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Friday, January 27, 2023

Apple March 8, 2022 Event

Apple announced several products during their March 8, 2022, event. Studio Display Mac Studio iPad air iPhone SE iPhone 13 and 13 Pro color addition Some of the products will...

Eastman files motion for exculpatory information and continuance

In response to the January 6 Select Committee Brief to Eastman Privilege Assertions, Eastman has filed a new motion with the court. A request for the court to require...

February 2022 Employment Report

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today that total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 678,000. The unemployment rate edged down to 3.8 percent The employment number exceeded forecasts The...

Brain Anticipates the Future to ‘See’ the Present

Scientists argue that the brain has evolved to see a split second into the future when it perceives motion. Because it takes the brain at least a tenth of a second to model visual information, it is working with old information. By modeling the future during movement, it is seeing the present.

In an experiment originated by Dr. Nijhawan, people watch an object pass a flashbulb. The timing is exact: the bulb flashes precisely as the object passes. But people perceive that the object has moved past the bulb before it flashes.

I wonder if anyone has anyone considered implications this principle has for learning? Do some learners use this principle to learn faster then others?

Source: Mind – Optical Illusions Show How Brain Anticipates the Future to ‘See’ the Present – NYTimes.com

Thanks, Kurzweil, for the link.

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