so I'll
    >>> start here.
    >>>
    >>> I've run a HP Pavilion DV6000 with 2 x 512mb RAM chips for 4 years
    >>> now. No problems whatsoever.
    >>>
    >>> I decided to upgrade my memory to 2 x 1gb RAM chips. They are the
    >>> correct specification for the HP machine - I've checked!
    >>>
    >>> With the 2gb memory I started getting program crashes ("Windows has
    >>> encountered an error"-type messages), OS crashes and BSODs. I have use
    >>> the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test the new chips - they passed
    >>> all the standard tests. So what can be the cause of this instability?
    >>>
    >>> I've put my former 2 x 512mb RAM back, and calm is restored :)

    >>
    >> Thanks for all the inputs. I've run the extensive tests of the Windows
    >> Memory Diagnostic tool and one of the RAM chips displayed a number of
    >> failures (the other one passed all the tests.) So I'm returning the
    >> failed chip under warranty and hoping a replacement will lead to a
    >> successful memory upgrade.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Paul
    >> Melbourne, Australia

    >
     
  13. Bob I

    Bob I Flightless Bird

    RAM, virtual memory, pagefile, and memory management in Windows
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2160852

    Db wrote:
    > glad you found the problem
    >
    > however, there is a bit more
    > advice to consider.
    >
    > it is highly likely (highly)
    > that xp will not need
    > the additional ram.
    >
    > basically, by adding
    > 2 gigs of ram would
    > be wasteful.
    >
    > if I recall, xp and all the
    > programs it runs will
    > only use somewhere
    > between 760 and 1 gig.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  14. Tim Slattery

    Tim Slattery Flightless Bird

    "Unknown" <unknown@unknown.kom> wrote:

    >That is not correct. XP can use all the ram installed. However only about
    >3.1 gigs is addressable.
    >The remaining .9 gigs is used by hardware.


    32-bit operating systems - including XP, Vista, and Win7 - have a
    32-bit (4G8) address space. Part of that must be used to access video
    RAM, BIOS, and a few other things. The address space left over after
    those things are taken care of is used to access your system RAM.
    Given the amount of RAM on video boards these days, that usually works
    out to about 3.2 to 3.5 GB of RAM that can be accessed.

    The only way around this is 64-bit computing. In 64-bit land the
    available address space is huge. The actual amount varies according to
    which version of which OS you're using. None at this time come close
    to using the entire 64-bit space (something like 1.8 * 10^18), but all
    implement much more address space than any 32-bit machine.

    --
    Tim Slattery
    Slattery_T@bls.gov
    http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     

Share This Page