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Drive letter still there but says not formatted now

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by BertieBigBollox@gmail.com, May 4, 2010.

  1. BertieBigBollox@gmail.com

    BertieBigBollox@gmail.com Flightless Bird

    Weird. D: appears to be still there but when I click on it, it says
    drive is unformatted, do you want to format?

    Any ideas how to fix this? If I do choose to format, what are the
    chances of recovering files that were on there before format?
     
  2. Michael

    Michael Flightless Bird

    How about a little background, sparky? If you format you'll lose
    everything on it.

    --


    "Don't pick a fight with an old man.
    If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you."


    "BertieBigBollox@gmail.com" <bertiebigbollox@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:2a7b5fef-ca36-489b-ab7e-cfc96cd7f1ae@24g2000yqy.googlegroups.com...
    > Weird. D: appears to be still there but when I click on it, it says
    > drive is unformatted, do you want to format?
    >
    > Any ideas how to fix this? If I do choose to format, what are the
    > chances of recovering files that were on there before format?
     
  3. John John - MVP

    John John - MVP Flightless Bird

    BertieBigBollox@gmail.com wrote:
    > Weird. D: appears to be still there but when I click on it, it says
    > drive is unformatted, do you want to format?
    >
    > Any ideas how to fix this? If I do choose to format, what are the
    > chances of recovering files that were on there before format?


    I suspect that the drive is shown as a "RAW" drive, usually a sign of
    boot sector damage or incorrect partition type in the MBR. Recovery
    utilities usually handle this problem quite well. See here:
    http://www.z-a-recovery.com/art-raw-filesystem.htm You could also try
    TestDisk and see if it can recover the drive.

    John
     
  4. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    BertieBigBollox@gmail.com wrote:
    > Weird. D: appears to be still there but when I click on it, it says
    > drive is unformatted, do you want to format?
    >
    > Any ideas how to fix this? If I do choose to format, what are the
    > chances of recovering files that were on there before format?


    Well, formatting isn't going to be helping you, and can only
    harm the data. So don't do that.

    Use a data recovery program, to try to get your files back.
    Make sure you have enough space, on some other hard drive, to
    write the recovered files. Don't try to write the files
    onto the existing, damaged drive. Data recovery programs
    only do read operations on the damaged disk, and should be
    doing any writes to space you're providing on another hard
    drive.

    If you want a freebie to try, this is supposed to rescue files
    from NTFS. At least one other poster, managed to get files back
    from an NTFS partition. Plug in a drive with some space on it
    (like an external USB hard drive), so you'll have room to store
    the files.

    http://www.pricelesswarehome.org/WoundedMoon/win32/driverescue19d.html

    Once all your files are safe, you can worry about formatting,
    reinstalling, or any other kinds of destructive operations.
    While doing those things, make sure your new USB external drive,
    has been "Safely Removed" and shut off. (Use the "Safely Remove" icon
    in the tray, to flush the cache on the drive.) When you're ready, you can
    move the files back, for any files important enough to keep.

    With regard to tools such as chkdsk. Chkdsk is a "repair in place" tool
    That means, it makes changes to the drive, which could either be a
    positive or a negative thing. For example, repair programs can
    actually make things worse, in the process of making repairs. That
    is because they lack human judgment. For example, if a human saw
    a certain pattern of damage, they might stop all repair work, concluding
    there are mechanical or electrical problems. A program like chkdsk,
    may do more harm than good. If your intention is to use "repair in place"
    tools, then doing a sector by sector backup of the damaged drive is a
    good idea. A sector by sector backup, doesn't need a working file system,
    to do its job. I do these, using a port of "dd", or boot a Linux LiveCD
    and use a copy of "dd" there, to copy the damaged disk.

    With my approach, you can see why I might recommend the purchase of two
    spare drives. One drive contains the sector by sector backup. The other
    drive might hold any recovered files. It all depends on whether your
    tools are "repair in place" type, or "scavengers". If the files are valuable
    to you, then they're worth buying a couple spare drives. Once you own the
    spare drives, they can also be used for regular backups.

    Chkdsk can attempt to repair a partition. Normally, you feed it a drive
    letter, and let it run. If you still have a working drive letter, that
    might work. (Of course, on your next reboot, the drive letter could
    disappear for good. So don't depend on that letter to stay there.)
    Chkdsk can also take a pointer to a "raw partition", but you still need
    an identifier to tell it what you want repaired. There are more details here.
    They use "mountvol" to get the identifier.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb457122.aspx

    chkdsk \\?\Volume{2d9bd2a8-5df8-11d2-bdaa-000000000000}

    In the data recovery business, never assume your difficult situation
    is stable. For example, on the very next reboot, you could lose access
    to the drive entirely. So your first priority, is to "not panic", and
    prioritize the things you do next, in some kind of order. For example,
    if you get the sector by sector backup to work, then even if the drive
    suffers hardware failure, your data is not lost. It will be much cheaper,
    to take your sector by sector backup to a local IT specialist and have
    the data restored, than it would be to have to send a broken drive
    to a place that recovers data from dead drives. (It is easy to copy
    the sector by sector backup, to another drive, but whatever is wrong
    with the file system in there, still would need to be fixed.)

    To give an example, one night, I had something strange happen to a drive.
    (Could hear "clicking and whirring", from the drive doing restarts.)
    But I was tired and decided to shut off the computer and worry about it
    the next day. When I turned on the computer the next day, the drive and
    the data were gone for good. If I'd put the effort into it, at that
    point in time, I might have been able to keep the data.

    HTH,
    Paul
     
  5. Peter Foldes

    Peter Foldes Flightless Bird

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb457122.aspx

    --
    Peter

    Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
    Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.
    http://www.microsoft.com/protect

    "BertieBigBollox@gmail.com" <bertiebigbollox@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:2a7b5fef-ca36-489b-ab7e-cfc96cd7f1ae@24g2000yqy.googlegroups.com...
    > Weird. D: appears to be still there but when I click on it, it says
    > drive is unformatted, do you want to format?
    >
    > Any ideas how to fix this? If I do choose to format, what are the
    > chances of recovering files that were on there before format?
     
  6. Percival P. Cassidy

    Percival P. Cassidy Flightless Bird

    On 05/04/10 10:49 am, BertieBigBollox@gmail.com wrote:

    > Weird. D: appears to be still there but when I click on it, it says
    > drive is unformatted, do you want to format?
    >
    > Any ideas how to fix this? If I do choose to format, what are the
    > chances of recovering files that were on there before format?


    I had this problem on one machine with floppies and USB drives that were
    readable on other machines. The only way I could find to solve the
    problem was to reinstall the OS.

    Perce
     
  7. Meat Plow

    Meat Plow Flightless Bird

    On Tue, 4 May 2010 07:49:37 -0700 (PDT), "BertieBigBollox@gmail.com"
    <bertiebigbollox@gmail.com>wrote:

    >Weird. D: appears to be still there but when I click on it, it says
    >drive is unformatted, do you want to format?
    >
    >Any ideas how to fix this? If I do choose to format, what are the
    >chances of recovering files that were on there before format?


    CALLING DAN C. CALLING DAN C. !!!
     
  8. thedockson

    thedockson Flightless Bird

    BertieBigBollox@gmail.com wrote:
    > Weird. D: appears to be still there but when I click on it, it says
    > drive is unformatted, do you want to format?
    >
    > Any ideas how to fix this? If I do choose to format, what are the
    > chances of recovering files that were on there before format?


    You maybe could use a live linix cd and drag the files to the working
    drive if it shows them intact.
     
  9. BertieBigBollox@gmail.com

    BertieBigBollox@gmail.com Flightless Bird

    On May 4, 5:19 pm, John John - MVP <audetw...@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote:
    > BertieBigBol...@gmail.com wrote:
    > > Weird. D: appears to be still there but when I click on it, it says
    > > drive is unformatted, do you want to format?

    >
    > > Any ideas how to fix this? If I do choose to format, what are the
    > > chances of recovering files that were on there before format?

    >
    > I suspect that the drive is shown as a "RAW" drive, usually a sign of
    > boot sector damage or incorrect partition type in the MBR.  Recovery
    > utilities usually handle this problem quite well.  See here:http://www.z-a-recovery.com/art-raw-filesystem.htm You could also try
    > TestDisk and see if it can recover the drive.
    >
    > John


    Tried TestDisk but didnt fix the problem...
     

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