Origami Shown on CNBC Business News

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Did you see the Origami ultra mobile Tablet PCs shown this morning on CNBC? A business reporter on the Business News program showed it at the Intel Developers Conference.

The Origami unit has a dark case; couldn’t tell if it was black or another dark color.

The reporter called the unit an Origami. He emphasized the small size of the unit by removing it from his inside coat pocket.

He did not mention developer, manufacturer, brand, designer, promoter, etc. other than it is being shown at IDC.

The reporter did not once mention that the Origami unit uses digital ink. Instead, he and the studio talking head discussed possible ways to attach a keyboard to it. “I just like to type everything,” she said.

Hmmm.

And then he removed and showed a smaller unit that looked like an OQO. He didn’t name the unit. He liked it better than the Origami, because it had a keyboard attached to the unit.

Double hmmm.

The studio person asked if these units are now available. He said “no,” but probably soon, or they would not be shown at IDC.

Triple hmmm.

Somebody responsible for these units messed up big time by not providing the reporter with information about the unique functions of these two ultra mobile Tablet PCs.

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Robert Heiny
Robert W. Heiny, Ph.D. is a retired professor, social scientist, and business partner with previous academic appointments as a public school classroom teacher, senior faculty, or senior research member, and administrator. Appointments included at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Peabody College and the Kennedy Center now of Vanderbilt University; and Brandeis University. Dr. Heiny also served as Director of the Montana Center on Disabilities. His peer reviewed contributions to education include publication in [I]The Encyclopedia of Education [/I](1971), and in professional journals and conferences. He served s an expert reviewer of proposals to USOE, and on a team that wrote plans for 12 state-wide and multistate special education and preschools programs. He currently writes user guides for educators and learners as well as columns for [I]TuxReports[/I].com.

1 COMMENT

  1. The reporter did not once mention that the Origami unit uses digital ink. Instead, he and the studio talking head discussed possible ways to attach a keyboard to it. “I just like to type everything,” she said.D’OH!