Technology in the Classroom: Fad or Foundation for Learning?

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Linda Strean of GreatSchools.net Staff reviews uses of electronic technologies in classrooms. She provides a useful overview of points for parents to consider.

Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent getting computers into classrooms, and teachers and students around the country are using technology in new ways. That raises two important questions for parents:

How is technology being used to improve learning?

Are students developing the skills they’ll need to understand and use it in the future?

I especially appreciate her comments about how parents should expect to see educators using technologies in inspired ways. Some may also find interest in the article by Marian Wilde that asks if your child is old enough for a cell phone.

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Robert Heiny
Robert W. Heiny, Ph.D. is a retired professor, social scientist, and business partner with previous academic appointments as a public school classroom teacher, senior faculty, or senior research member, and administrator. Appointments included at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Peabody College and the Kennedy Center now of Vanderbilt University; and Brandeis University. Dr. Heiny also served as Director of the Montana Center on Disabilities. His peer reviewed contributions to education include publication in [I]The Encyclopedia of Education [/I](1971), and in professional journals and conferences. He served s an expert reviewer of proposals to USOE, and on a team that wrote plans for 12 state-wide and multistate special education and preschools programs. He currently writes user guides for educators and learners as well as columns for [I]TuxReports[/I].com.

1 COMMENT

  1. I wrote on this topic only related to higher education. In order to the technology to be worth it we must look at how it can improve the teaching and learning process rather than be a paper substitute. Check out Talku.org