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Google Earth, Haiti, and my computer

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by mm, Jan 17, 2010.

  1. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    I hope you can help me.

    I installed Google Earth, bought a "new" (to me) video card to make it
    work, and I still can't go closer than 3200 feet or more and still
    have the picture in focus. I can get much closer than that with
    maps.google.com . At least I think so. I checked again and I'm not
    sure. Has anyone else had this?

    I have winXP SP3, with 1 gig memory, 800 MHz, and an ATI Radeon 7000
    series video card with 64 megs of memory.

    A) Don't they use the same photographs?

    8) I'm not trying to do anything fancy, just zoom closer.

    C) Someone on the tv said the damage was so great in Haiti, one could
    see it with Google Earth. Weren't the pictures taken months or
    years ago?

    D) I don't think so but maybe she said you could see evidence of the
    fault line, but like I say, I can't focus well. With
    maps.google.com everything is clear even at the closest zoom, when the
    runway at the Port-au-Prince airport is 1 inch wide on a 17" monitor

    Is there something wrong with my computer set-up?

    Thanks.
     
  2. R. McCarty

    R. McCarty Flightless Bird

    Google Earth is not a real time ( or recent ) satellite image. The view
    of Port-au-Prince is dated March 4, 2008. On most images you can
    have a useable view down to around 1,000 feet. ( Eye Alt shown in
    the lower right corner of the app ). There are a few news sites that do
    have "Before & After" satellite views of the affected areas.
    If the 800 Mhz is your CPU Clock speed you likely do not have the
    necessary processing power to render the Google Earth images in the
    highest detail. The app itself has some settings for detail but I doubt
    they would improve the view you now have.

    "mm" <NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    news:u5a7l5tg1mfho5qijiv3ajprd070pm7h2m@4ax.com...
    >I hope you can help me.
    >
    > I installed Google Earth, bought a "new" (to me) video card to make it
    > work, and I still can't go closer than 3200 feet or more and still
    > have the picture in focus. I can get much closer than that with
    > maps.google.com . At least I think so. I checked again and I'm not
    > sure. Has anyone else had this?
    >
    > I have winXP SP3, with 1 gig memory, 800 MHz, and an ATI Radeon 7000
    > series video card with 64 megs of memory.
    >
    > A) Don't they use the same photographs?
    >
    > 8) I'm not trying to do anything fancy, just zoom closer.
    >
    > C) Someone on the tv said the damage was so great in Haiti, one could
    > see it with Google Earth. Weren't the pictures taken months or
    > years ago?
    >
    > D) I don't think so but maybe she said you could see evidence of the
    > fault line, but like I say, I can't focus well. With
    > maps.google.com everything is clear even at the closest zoom, when the
    > runway at the Port-au-Prince airport is 1 inch wide on a 17" monitor
    >
    > Is there something wrong with my computer set-up?
    >
    > Thanks.
     
  3. Andrew McLaren

    Andrew McLaren Flightless Bird

    > "mm"<NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    > news:u5a7l5tg1mfho5qijiv3ajprd070pm7h2m@4ax.com...
    >> I hope you can help me.
    >>
    >> I installed Google Earth, bought a "new" (to me) video card to make it
    >> Is there something wrong with my computer set-up?


    In addition to R. McCarty's good advice ... Google Maps is sending you
    pre-formatted pictures of the data. So if you come down too low, you get
    the "We're sorry, we don't have have imagery at this zoom level for this
    region" message tiled across the page. They don't have any pictures
    ready to send, at that high resolution. Google Earth, on the other hand,
    is rendering the raw ground data into images, right on your local
    machine. The results may end up blurred if you zoom too low, but you can
    go all the way down to 2 metres.

    Using Google earth on my machine, I can zoom down to about 50 metres
    over Port au Prince, before it gets blurry. That's the same as the
    lowest zoom level I get on Google Maps. I have a pretty standard
    graphics card (GeForce 7000 series, 512M8) although it's probably a bit
    more powerful than the one you're using.

    Google Earth has options to adjust the quality of the rendering. Go to
    the Tools menu, Options, to see the choices. For best results, choose:
    - True Colour (32 bit)
    - Anisotropic Filtering: High
    - Graphics Mode: DirectX
    - Terrain quality: Highest

    This may make it quite slow to draw the images, but the quality will be
    the highest you can get.

    But as R McCarty says, the latest satellite photos of Haiti are from
    March 2008, so you won't see any current conditions. However you can
    identify locations, if you're looking for some particular place.

    I hope you don't have friends or family caught in Port-au-Prince; my
    sincere best wishes, if you do.

    Hope it helps,

    Andrew
    --
    amclar at optusnet dot com dot au
     
  4. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 18 Jan 2010 13:14:49 +1100, Andrew McLaren
    <andrew@somewhere.com> wrote:

    >> "mm"<NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    >> news:u5a7l5tg1mfho5qijiv3ajprd070pm7h2m@4ax.com...
    >>> I hope you can help me.
    >>>
    >>> I installed Google Earth, bought a "new" (to me) video card to make it
    >>> Is there something wrong with my computer set-up?


    Thank you both.

    As to my rather slow processor, I thought that just meant that it
    would take an extra 2 or 3 seconds to show the picture, but that it
    would be the same. The picture does get better after about a second.

    >In addition to R. McCarty's good advice ... Google Maps is sending you
    >pre-formatted pictures of the data. So if you come down too low, you get
    >the "We're sorry, we don't have have imagery at this zoom level for this
    >region" message tiled across the page. They don't have any pictures
    >ready to send, at that high resolution. Google Earth, on the other hand,
    >is rendering the raw ground data into images, right on your local
    >machine. The results may end up blurred if you zoom too low, but you can
    >go all the way down to 2 metres.
    >
    >Using Google earth on my machine, I can zoom down to about 50 metres
    >over Port au Prince, before it gets blurry. That's the same as the
    >lowest zoom level I get on Google Maps. I have a pretty standard
    >graphics card (GeForce 7000 series, 512M8) although it's probably a bit
    >more powerful than the one you're using.
    >
    >Google Earth has options to adjust the quality of the rendering. Go to
    >the Tools menu, Options, to see the choices. For best results, choose:
    >- True Colour (32 bit)
    >- Anisotropic Filtering: High
    >- Graphics Mode: DirectX
    >- Terrain quality: Highest


    I will try these.

    >This may make it quite slow to draw the images, but the quality will be
    >the highest you can get.


    I'll probably only use them when I want to see something in
    particular.
    >
    >But as R McCarty says, the latest satellite photos of Haiti are from
    >March 2008, so you won't see any current conditions. However you can
    >identify locations, if you're looking for some particular place.


    That's what I figured. I don't know what that woman interviewed on
    the news was talking about.

    >I hope you don't have friends or family caught in Port-au-Prince; my
    >sincere best wishes, if you do.


    No. Thank you. In a way I was embarrassedd to mention Haiti in the
    post, because my interest is only that of one who's interested in the
    events of the day. I had this question even before the earthquake
    there. Yet it was that woman on the news who gave a standard I wasn't
    finding.

    My heart aches for those people.

    I heard that it's directly affected (damaged the homes of?) 2 milllion
    of the 9 million people in Haiti.

    >Hope it helps,


    I'm sure it will. Thanks.

    >Andrew
     
  5. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    mm wrote:
    > On Mon, 18 Jan 2010 13:14:49 +1100, Andrew McLaren
    > <andrew@somewhere.com> wrote:
    >
    >>> "mm"<NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:u5a7l5tg1mfho5qijiv3ajprd070pm7h2m@4ax.com...
    >>>> I hope you can help me.
    >>>>
    >>>> I installed Google Earth, bought a "new" (to me) video card to make it
    >>>> Is there something wrong with my computer set-up?

    >
    > Thank you both.
    >
    > As to my rather slow processor, I thought that just meant that it
    > would take an extra 2 or 3 seconds to show the picture, but that it
    > would be the same. The picture does get better after about a second.
    >
    >> In addition to R. McCarty's good advice ... Google Maps is sending you
    >> pre-formatted pictures of the data. So if you come down too low, you get
    >> the "We're sorry, we don't have have imagery at this zoom level for this
    >> region" message tiled across the page. They don't have any pictures
    >> ready to send, at that high resolution. Google Earth, on the other hand,
    >> is rendering the raw ground data into images, right on your local
    >> machine. The results may end up blurred if you zoom too low, but you can
    >> go all the way down to 2 metres.
    >>
    >> Using Google earth on my machine, I can zoom down to about 50 metres
    >> over Port au Prince, before it gets blurry. That's the same as the
    >> lowest zoom level I get on Google Maps. I have a pretty standard
    >> graphics card (GeForce 7000 series, 512M8) although it's probably a bit
    >> more powerful than the one you're using.
    >>
    >> Google Earth has options to adjust the quality of the rendering. Go to
    >> the Tools menu, Options, to see the choices. For best results, choose:
    >> - True Colour (32 bit)
    >> - Anisotropic Filtering: High
    >> - Graphics Mode: DirectX
    >> - Terrain quality: Highest

    >
    > I will try these.
    >
    >> This may make it quite slow to draw the images, but the quality will be
    >> the highest you can get.

    >
    > I'll probably only use them when I want to see something in
    > particular.
    >> But as R McCarty says, the latest satellite photos of Haiti are from
    >> March 2008, so you won't see any current conditions. However you can
    >> identify locations, if you're looking for some particular place.

    >
    > That's what I figured. I don't know what that woman interviewed on
    > the news was talking about.
    >
    >> I hope you don't have friends or family caught in Port-au-Prince; my
    >> sincere best wishes, if you do.

    >
    > No. Thank you. In a way I was embarrassedd to mention Haiti in the
    > post, because my interest is only that of one who's interested in the
    > events of the day. I had this question even before the earthquake
    > there. Yet it was that woman on the news who gave a standard I wasn't
    > finding.
    >
    > My heart aches for those people.
    >
    > I heard that it's directly affected (damaged the homes of?) 2 milllion
    > of the 9 million people in Haiti.
    >
    >> Hope it helps,

    >
    > I'm sure it will. Thanks.
    >
    >> Andrew

    >


    Although the Google Earth imagery date is March 4, 2008, some
    post-earthquake photos have already been uploaded to Google Earth
    (Panoramio). For example
    http://www.panoramio.com/photo/31040481
    http://www.panoramio.com/photo/31048665

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
  6. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    Lem wrote:
    > mm wrote:
    >> On Mon, 18 Jan 2010 13:14:49 +1100, Andrew McLaren
    >> <andrew@somewhere.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>> "mm"<NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    >>>> news:u5a7l5tg1mfho5qijiv3ajprd070pm7h2m@4ax.com...
    >>>>> I hope you can help me.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I installed Google Earth, bought a "new" (to me) video card to make it
    >>>>> Is there something wrong with my computer set-up?

    >>
    >> Thank you both.
    >> As to my rather slow processor, I thought that just meant that it
    >> would take an extra 2 or 3 seconds to show the picture, but that it
    >> would be the same. The picture does get better after about a second.
    >>
    >>> In addition to R. McCarty's good advice ... Google Maps is sending
    >>> you pre-formatted pictures of the data. So if you come down too low,
    >>> you get the "We're sorry, we don't have have imagery at this zoom
    >>> level for this region" message tiled across the page. They don't have
    >>> any pictures ready to send, at that high resolution. Google Earth, on
    >>> the other hand, is rendering the raw ground data into images, right
    >>> on your local machine. The results may end up blurred if you zoom too
    >>> low, but you can go all the way down to 2 metres.
    >>>
    >>> Using Google earth on my machine, I can zoom down to about 50 metres
    >>> over Port au Prince, before it gets blurry. That's the same as the
    >>> lowest zoom level I get on Google Maps. I have a pretty standard
    >>> graphics card (GeForce 7000 series, 512M8) although it's probably a
    >>> bit more powerful than the one you're using.
    >>>
    >>> Google Earth has options to adjust the quality of the rendering. Go
    >>> to the Tools menu, Options, to see the choices. For best results,
    >>> choose:
    >>> - True Colour (32 bit)
    >>> - Anisotropic Filtering: High
    >>> - Graphics Mode: DirectX
    >>> - Terrain quality: Highest

    >>
    >> I will try these.
    >>> This may make it quite slow to draw the images, but the quality will
    >>> be the highest you can get.

    >>
    >> I'll probably only use them when I want to see something in
    >> particular.
    >>> But as R McCarty says, the latest satellite photos of Haiti are from
    >>> March 2008, so you won't see any current conditions. However you can
    >>> identify locations, if you're looking for some particular place.

    >>
    >> That's what I figured. I don't know what that woman interviewed on
    >> the news was talking about.
    >>
    >>> I hope you don't have friends or family caught in Port-au-Prince; my
    >>> sincere best wishes, if you do.

    >>
    >> No. Thank you. In a way I was embarrassedd to mention Haiti in the
    >> post, because my interest is only that of one who's interested in the
    >> events of the day. I had this question even before the earthquake
    >> there. Yet it was that woman on the news who gave a standard I wasn't
    >> finding.
    >> My heart aches for those people.
    >> I heard that it's directly affected (damaged the homes of?) 2 milllion
    >> of the 9 million people in Haiti.
    >>
    >>> Hope it helps,

    >>
    >> I'm sure it will. Thanks.
    >>
    >>> Andrew

    >>

    >
    > Although the Google Earth imagery date is March 4, 2008, some
    > post-earthquake photos have already been uploaded to Google Earth
    > (Panoramio). For example
    > http://www.panoramio.com/photo/31040481
    > http://www.panoramio.com/photo/31048665
    >


    Also, there is an overlay with post-earthquake satellite imagery at
    http://mw1.google.com/mw-earth-vectordb/haiti/Haiti-Earthquake-nl.kml

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
  7. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 18 Jan 2010 11:15:25 -0500, mm <NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com>
    wrote:

    >On Mon, 18 Jan 2010 13:14:49 +1100, Andrew McLaren
    ><andrew@somewhere.com> wrote:
    >
    >>> "mm"<NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:u5a7l5tg1mfho5qijiv3ajprd070pm7h2m@4ax.com...
    >>>> I hope you can help me.
    >>>>
    >>>> I installed Google Earth, bought a "new" (to me) video card to make it
    >>>> Is there something wrong with my computer set-up?

    >
    >Thank you both.
    >
    >As to my rather slow processor, I thought that just meant that it
    >would take an extra 2 or 3 seconds to show the picture, but that it
    >would be the same. The picture does get better after about a second.


    What I meant is, it gets better but not good enough, good as I think
    it shoudl be. Sorry.
     
  8. Andrew McLaren

    Andrew McLaren Flightless Bird

    Google has just updated the images of Haiti on Google Earth. They now
    show satellite images taken around 17 January 2010.

    The devastation around Port au Prince is easy to see, and pretty
    horrific. A quick look should convince us all to redouble our prayers
    and donations for this terrible tragedy.
     

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