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Defragmentation frequency

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by quset, Jan 23, 2010.

  1. quset

    quset Flightless Bird

    I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD’s and movies.
    I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the HHD.
    After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often, Defrag shows
    blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run Defrag multiple times in
    order to clean them up before burning the CD's.

    I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop (Windows 7
    64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may damage my system -
    for W 7, he said to just run it every other month.

    I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?
    1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?
    2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?
    TIA
     
  2. Jim

    Jim Flightless Bird

    "quset" <quset@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:33B09657-1F0C-4172-BF22-B73D7E976940@microsoft.com...
    >I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD's and movies.
    > I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the HHD.
    > After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often, Defrag shows
    > blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run Defrag multiple times
    > in
    > order to clean them up before burning the CD's.
    >
    > I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop (Windows 7
    > 64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may damage my
    > system -
    > for W 7, he said to just run it every other month.
    >
    > I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?
    > 1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?
    > 2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?
    > TIA

    (1) Don't see how defragmenting too often damages the system. It surely
    doesn't hurt the drives.
    (2) Every now and then is soon enough. In my case, I tend to defrag every
    few months whether it needs it or not.
    I have never had trouble with fragmented files bothering backups to CD or
    DVD.
    Jim
     
  3. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Sat, 23 Jan 2010 15:21:01 -0800, quset
    <quset@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    > I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD’s and movies.
    > I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the HHD.
    > After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often, Defrag shows
    > blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run Defrag multiple times in
    > order to clean them up before burning the CD's.
    >
    > I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop (Windows 7
    > 64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may damage my system -



    Sigh! That's complete nonsense, and he doesn't know what he's talking
    about.



    > for W 7, he said to just run it every other month.
    >
    > I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?




    There's no answer that's right for everyone. It depends on how you use
    your computer and it depends on how much you use your computer.

    You should defragment your drive when doing so results in a speed up.
    Here's what I recommend. Pick some arbitrary interval--for example
    once a month. Defragment on that interval a few times, and assess
    whether the computer generally feels faster after doing so. If the
    answer is yes, defrag more frequently. If the answer is no, defrag
    less frequently.

    Repeat a few times, and you'll soon settle into a frequency that works
    well for you.

    Every other month isn't unlikely to be a good frequency.



    > 1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?



    No real difference for different operating systems.



    > 2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?



    See above.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  4. HeyBub

    HeyBub Flightless Bird

    quset wrote:
    > I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD's and movies.
    > I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the HHD.
    > After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often, Defrag
    > shows blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run Defrag
    > multiple times in order to clean them up before burning the CD's.
    >
    > I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop
    > (Windows 7 64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may
    > damage my system - for W 7, he said to just run it every other month.
    >
    > I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?
    > 1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?
    > 2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?
    > TIA


    Assuming: 1) NTFS file system, 2) Ample unused space on the drive, and 3)
    Usage is within that of 90% of computer users, THEN the appropriate time
    interval between defragmentation runs is measured in decades.

    There is usually no compelling reason to defragment an NTFS volume.
     
  5. Big_Al

    Big_Al Flightless Bird

    quset said this on 1/23/2010 6:21 PM:
    > I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD’s and movies.
    > I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the HHD.
    > After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often, Defrag shows
    > blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run Defrag multiple times in
    > order to clean them up before burning the CD's.
    >
    > I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop (Windows 7
    > 64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may damage my system -
    > for W 7, he said to just run it every other month.
    >
    > I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?
    > 1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?
    > 2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?
    > TIA


    The only reason for damage just might be the wear and tear on the servo
    motor for moving the heads as it does exercise the heads a lot. The
    drive motor is spinning no matter what.
     
  6. R. McCarty

    R. McCarty Flightless Bird

    Your conclusion doesn't meet with my "Real World" experience. I work
    on computers all the time that have never been defragged. Sometimes the
    total fragmentation level is in excess of 25-30%. These are systems that
    have been running anywhere from 2 to 5 years. Because of the extreme
    fragmentation some file fragments may exist all the way to the last portion
    of clusters on the volume.
    Doing a full defrag on those machines can take hours to complete. If they
    had been defragged on almost any schedule the performance of the PC
    would not have degraded as much as they had when they came in for
    servicing.
    I really wish people would not try to convince others that NTFS volumes
    do not need defragmenting. The only case in which that might be true is
    if the physical drive itself is an SSD.

    "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:-OWg6ezKnKHA.4628@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > quset wrote:
    >> I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD's and movies.
    >> I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the HHD.
    >> After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often, Defrag
    >> shows blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run Defrag
    >> multiple times in order to clean them up before burning the CD's.
    >>
    >> I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop
    >> (Windows 7 64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may
    >> damage my system - for W 7, he said to just run it every other month.
    >>
    >> I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?
    >> 1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?
    >> 2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?
    >> TIA

    >
    > Assuming: 1) NTFS file system, 2) Ample unused space on the drive, and 3)
    > Usage is within that of 90% of computer users, THEN the appropriate time
    > interval between defragmentation runs is measured in decades.
    >
    > There is usually no compelling reason to defragment an NTFS volume.
    >
     
  7. C

    C Flightless Bird

    R. McCarty wrote:
    > Your conclusion doesn't meet with my "Real World" experience. I work
    > on computers all the time that have never been defragged. Sometimes the
    > total fragmentation level is in excess of 25-30%. These are systems that
    > have been running anywhere from 2 to 5 years. Because of the extreme
    > fragmentation some file fragments may exist all the way to the last portion
    > of clusters on the volume.
    > Doing a full defrag on those machines can take hours to complete. If they
    > had been defragged on almost any schedule the performance of the PC
    > would not have degraded as much as they had when they came in for
    > servicing.
    > I really wish people would not try to convince others that NTFS volumes
    > do not need defragmenting. The only case in which that might be true is
    > if the physical drive itself is an SSD.


    I really wish people like you wouldn't post such erroneous nonsense.

    --
    C
     
  8. db

    db Flightless Bird

    defragmenting the drive is a good idea.

    you can actually do as often as you like.

    however, you will soon realize that the
    more frequent you defrag the more
    boring it can become.

    one thing to defrag are the registry files.

    however, this can be done by a utility
    called pagedefrag and is a freeware from
    microsoft.com

    if you set it to run a boot time, the
    registry hives, including other system
    files will be defragged before windows
    loads the desktop.

    incidentally, because hard drives
    are extremely fast and if you have
    a large drive, say over 80 gig's
    defragging user files and third
    party programs won't really be
    necessary,

    unless you get bored.

    lastly, be sure to run a check
    disk before defragging.

    it will help ensure that the
    file system is indexed with the
    master file table.


    --
    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    - Systems Analyst
    - Database Developer
    - Accountancy
    - Veteran of the Armed Forces
    - @Hotmail.com
    - nntp Postologist
    ~ "share the nirvana" - dbZen

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    >
    >


    "quset" <quset@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:33B09657-1F0C-4172-BF22-B73D7E976940@microsoft.com...
    > I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD’s and movies.
    > I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the HHD.
    > After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often, Defrag shows
    > blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run Defrag multiple times
    > in
    > order to clean them up before burning the CD's.
    >
    > I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop (Windows 7
    > 64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may damage my
    > system -
    > for W 7, he said to just run it every other month.
    >
    > I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?
    > 1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?
    > 2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?
    > TIA
     
  9. C

    C Flightless Bird

    C wrote:
    > R. McCarty wrote:
    >> Your conclusion doesn't meet with my "Real World" experience. I work
    >> on computers all the time that have never been defragged. Sometimes the
    >> total fragmentation level is in excess of 25-30%. These are systems that
    >> have been running anywhere from 2 to 5 years. Because of the extreme
    >> fragmentation some file fragments may exist all the way to the last
    >> portion
    >> of clusters on the volume.
    >> Doing a full defrag on those machines can take hours to complete. If
    >> they
    >> had been defragged on almost any schedule the performance of the PC
    >> would not have degraded as much as they had when they came in for
    >> servicing.
    >> I really wish people would not try to convince others that NTFS volumes
    >> do not need defragmenting. The only case in which that might be true is
    >> if the physical drive itself is an SSD.

    >
    > I really wish people like you wouldn't post such erroneous nonsense.
    >


    Sorry, I misread your post and thought you were recommending not defragging.

    --
    C
     
  10. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    How can you make such a ridiculous statement?
    "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:-OWg6ezKnKHA.4628@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > quset wrote:
    >> I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD's and movies.
    >> I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the HHD.
    >> After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often, Defrag
    >> shows blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run Defrag
    >> multiple times in order to clean them up before burning the CD's.
    >>
    >> I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop
    >> (Windows 7 64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may
    >> damage my system - for W 7, he said to just run it every other month.
    >>
    >> I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?
    >> 1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?
    >> 2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?
    >> TIA

    >
    > Assuming: 1) NTFS file system, 2) Ample unused space on the drive, and 3)
    > Usage is within that of 90% of computer users, THEN the appropriate time
    > interval between defragmentation runs is measured in decades.
    >
    > There is usually no compelling reason to defragment an NTFS volume.
    >
     
  11. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:hjhhkp$rf5$1@speranza.aioe.org,
    C <nospamming@please.com.invalid> typed:
    > R. McCarty wrote:
    >> Your conclusion doesn't meet with my "Real World" experience. I work
    >> on computers all the time that have never been defragged. Sometimes
    >> the total fragmentation level is in excess of 25-30%. These are
    >> systems that have been running anywhere from 2 to 5 years. Because
    >> of the extreme fragmentation some file fragments may exist all the
    >> way to the last portion of clusters on the volume.
    >> Doing a full defrag on those machines can take hours to complete.
    >> If they had been defragged on almost any schedule the performance of
    >> the PC
    >> would not have degraded as much as they had when they came in for
    >> servicing.
    >> I really wish people would not try to convince others that NTFS
    >> volumes do not need defragmenting. The only case in which that might
    >> be true is
    >> if the physical drive itself is an SSD.

    >
    > I really wish people like you wouldn't post such erroneous nonsense.


    You are posting the erroneous nonsense. Get real and then get a life.
     
  12. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:-O6pBZpUnKHA.5700@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl,
    Unknown <unknown@unknown.kom> typed:
    > How can you make such a ridiculous statement?
    > "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:-OWg6ezKnKHA.4628@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    >> quset wrote:
    >>> I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD's and movies.
    >>> I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the
    >>> HHD. After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often,
    >>> Defrag shows blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run
    >>> Defrag multiple times in order to clean them up before burning the
    >>> CD's. I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop
    >>> (Windows 7 64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may
    >>> damage my system - for W 7, he said to just run it every other
    >>> month. I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?
    >>> 1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?
    >>> 2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?
    >>> TIA

    >>
    >> Assuming: 1) NTFS file system, 2) Ample unused space on the drive,
    >> and 3) Usage is within that of 90% of computer users, THEN the
    >> appropriate time interval between defragmentation runs is measured
    >> in decades. There is usually no compelling reason to defragment an NTFS
    >> volume.


    You must be referring to computers that are used maybe twice per decade.
    Otherwise you're an idiot and I hope you follow you own advice faithfully.
     
  13. Leythos

    Leythos Flightless Bird

    In article <OWg6ezKnKHA.4628@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl>, heybub@gmail.com
    says...
    > Assuming: 1) NTFS file system, 2) Ample unused space on the drive, and 3)
    > Usage is within that of 90% of computer users, THEN the appropriate time
    > interval between defragmentation runs is measured in decades.
    >
    > There is usually no compelling reason to defragment an NTFS volume.
    >


    It doesn't matter how much free space you have or what size drive, the
    real and only valid question is how fragmented are files - meaning how
    many files are not stored in contiguous segments on the drive.

    The more you add AND delete AND add to/from your computer, even if you
    have 100TB of free space, the more you will fragment files.

    While a small percentage of file fragmentation will be almost
    unnoticeable, it can be noticed when you hit a significantly larger
    amount for files that you access frequently.

    --
    You can't trust your best friends, your five senses, only the little
    voice inside you that most civilians don't even hear -- Listen to that.
    Trust yourself.
    spam999free@rrohio.com (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
  14. Tim Slattery

    Tim Slattery Flightless Bird

    quset <quset@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD’s and movies.
    >I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the HHD.
    >After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often, Defrag shows
    >blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run Defrag multiple times in
    >order to clean them up before burning the CD's.


    There's no reason to get your hard drive perfectly defragged before
    writing something to a DVD. The way it's stored on the hard drive has
    NOTHING to do with the way it's written to the DVD.

    >I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop (Windows 7
    >64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may damage my system -
    >for W 7, he said to just run it every other month.

    ]
    >I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?


    It's not correct.

    >1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?


    It's the case for neither.

    >2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?


    As often as you like, I suppose, but really you don't need to worry
    about it.

    --
    Tim Slattery
    Slattery_T@bls.gov
    http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     
  15. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    Please respond to the correct poster.
    "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote in message
    news:%23HrRcCXnKHA.5312@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > In news:-O6pBZpUnKHA.5700@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl,
    > Unknown <unknown@unknown.kom> typed:
    >> How can you make such a ridiculous statement?
    >> "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:-OWg6ezKnKHA.4628@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    >>> quset wrote:
    >>>> I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD's and movies.
    >>>> I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the
    >>>> HHD. After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often,
    >>>> Defrag shows blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run
    >>>> Defrag multiple times in order to clean them up before burning the
    >>>> CD's. I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop
    >>>> (Windows 7 64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may
    >>>> damage my system - for W 7, he said to just run it every other
    >>>> month. I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?
    >>>> 1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?
    >>>> 2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?
    >>>> TIA
    >>>
    >>> Assuming: 1) NTFS file system, 2) Ample unused space on the drive,
    >>> and 3) Usage is within that of 90% of computer users, THEN the
    >>> appropriate time interval between defragmentation runs is measured
    >>> in decades. There is usually no compelling reason to defragment an NTFS
    >>> volume.

    >
    > You must be referring to computers that are used maybe twice per decade.
    > Otherwise you're an idiot and I hope you follow you own advice faithfully.
     
  16. Bill Sharpe

    Bill Sharpe Flightless Bird

    quset wrote:
    > I use my home PC (XP SP3) to burn CD’s and movies.
    > I start off by transferring 2-4 GB of data from USB drives to the HHD.
    > After the transfer, I run Disk clean and then Defrag. Often, Defrag shows
    > blocks of fragmented files. Sometimes I have to run Defrag multiple times in
    > order to clean them up before burning the CD's.
    >
    > I was speaking w/ a Dell tech rep yesterday about my new laptop (Windows 7
    > 64 bit) & he indicated that running Defrag too often may damage my system -
    > for W 7, he said to just run it every other month.
    >
    > I would appreciate your opinion as to whether this is correct?
    > 1) would such be the case for both XP and Windows 7?
    > 2) How often is OK for each of these respective OS?
    > TIA


    You certainly don't have to defrag before burning CD's.

    One approach is the run Windows Defrag and just analyze the disk.
    Windows will let you know how defragmented the disk is and whether or
    not a defrag is necessary. That "necessity" is just a Microsoft opinion,
    as far as I'm concerned.

    I use my XP machine daily and create,edit, move and delete a lot of
    files. I defrag about once a month, which is probably more often than
    needed. Every other month, as the Dell tech suggested, is probably fine
    but running defrag often should not damage your system.

    One caution is that defrag may run into problems if your hard disk is
    nearly full. Of course you may be susceptible to other problems
    eventually if this is the case.

    Bill
     
  17. HeyBub

    HeyBub Flightless Bird

    R. McCarty wrote:
    > Your conclusion doesn't meet with my "Real World" experience. I work
    > on computers all the time that have never been defragged. Sometimes
    > the total fragmentation level is in excess of 25-30%. These are
    > systems that have been running anywhere from 2 to 5 years. Because of
    > the extreme fragmentation some file fragments may exist all the way
    > to the last portion of clusters on the volume.
    > Doing a full defrag on those machines can take hours to complete. If
    > they had been defragged on almost any schedule the performance of the
    > PC would not have degraded as much as they had when they came in for
    > servicing.
    > I really wish people would not try to convince others that NTFS
    > volumes do not need defragmenting. The only case in which that might be
    > true
    > is if the physical drive itself is an SSD.
    >


    From where do these computers come on which you work?

    It's unlikely they are from a home user and more likely they are found in a
    corporate environment where the employees spend the preponderance of their
    day downloading either naughty movies or funny cat pictures.

    And how do you measure the improved efficiency after defragmentation?
     
  18. HeyBub

    HeyBub Flightless Bird

    Unknown wrote:
    > How can you make such a ridiculous statement?


    Good question. Here's one technical explaination:

    "It is already clear that NTFS is a system which is predisposed to
    fragmentation inspite of official statements. But it doesn't suffer from it.
    All internal structures are constructed in such way that fragmentation does
    not hinder to find data fragments fast. But it doesn't save from the
    physical effect of fragmentation - waste disk heads motions."
     
  19. R. McCarty

    R. McCarty Flightless Bird

    Most all the computers I referenced are home computers. Most if not
    all running XP with a very few using Windows Vista. Most Corporate
    or small business machines are pre-configured to handle defrag as a
    part of the Server policies.

    There are several tools for quantifying how fragmentation affects the
    system performance. One common thing on the XP machines is when
    users purposely delete the contents of \Prefetch. Once layout.ini
    is rebuilt and the ProcessIdleTasks is run you can easily see response
    times improve in both boot cycle time and application start up. Those
    are the direct result of file ( & Driver) placement and defrag.

    Raxco at one time had a tool that actually caused volume fragmentation
    so you could measure before and after results using Perfect Disk. I
    know that current releases of Perfect Disk and Diskeeper have charts
    that show the volume performance statistics based on fragmentation level.
    So you can visually see how much performance loss is occurring from
    the % of fragmentation.

    I recommend both Perfect Disk & Diskeeper ( fee based ) and a
    program called Defraggler ( Free ) for more comprehensive defrag than
    the built-in Windows defrag tool provides.

    "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:e1whMUunKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > R. McCarty wrote:
    >> Your conclusion doesn't meet with my "Real World" experience. I work
    >> on computers all the time that have never been defragged. Sometimes
    >> the total fragmentation level is in excess of 25-30%. These are
    >> systems that have been running anywhere from 2 to 5 years. Because of
    >> the extreme fragmentation some file fragments may exist all the way
    >> to the last portion of clusters on the volume.
    >> Doing a full defrag on those machines can take hours to complete. If
    >> they had been defragged on almost any schedule the performance of the
    >> PC would not have degraded as much as they had when they came in for
    >> servicing.
    >> I really wish people would not try to convince others that NTFS
    >> volumes do not need defragmenting. The only case in which that might be
    >> true
    >> is if the physical drive itself is an SSD.
    >>

    >
    > From where do these computers come on which you work?
    >
    > It's unlikely they are from a home user and more likely they are found in
    > a corporate environment where the employees spend the preponderance of
    > their day downloading either naughty movies or funny cat pictures.
    >
    > And how do you measure the improved efficiency after defragmentation?
    >
     
  20. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    In line response----
    "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:eNQKJcunKHA.5696@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Unknown wrote:
    >> How can you make such a ridiculous statement?

    >
    > Good question. Here's one technical explaination:
    >
    > "It is already clear that NTFS is a system which is predisposed to
    > fragmentation inspite of official statements. But it doesn't suffer from
    > it.


    > All internal structures are constructed in such way that fragmentation
    > does not hinder to find data fragments fast.

    Ambiguous at best. What if there are hundreds of fragments? What if each
    fragment requires 10 MS of seek time?

    > But it doesn't save from the physical effect of fragmentation - waste disk
    > heads motions."
    >

    Defragging CAN save a lot of time and the effects are a faster running
    computer.
     

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