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Is it possible to delay services using XP

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by MartinC, May 20, 2010.

  1. MartinC

    MartinC Flightless Bird

    I read an article that stated that 'non essential' services that do not have
    to be loaded at boot time can be set to start delayed so that they start up
    after the machine is up and running.

    This sounded like quite a good idea, but when I go to services.msc and
    select a drop down for the load type, I do not see an option for 'automatic
    delayed'.

    Is this only present on later incarnations of Windows. I have Win XP Home
    SP3.

    TIA

    Martin
     
  2. SC Tom

    SC Tom Flightless Bird

    "MartinC" <invalid@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:%23azoo%23D%23KHA.5476@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    >I read an article that stated that 'non essential' services that do not
    >have to be loaded at boot time can be set to start delayed so that they
    >start up after the machine is up and running.
    >
    > This sounded like quite a good idea, but when I go to services.msc and
    > select a drop down for the load type, I do not see an option for
    > 'automatic delayed'.
    >
    > Is this only present on later incarnations of Windows. I have Win XP Home
    > SP3.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Martin
    >
    >


    Windows 7 has that ability, but not XP Home. I use a little freebie program
    called Startup Delayer
    http://www.r2.com.au/software.php?page=2&show=startdelay

    It's quite simple to use, and even though Win7 is not listed, it works well
    in it, too, for programs rather than services.
    --
    SC Tom
     
  3. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    "MartinC" <invalid@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:#azoo#D#KHA.5476@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > I read an article that stated that 'non essential' services that do not
    > have to be loaded at boot time can be set to start delayed so that they
    > start up after the machine is up and running.
    >
    > This sounded like quite a good idea, but when I go to services.msc and
    > select a drop down for the load type, I do not see an option for
    > 'automatic delayed'.
    >
    > Is this only present on later incarnations of Windows. I have Win XP Home
    > SP3.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Martin
    >


    You could disable the various services via services.msc, then create a batch
    file of this form:
    @echo off
    ping localhost -n 60 > nul
    net start "Service1"
    net start "Service2"
    etc.

    If you launch this batch file via the Task Scheduler, to be run at boot
    time, then you can set when and in which order each service is invoked.
     
  4. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On May 20, 1:12 pm, "MartinC" <inva...@nospam.com> wrote:
    > I read an article that stated that 'non essential' services that do not have
    > to be loaded at boot time can be set to start delayed so that they start up
    > after the machine is up and running.
    >
    > This sounded like quite a good idea, but when I go to services.msc and
    > select a drop down for the load type, I do not see an option for 'automatic
    > delayed'.
    >
    > Is this only present on later incarnations of Windows. I have Win XP Home
    > SP3.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Martin


    If you are trying to reduce the time it takes XP to load from a cold
    boot you should first analyze what you consider to be a typical boot
    sequence and see what is happening. Once you have that information,
    you can decide how to address the issue. It is not that hard to make
    a log of everything that happens when your system boots, examine it
    and see what you need and what you definitely do not need. If you
    need help analyzing, this is the place.

    XP (and third party programs added later) loads many services and
    programs by default with all options enabled so it will fit the needs
    of as many users as possible without too much adjustment. First you
    gotta know how long it takes.

    More is not always better. Loading all the options with programs and
    "enabling all" may seem like a good idea the time of installation, but
    ends up in negative system performance during startup and general
    use. The people that put together these installation packages don't
    care about how long it takes your system to load and it probably works
    great on their super fast systems with a fresh install of XP every
    day. That is not the real world.

    There are likely to be many applications and services loaded on your
    system that may be okay for some people but not right for your
    environment. Disable them! You don't have to uninstall things
    necessarily, just take it out of the boot up process or turn them down
    a bit.

    If your system is slow to boot, first you need to determine (down to
    the tenth of a second) exactly how long it takes, then optimize it the
    best you can by looking at what is loading that you do not need
    (probably lots of things) and measure again to see if things get
    better. There is no guessing - you will know.

    You can't use the subjective "I think it seems a little faster now"
    method and get good results. There are also lots of things you could
    "try" if you have the time to try a lot of things. Avoid suggestions
    that start with the word "try" or disabling "things, culprits, likely
    and suspicious items". That doesn't help you at all. You need things
    to do, not things to try. No matter what method you choose, you need
    to be able to see in a scale of minutes, seconds and fractions of
    seconds to know for sure if you are moving in the right direction - or
    when you have done the best you can possibly do.

    If you use a startup delayer or a batch file, what exactly will you
    delay and how long will you delay it - how do you figure that out???
    (nothing personal SC Tom and Pegasus).

    If it takes your computer too long to be ready for work when you power
    up, consider using hibernation instead of shutting down and cold
    booting.
     
  5. SC Tom

    SC Tom Flightless Bird

    ***- reply in line

    Jose wrote:
    > On May 20, 1:12 pm, "MartinC" <inva...@nospam.com> wrote:
    >> I read an article that stated that 'non essential' services that do
    >> not have to be loaded at boot time can be set to start delayed so
    >> that they start up after the machine is up and running.
    >>
    >> This sounded like quite a good idea, but when I go to services.msc
    >> and select a drop down for the load type, I do not see an option for
    >> 'automatic delayed'.
    >>
    >> Is this only present on later incarnations of Windows. I have Win XP
    >> Home SP3.
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> Martin

    >
    > If you are trying to reduce the time it takes XP to load from a cold
    > boot you should first analyze what you consider to be a typical boot
    > sequence and see what is happening. Once you have that information,
    > you can decide how to address the issue. It is not that hard to make
    > a log of everything that happens when your system boots, examine it
    > and see what you need and what you definitely do not need. If you
    > need help analyzing, this is the place.
    >
    > XP (and third party programs added later) loads many services and
    > programs by default with all options enabled so it will fit the needs
    > of as many users as possible without too much adjustment. First you
    > gotta know how long it takes.
    >
    > More is not always better. Loading all the options with programs and
    > "enabling all" may seem like a good idea the time of installation, but
    > ends up in negative system performance during startup and general
    > use. The people that put together these installation packages don't
    > care about how long it takes your system to load and it probably works
    > great on their super fast systems with a fresh install of XP every
    > day. That is not the real world.
    >
    > There are likely to be many applications and services loaded on your
    > system that may be okay for some people but not right for your
    > environment. Disable them! You don't have to uninstall things
    > necessarily, just take it out of the boot up process or turn them down
    > a bit.
    >
    > If your system is slow to boot, first you need to determine (down to
    > the tenth of a second) exactly how long it takes, then optimize it the
    > best you can by looking at what is loading that you do not need
    > (probably lots of things) and measure again to see if things get
    > better. There is no guessing - you will know.
    >
    > You can't use the subjective "I think it seems a little faster now"
    > method and get good results. There are also lots of things you could
    > "try" if you have the time to try a lot of things. Avoid suggestions
    > that start with the word "try" or disabling "things, culprits, likely
    > and suspicious items". That doesn't help you at all. You need things
    > to do, not things to try. No matter what method you choose, you need
    > to be able to see in a scale of minutes, seconds and fractions of
    > seconds to know for sure if you are moving in the right direction - or
    > when you have done the best you can possibly do.
    >
    > If you use a startup delayer or a batch file, what exactly will you
    > delay and how long will you delay it - how do you figure that out???
    > (nothing personal SC Tom and Pegasus).


    ***- No offense taken :)
    I use the Startup Delayer program on my Win7 notebook to delay the loading
    of a temperature monitoring program (10 seconds) and my Bluetooth drivers
    (11 seconds). If either one of them starts too early, I get an error and
    they don't load. They're not conflicting with each other, but with some
    Windows service (I don't recall which). The Bluetooth is an add-on, not a
    built-in, and if it starts too soon, I get an error message and it won't
    load until I clear the message and manually start it. Same scenario with the
    temp program (Core Temp).
    I didn't do it to speed up the boot process since it boots plenty fast,
    although if I have to clear errors and manually start programs, that
    certainly slows things down. I like this particular delayer, and it plays
    nice with Win7, so I think I'll keep it.
    The numbers I use were arbitrary- I plugged them in and it worked. I've
    never tried shorter times, although since you brought it up, I just might,
    just to see what the optimum time would be. I find it hard not to experiment
    ;-)
    --
    SC Tom

    >
    > If it takes your computer too long to be ready for work when you power
    > up, consider using hibernation instead of shutting down and cold
    > booting.
     
  6. Bob

    Bob Flightless Bird

    WinPatrol (freeware)
    http://www.winpatrol.com/

    From WinPatrol’s help documentation on this feature:

    There may be some programs which you do want to keep running but you don’t
    need to launch immediately on boot up. WinPatrol’s Delayed Startup allows
    you to specify the time to wait before launching programs which may
    typically run instantly when you boot slowing down the initialization of
    Windows.


    "MartinC" <invalid@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:%23azoo%23D%23KHA.5476@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    >I read an article that stated that 'non essential' services that do not
    >have to be loaded at boot time can be set to start delayed so that they
    >start up after the machine is up and running.
    >
    > This sounded like quite a good idea, but when I go to services.msc and
    > select a drop down for the load type, I do not see an option for
    > 'automatic delayed'.
    >
    > Is this only present on later incarnations of Windows. I have Win XP Home
    > SP3.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Martin
    >
    >
     
  7. ju.c

    ju.c Flightless Bird

    How to delay loading of specific services
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/193888/en-us


    ju.c


    "MartinC" <invalid@nospam.com> wrote in message news:#azoo#D#KHA.5476@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > I read an article that stated that 'non essential' services that do not have
    > to be loaded at boot time can be set to start delayed so that they start up
    > after the machine is up and running.
    >
    > This sounded like quite a good idea, but when I go to services.msc and
    > select a drop down for the load type, I do not see an option for 'automatic
    > delayed'.
    >
    > Is this only present on later incarnations of Windows. I have Win XP Home
    > SP3.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Martin
    >
    >
     

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