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Dual Boot - Win2k *After* Windows 7 (?)

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by croy, Sep 24, 2010.

  1. croy

    croy Flightless Bird

    Now that I've gotten Windows 7 set up and stable, I'd like
    to throw my old Windows 2000 on as a dual boot, so that I
    can run my flatbed scanner.

    Anybody have a link to a page that can keep me out of
    trouble thru this endeavor?

    --
    croy
     
  2. philo

    philo Flightless Bird

    On 09/24/2010 09:15 PM, croy wrote:
    > Now that I've gotten Windows 7 set up and stable, I'd like
    > to throw my old Windows 2000 on as a dual boot, so that I
    > can run my flatbed scanner.
    >
    > Anybody have a link to a page that can keep me out of
    > trouble thru this endeavor?
    >




    Major hassle

    I'd just run win2k in a virtual machine


    FWIW: I have an HP ScanJet 5p
    that works fine in Win7 using the win2k drivers.

    If you want to use win2k drivers in Win7...
    though they may work fine...
    it's at your own risk of course.
     
  3. Stewart

    Stewart Flightless Bird

    I set up a dual booy with windows 7 on one hard drive and windows xp on
    other; this was to be sure that I could run my Epson scanner and printer as
    well as pinnacle software for my camcorder.
    The scanner and printer both run no problem with windows 7 so the dual boot
    was not really needed. Camcorder and pinnacle a bit different as it needs a
    firewire connection etc..
    Can you borrow a laptop and with windows 7 on it and try your scanner? That
    is what I would do, then if OK just go for 7.




    "croy" <hate@spam.invalid.net> wrote in message
    news:aimq96pfs8rfsc197ahab6k925hok4c2u4@4ax.com...
    > Now that I've gotten Windows 7 set up and stable, I'd like
    > to throw my old Windows 2000 on as a dual boot, so that I
    > can run my flatbed scanner.
    >
    > Anybody have a link to a page that can keep me out of
    > trouble thru this endeavor?
    >
    > --
    > croy
     
  4. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    croy wrote:
    > Now that I've gotten Windows 7 set up and stable, I'd like
    > to throw my old Windows 2000 on as a dual boot, so that I
    > can run my flatbed scanner.
    >
    > Anybody have a link to a page that can keep me out of
    > trouble thru this endeavor?
    >


    My recommended recipe, is to install the OSes on separate
    disks. The purpose of doing that, is so either OS can be
    uninstalled, either disk unplugged, either disk trashed,
    without affecting the other.

    First, unplug the Windows 7 hard drive. Install the Win2K
    hard drive. Insert the Win2K CD and install it. Boot
    into Win2K at least once, making sure all is well.

    Now, you can plug in the Windows 7 drive again. Boot
    from the Windows 7 drive. (You would be using the BIOS
    hard drive boot options, to select drives up to this
    point.) Now, use EasyBCD, to add a menu entry to Windows 7,
    and leave the BIOS set up to select the Windows 7 disk
    for booting. When Windows 7 comes up, you'll have the
    menu option for Windows 7 or Win2K at your disposal.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EasyBCD

    http://neosmart.net/gallery/photo/view/neosmart/EasyBCD/EasyBCD+2.0/Add+Entry+Windows+XP+manual/

    I've tested that sequence, inside a VPC2007 virtual machine,
    using the eval version of Windows 7 (32 bit) that you could download,
    and it worked just fine. I had two .vhd disks, and using
    EasyBCD, was able to select which disk to boot from, when
    the Windows 7 disk booted.

    As I understand it, if you're multibooting, you install the
    more modern OS last. If you installed Win2K first, then
    installed Windows 7, the more modern OS recognizes the existence
    of the older OS, and knows how to set up multibooting. In
    the other order (Win2K last), Win2K doesn't know what
    Windows 7 is. I feel the next best alternative, is to do
    something like the procedure I describe above, because
    from a maintenance perspective, it's easier to clean up later.
    With two separate disks, and Easybcd adding a menu entry, that's
    as close as you get to "no strings attached" between the two
    OSes. You can either select an OS for boot, from the BIOS
    disk menu, or boot the Windows 7 partition, and be offered
    the OS choice from there.

    Paul
     
  5. croy

    croy Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 21:24:45 -0500, philo
    <philo@privacy.net> wrote:

    >On 09/24/2010 09:15 PM, croy wrote:
    >> Now that I've gotten Windows 7 set up and stable, I'd like
    >> to throw my old Windows 2000 on as a dual boot, so that I
    >> can run my flatbed scanner.
    >>
    >> Anybody have a link to a page that can keep me out of
    >> trouble thru this endeavor?
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >Major hassle
    >
    >I'd just run win2k in a virtual machine


    Can I do that on this Win7 Home Premium version?

    >FWIW: I have an HP ScanJet 5p
    >that works fine in Win7 using the win2k drivers.


    Two discussion points here: First, it's really not the
    scanner that's holding me up just now, but the SCSI card
    that connects it to the computer. It's an AdvanSys, and it
    seems that the company has gone "poof"! And it is the *one*
    piece of hardware that I can find absolutely no purchase
    record on, and no drivers disk.

    Secondly, my scanner is an HP ScanJet IIc. I bought it
    before Windows 3.1 was available--I had to buy Windows 3.0
    to be able to use the scanner. And even *if* I had a
    working SCSI card, I don't know if the scanner would work in
    Win7 or not.


    >If you want to use win2k drivers in Win7...
    >though they may work fine...
    >it's at your own risk of course.


    --
    croy
     
  6. philo

    philo Flightless Bird

    On 09/25/2010 05:44 PM, croy wrote:
    > On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 21:24:45 -0500, philo
    > <philo@privacy.net> wrote:
    >
    >> On 09/24/2010 09:15 PM, croy wrote:
    >>> Now that I've gotten Windows 7 set up and stable, I'd like
    >>> to throw my old Windows 2000 on as a dual boot, so that I
    >>> can run my flatbed scanner.
    >>>
    >>> Anybody have a link to a page that can keep me out of
    >>> trouble thru this endeavor?
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Major hassle
    >>
    >> I'd just run win2k in a virtual machine

    >
    > Can I do that on this Win7 Home Premium version?



    Although you cannot use Windows Virtual PC

    there are a number of free virtual machines that should work

    such as Virtual Box

    viz:
    https://cds.sun.com/is-bin/INTERSHO...-Start?ProductRef=innotek-1.6-G-F@CDS-CDS_SMI



    >
    >> FWIW: I have an HP ScanJet 5p
    >> that works fine in Win7 using the win2k drivers.

    >
    > Two discussion points here: First, it's really not the
    > scanner that's holding me up just now, but the SCSI card
    > that connects it to the computer. It's an AdvanSys, and it
    > seems that the company has gone "poof"! And it is the *one*
    > piece of hardware that I can find absolutely no purchase
    > record on, and no drivers disk.



    Yep

    I had the same problem...I needed to get my scsi card working first.
    In may case the drivers were no problem to find...
    If the needed drivers are not built in to Win2k
    then installing win2k will do you no good unless you can get the drivers
    somewhere (if you have an existing install with the scsi card drivers in
    it, they could be extracted, however)

    >
    > Secondly, my scanner is an HP ScanJet IIc. I bought it
    > before Windows 3.1 was available--I had to buy Windows 3.0
    > to be able to use the scanner. And even *if* I had a
    > working SCSI card, I don't know if the scanner would work in
    > Win7 or not.
    >



    It may work

    but honestly it may not be worth it as a new USB scanner does not cost
    much...($50)
    and I see them all the time in second hand stores for $5
    >
    >> If you want to use win2k drivers in Win7...
    >> though they may work fine...
    >> it's at your own risk of course.

    >
     
  7. JD

    JD Flightless Bird

    Paul wrote:
    > croy wrote:
    >> Now that I've gotten Windows 7 set up and stable, I'd like
    >> to throw my old Windows 2000 on as a dual boot, so that I
    >> can run my flatbed scanner.
    >>
    >> Anybody have a link to a page that can keep me out of
    >> trouble thru this endeavor?
    >>

    >
    > My recommended recipe, is to install the OSes on separate
    > disks. The purpose of doing that, is so either OS can be
    > uninstalled, either disk unplugged, either disk trashed,
    > without affecting the other.
    >
    > First, unplug the Windows 7 hard drive. Install the Win2K
    > hard drive. Insert the Win2K CD and install it. Boot
    > into Win2K at least once, making sure all is well.
    >
    > Now, you can plug in the Windows 7 drive again. Boot
    > from the Windows 7 drive. (You would be using the BIOS
    > hard drive boot options, to select drives up to this
    > point.) Now, use EasyBCD, to add a menu entry to Windows 7,
    > and leave the BIOS set up to select the Windows 7 disk
    > for booting. When Windows 7 comes up, you'll have the
    > menu option for Windows 7 or Win2K at your disposal.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EasyBCD
    >
    > http://neosmart.net/gallery/photo/view/neosmart/EasyBCD/EasyBCD+2.0/Add+Entry+Windows+XP+manual/
    >
    >
    > I've tested that sequence, inside a VPC2007 virtual machine,
    > using the eval version of Windows 7 (32 bit) that you could download,
    > and it worked just fine. I had two .vhd disks, and using
    > EasyBCD, was able to select which disk to boot from, when
    > the Windows 7 disk booted.
    >
    > As I understand it, if you're multibooting, you install the
    > more modern OS last. If you installed Win2K first, then
    > installed Windows 7, the more modern OS recognizes the existence
    > of the older OS, and knows how to set up multibooting. In
    > the other order (Win2K last), Win2K doesn't know what
    > Windows 7 is. I feel the next best alternative, is to do
    > something like the procedure I describe above, because
    > from a maintenance perspective, it's easier to clean up later.
    > With two separate disks, and Easybcd adding a menu entry, that's
    > as close as you get to "no strings attached" between the two
    > OSes. You can either select an OS for boot, from the BIOS
    > disk menu, or boot the Windows 7 partition, and be offered
    > the OS choice from there.
    >
    > Paul


    I have a NetBook with Win 7 on the C: partition. I
    tried to install Win2K on the D:
    partition but it would not let me.
     
  8. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    JD wrote:

    >
    > I have a NetBook with Win 7 on the C: partition. I tried to install
    > Win2K on the D:
    > partition but it would not let me.


    In principle, I don't see a reason why those two OSes could not
    coexist, stored on the same hard drive.

    It's a matter of coming up with an install (and transfer method),
    to get them both onto the disk.

    For example, say I owned a spare 2.5" SATA drive, and I also had
    a USB hard drive enclosure to hold the 2.5" drive later.

    1) Remove Win7 drive from netbook. Install spare drive.
    2) Install Win2K on spare drive. (Erase spare drive with DBAN,
    if it resists.)
    3) Once you've got all the drivers installed, it boots Win2K OK,
    then it is time to put the Windows 7 drive back in the netbook.
    4) Move the spare drive, into the USB enclosure. Plug the USB
    enclosure into the netbook.
    5) Using "dd", move the Win2K OS partition from the spare drive,
    to D: on the Windows 7 drive.

    For that to work, the partition on the spare drive, would have to
    be the *exact* same size as the D: partition. You could prepare the
    partition first, before starting the Windows install, to be absolutely
    certain it is the same size. Tools like this can help you, when you want
    to verify the numbers.

    ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/tools/pq/utilities/PTEDIT32.zip

    When you copy that partition over with "dd", it doesn't change
    the boot flag which is associated with Windows 7. So Windows 7
    is going to be selected for boot. (The MBR allows one of the four
    primary partitions to be marked "active" via the usage of the
    boot flag.)

    Then, with Windows 7 booted, add an entry in the boot menu (using EasyBCD),
    for your new Win2K. After that, you'll be offered two OS choices when you
    start the laptop from power-off.

    Using "dd" to move the partition over, solves the problem of
    preserving the partition boot sector. If you used "robocopy" to
    copy the contents of the Win2K spare drive install, over to D:,
    you'd get the files alright, but you would lose the partition boot
    sector. Then you'd need to use the recovery console, to do a
    "fixboot" and put it back. Something like robocopy, would allow
    the two partitions (spare disk install partition, and D: partition),
    to be different sizes.

    If you knew of a utility that could copy just the partition boot sector,
    then that would be preferable to having to use the recovery console.
    I hate having to figure out, exactly which partition is the one
    that needs to be fixed.

    So there are ways to get them both on the same disk, but it'll take
    some effort.

    The Windows installer, likely has some logic for checking what it
    finds on the MBR, and declining to install if it sees something it
    doesn't like. The thing is, the Win2K installer is going to want
    to plop its 446 bytes of boot code into the MBR, which would wipe
    out what Windows 7 put there (and that is separate from the partition
    boot sector). So there are good reasons for it not proceeding. Even
    in Windows 7, you have things like Recovery Console, and you could
    do the equivalent of "fixmbr" to repair the damage. I like the
    separate drive approach, because then I'm a bit more in control
    of what happens.

    Paul
     
  9. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    croy wrote:

    <snip>

    > Two discussion points here: First, it's really not the scanner
    > that's holding me up just now, but the SCSI card that connects it to
    > the computer. It's an AdvanSys, and it seems that the company has
    > gone "poof"! And it is the *one* piece of hardware that I can find
    > absolutely no purchase record on, and no drivers disk.
    >
    > Secondly, my scanner is an HP ScanJet IIc. I bought it before
    > Windows 3.1 was available--I had to buy Windows 3.0 to be able to use
    > the scanner. And even *if* I had a working SCSI card, I don't know
    > if the scanner would work in Win7 or not.


    Sounds like it would be a lot simpler to just update the hardware. You
    can get a decent Windows 7 compatible, USB connected scanner for under $100.
    --
    Crash

    "In politics, stupidity is not a handicap."
    ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~
     
  10. philo

    philo Flightless Bird

    On 09/26/2010 12:56 AM, Paul wrote:
    > JD wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I have a NetBook with Win 7 on the C: partition. I tried to install
    >> Win2K on the D:
    >> partition but it would not let me.

    >
    > In principle, I don't see a reason why those two OSes could not
    > coexist, stored on the same hard drive.
    >




    When dual booting different version of Windows...
    one needs to install the older OS first.

    If the order is reversed...and the older OS is installed second...
    the original boot sector is re-written and the ability to boot to the
    newer OS is lost.

    The best way to do it is with a 3rd part boot manager

    or installing the operating systems on different drives
    and booting though the bios drive selector (assuming the bios has that
    option)


    However, that said...this is one time where a new USB scanner is in order.

    If the OP had his scanner since the days of win3x...
    I bet the bulb has little life left in it


    > It's a matter of coming up with an install (and transfer method),
    > to get them both onto the disk.
    >
    > For example, say I owned a spare 2.5" SATA drive, and I also had
    > a USB hard drive enclosure to hold the 2.5" drive later.
    >
    > 1) Remove Win7 drive from netbook. Install spare drive.
    > 2) Install Win2K on spare drive. (Erase spare drive with DBAN,
    > if it resists.)
    > 3) Once you've got all the drivers installed, it boots Win2K OK,
    > then it is time to put the Windows 7 drive back in the netbook.
    > 4) Move the spare drive, into the USB enclosure. Plug the USB
    > enclosure into the netbook.
    > 5) Using "dd", move the Win2K OS partition from the spare drive,
    > to D: on the Windows 7 drive.
    >
    > For that to work, the partition on the spare drive, would have to
    > be the *exact* same size as the D: partition. You could prepare the
    > partition first, before starting the Windows install, to be absolutely
    > certain it is the same size. Tools like this can help you, when you want
    > to verify the numbers.
    >
    > ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/tools/pq/utilities/PTEDIT32.zip
    >
    >
    > When you copy that partition over with "dd", it doesn't change
    > the boot flag which is associated with Windows 7. So Windows 7
    > is going to be selected for boot. (The MBR allows one of the four
    > primary partitions to be marked "active" via the usage of the
    > boot flag.)
    >
    > Then, with Windows 7 booted, add an entry in the boot menu (using EasyBCD),
    > for your new Win2K. After that, you'll be offered two OS choices when you
    > start the laptop from power-off.
    >
    > Using "dd" to move the partition over, solves the problem of
    > preserving the partition boot sector. If you used "robocopy" to
    > copy the contents of the Win2K spare drive install, over to D:,
    > you'd get the files alright, but you would lose the partition boot
    > sector. Then you'd need to use the recovery console, to do a
    > "fixboot" and put it back. Something like robocopy, would allow
    > the two partitions (spare disk install partition, and D: partition),
    > to be different sizes.
    >
    > If you knew of a utility that could copy just the partition boot sector,
    > then that would be preferable to having to use the recovery console.
    > I hate having to figure out, exactly which partition is the one
    > that needs to be fixed.
    >
    > So there are ways to get them both on the same disk, but it'll take
    > some effort.
    >
    > The Windows installer, likely has some logic for checking what it
    > finds on the MBR, and declining to install if it sees something it
    > doesn't like. The thing is, the Win2K installer is going to want
    > to plop its 446 bytes of boot code into the MBR, which would wipe
    > out what Windows 7 put there (and that is separate from the partition
    > boot sector). So there are good reasons for it not proceeding. Even
    > in Windows 7, you have things like Recovery Console, and you could
    > do the equivalent of "fixmbr" to repair the damage. I like the
    > separate drive approach, because then I'm a bit more in control
    > of what happens.
    >
    > Paul
     
  11. JD

    JD Flightless Bird

    philo wrote:
    > On 09/26/2010 12:56 AM, Paul wrote:
    >> JD wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> I have a NetBook with Win 7 on the C: partition. I tried to install
    >>> Win2K on the D:
    >>> partition but it would not let me.

    >>
    >> In principle, I don't see a reason why those two OSes could not
    >> coexist, stored on the same hard drive.
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    > When dual booting different version of Windows...
    > one needs to install the older OS first.
    >
    > If the order is reversed...and the older OS is installed second...
    > the original boot sector is re-written and the ability to boot to the
    > newer OS is lost.
    >
    > The best way to do it is with a 3rd part boot manager
    >
    > or installing the operating systems on different drives
    > and booting though the bios drive selector (assuming the bios has that
    > option)
    >
    >
    > However, that said...this is one time where a new USB scanner is in order.
    >
    > If the OP had his scanner since the days of win3x...
    > I bet the bulb has little life left in it
    >
    >
    >> It's a matter of coming up with an install (and transfer method),
    >> to get them both onto the disk.
    >>
    >> For example, say I owned a spare 2.5" SATA drive, and I also had
    >> a USB hard drive enclosure to hold the 2.5" drive later.
    >>
    >> 1) Remove Win7 drive from netbook. Install spare drive.
    >> 2) Install Win2K on spare drive. (Erase spare drive with DBAN,
    >> if it resists.)
    >> 3) Once you've got all the drivers installed, it boots Win2K OK,
    >> then it is time to put the Windows 7 drive back in the netbook.
    >> 4) Move the spare drive, into the USB enclosure. Plug the USB
    >> enclosure into the netbook.
    >> 5) Using "dd", move the Win2K OS partition from the spare drive,
    >> to D: on the Windows 7 drive.
    >>
    >> For that to work, the partition on the spare drive, would have to
    >> be the *exact* same size as the D: partition. You could prepare the
    >> partition first, before starting the Windows install, to be absolutely
    >> certain it is the same size. Tools like this can help you, when you want
    >> to verify the numbers.
    >>
    >> ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/tools/pq/utilities/PTEDIT32.zip
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> When you copy that partition over with "dd", it doesn't change
    >> the boot flag which is associated with Windows 7. So Windows 7
    >> is going to be selected for boot. (The MBR allows one of the four
    >> primary partitions to be marked "active" via the usage of the
    >> boot flag.)
    >>
    >> Then, with Windows 7 booted, add an entry in the boot menu (using
    >> EasyBCD),
    >> for your new Win2K. After that, you'll be offered two OS choices when you
    >> start the laptop from power-off.
    >>
    >> Using "dd" to move the partition over, solves the problem of
    >> preserving the partition boot sector. If you used "robocopy" to
    >> copy the contents of the Win2K spare drive install, over to D:,
    >> you'd get the files alright, but you would lose the partition boot
    >> sector. Then you'd need to use the recovery console, to do a
    >> "fixboot" and put it back. Something like robocopy, would allow
    >> the two partitions (spare disk install partition, and D: partition),
    >> to be different sizes.
    >>
    >> If you knew of a utility that could copy just the partition boot sector,
    >> then that would be preferable to having to use the recovery console.
    >> I hate having to figure out, exactly which partition is the one
    >> that needs to be fixed.
    >>
    >> So there are ways to get them both on the same disk, but it'll take
    >> some effort.
    >>
    >> The Windows installer, likely has some logic for checking what it
    >> finds on the MBR, and declining to install if it sees something it
    >> doesn't like. The thing is, the Win2K installer is going to want
    >> to plop its 446 bytes of boot code into the MBR, which would wipe
    >> out what Windows 7 put there (and that is separate from the partition
    >> boot sector). So there are good reasons for it not proceeding. Even
    >> in Windows 7, you have things like Recovery Console, and you could
    >> do the equivalent of "fixmbr" to repair the damage. I like the
    >> separate drive approach, because then I'm a bit more in control
    >> of what happens.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >


    Thank you Paul and Philo for the great responses.

    Hope you're enjoying the weekend :)
     
  12. Roy Smith

    Roy Smith Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 26 Sep 2010 07:40:08 -0400, "Dave \"Crash\" Dummy"
    <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:

    >croy wrote:
    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >> Two discussion points here: First, it's really not the scanner
    >> that's holding me up just now, but the SCSI card that connects it to
    >> the computer. It's an AdvanSys, and it seems that the company has
    >> gone "poof"! And it is the *one* piece of hardware that I can find
    >> absolutely no purchase record on, and no drivers disk.
    >>
    >> Secondly, my scanner is an HP ScanJet IIc. I bought it before
    >> Windows 3.1 was available--I had to buy Windows 3.0 to be able to use
    >> the scanner. And even *if* I had a working SCSI card, I don't know
    >> if the scanner would work in Win7 or not.

    >
    >Sounds like it would be a lot simpler to just update the hardware. You
    >can get a decent Windows 7 compatible, USB connected scanner for under $100.


    Yup... I just recently went to Wal-Mart and bought a Canon Pixma MX340
    for $79.00. It's a all-in-one printer, fax, scanner and copier that
    also has USB and WiFi connection capabilities. Have it connected via
    WiFi to the network so that any of my PC's at home can use it over the
    network.


    --

    Roy Smith
    Windows 7 Professional
    Forte Agent 6.0
     
  13. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    Roy Smith wrote:
    > On Sun, 26 Sep 2010 07:40:08 -0400, "Dave \"Crash\" Dummy"
    > <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> croy wrote:
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>> Two discussion points here: First, it's really not the scanner
    >>> that's holding me up just now, but the SCSI card that connects it to
    >>> the computer. It's an AdvanSys, and it seems that the company has
    >>> gone "poof"! And it is the *one* piece of hardware that I can find
    >>> absolutely no purchase record on, and no drivers disk.
    >>>
    >>> Secondly, my scanner is an HP ScanJet IIc. I bought it before
    >>> Windows 3.1 was available--I had to buy Windows 3.0 to be able to use
    >>> the scanner. And even *if* I had a working SCSI card, I don't know
    >>> if the scanner would work in Win7 or not.

    >> Sounds like it would be a lot simpler to just update the hardware. You
    >> can get a decent Windows 7 compatible, USB connected scanner for under $100.

    >
    > Yup... I just recently went to Wal-Mart and bought a Canon Pixma MX340
    > for $79.00. It's a all-in-one printer, fax, scanner and copier that
    > also has USB and WiFi connection capabilities. Have it connected via
    > WiFi to the network so that any of my PC's at home can use it over the
    > network.


    Great Minds, etc. I just bought a Canon Pixma MP560 for about that
    price, also at Walmart.
    --
    Crash

    "The real question is not whether machines think but whether men do."
    ~ B. F. Skinner ~
     
  14. croy

    croy Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 26 Sep 2010 07:40:08 -0400, "Dave \"Crash\" Dummy"
    <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:

    >croy wrote:
    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >> Two discussion points here: First, it's really not the scanner
    >> that's holding me up just now, but the SCSI card that connects it to
    >> the computer. It's an AdvanSys, and it seems that the company has
    >> gone "poof"! And it is the *one* piece of hardware that I can find
    >> absolutely no purchase record on, and no drivers disk.
    >>
    >> Secondly, my scanner is an HP ScanJet IIc. I bought it before
    >> Windows 3.1 was available--I had to buy Windows 3.0 to be able to use
    >> the scanner. And even *if* I had a working SCSI card, I don't know
    >> if the scanner would work in Win7 or not.

    >
    >Sounds like it would be a lot simpler to just update the hardware. You
    >can get a decent Windows 7 compatible, USB connected scanner for under $100.


    Well, there's one more kicker: I've also got a Nikon film
    scanner that also needs to run from a SCSI card.

    Somebody over in alt.comp.periphs.scanner has it worked out.
    It requires a different SCSI card than the one I have, but
    I'll check the surplus store around the corner later today,
    and see if they have one (or a pile of them).

    --
    croy
     
  15. croy

    croy Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 27 Sep 2010 07:05:56 -0700, croy <croy@invalid.net>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 26 Sep 2010 07:40:08 -0400, "Dave \"Crash\" Dummy"
    ><invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >>croy wrote:
    >>
    >><snip>
    >>
    >>> Two discussion points here: First, it's really not the scanner
    >>> that's holding me up just now, but the SCSI card that connects it to
    >>> the computer. It's an AdvanSys, and it seems that the company has
    >>> gone "poof"! And it is the *one* piece of hardware that I can find
    >>> absolutely no purchase record on, and no drivers disk.
    >>>
    >>> Secondly, my scanner is an HP ScanJet IIc. I bought it before
    >>> Windows 3.1 was available--I had to buy Windows 3.0 to be able to use
    >>> the scanner. And even *if* I had a working SCSI card, I don't know
    >>> if the scanner would work in Win7 or not.

    >>
    >>Sounds like it would be a lot simpler to just update the hardware. You
    >>can get a decent Windows 7 compatible, USB connected scanner for under $100.

    >
    >Well, there's one more kicker: I've also got a Nikon film
    >scanner that also needs to run from a SCSI card.
    >
    >Somebody over in alt.comp.periphs.scanner has it worked out.
    >It requires a different SCSI card than the one I have, but
    >I'll check the surplus store around the corner later today,
    >and see if they have one (or a pile of them).


    The surplus store came through! Snagged a AHA-2940AU for
    $10. Got the Vista drivers for that from Adaptec. Followed
    Barry's guide, and now have my HP ScanJet IIc working in
    Windows 7.

    I don't think I had/have any other reason to dual-boot to
    Win2k, so it looks like I'm done here.

    Thanks to all who replied here.

    --
    croy
     

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