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WinXP Pro Version

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Kernel, Sep 5, 2010.

  1. Kernel

    Kernel Flightless Bird

    I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM or a
    retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution. I'd like to
    install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is kaput, then later
    trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm building...but obviously I
    wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM version. The CD it replaced was not
    an OEM, but a retail XP.
     
  2. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    Kernel wrote:

    > I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    > replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM or a
    > retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution. I'd like to
    > install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is kaput, then later
    > trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm building...but obviously I
    > wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM version. The CD it replaced was not
    > an OEM, but a retail XP.


    You sure it says "Not For Retail". The NFR versions that I've seen are
    "Not For Resale". So just how did you "receive" this install CD? Did
    you buy it? If so, the seller sold you an illegitimate copy.

    NFR = Not For Resale
    The original purchaser is NOT allowed to resale the product. Typically
    it is a promotional product distributed to a limited set of customers.

    If it indeed says "Not For Retail or OEM Distribution" then that install
    CD is to use with whatever license you already have and for which you
    needed a replacement CD. You got a *replacement* install CD for the
    license you already possess. You never bothered to mention just what
    license type you had previously so we can't tell you how you can use
    this replacement CD. You got a replacement CD, not a new license. So
    what license did you have before and still have now for which this
    replacement CD is associated?
     
  3. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    They are not going to give you an "OEM" installation cd unless you
    specifically asked for one and quoted for them the exact machine / model
    number of the PC it was intended for use on.

    If the defective cd it was intended to replace was a plain retail version,
    then that is what they will have replaced it with.

    OEM disks are generally only obtainable through the PC manufacturer that
    supplied your PC.

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)




    "Kernel" <kerneldebugger@cxo.net> wrote in message
    news:i60sr8$gf8$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    > replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM or a
    > retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution. I'd like to
    > install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is kaput, then later
    > trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm building...but obviously I
    > wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM version. The CD it replaced was
    > not an OEM, but a retail XP.
    >
     
  4. Kernel

    Kernel Flightless Bird

    "Tim Meddick" <timmeddick@o2.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:egBQ5MVTLHA.3792@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > They are not going to give you an "OEM" installation cd unless you
    > specifically asked for one and quoted for them the exact machine / model
    > number of the PC it was intended for use on.
    >
    > If the defective cd it was intended to replace was a plain retail version,
    > then that is what they will have replaced it with.
    >
    > OEM disks are generally only obtainable through the PC manufacturer that
    > supplied your PC.
    >
    > ==
    >
    > Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Kernel" <kerneldebugger@cxo.net> wrote in message
    > news:i60sr8$gf8$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >> I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    >> replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM or a
    >> retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution. I'd like to
    >> install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is kaput, then later
    >> trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm building...but obviously I
    >> wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM version. The CD it replaced was
    >> not an OEM, but a retail XP.
    >>

    >

    I purchased a WinXP Pro from Viosoftware, it would not install
    because some of the files were defective, and it named them.
    There was a small scratch on the CD, so I buffed it out. It still would
    not install although there were fewer defective files noted when I
    tried to install it. I contacted Microsoft and they sent a replacement
    with a new product code (YIPEE). So back to my question, is this
    replacement CD an OEM or a retail version??????

    FYI, I also purchased a WinXP Pro OEM on ebay, it installed and activated.
    But
    when I went to the Microsoft update site and installed WGA, it went crazy,
    THIS CD IS NOT A GENUINE CD, IT IS A FRAUDULENT... That site
    then gave me instructions to send it to Microsoft with the date of purchase,
    place of purchase, receipt, etc. They said if it's a copy with the
    Microsoft
    holgram they would replace it. They did! This is not the CD I'm referring
    to
    in my post...this one says it is OEM!
     
  5. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    If the disk it was replacing was not an OEM disk then nor will it's
    replacement be OEM.

    OEM disks are always provided through the PC manufacturer - Microsoft don't
    give out OEM disks.

    OEM disks always have the name of the PC manufacturer written on them (e.g.
    Dell, Compaq, etc., ).

    OEM stands for "Original Equipment Manufacturer" so, obviously, must be
    obtained through the PC manufacturer and not direct from Microsoft.

    If it were an OEM disk, Microsoft would inform you it was such and refer
    you back to the PC manufacturer, whose responsibility it would be to
    provide effective "backup" installation CDs in working order.

    Like I said, an OEM disk is linked to a specific manufacturer and model of
    PC - it will not install properly on a PC of another make / model without
    having to be specifically activated, usually involving a special phone call
    to Microsoft - and if there're not convinced you have paid for the disk, or
    otherwise have a right to use it on the PC you are trying to install it
    on - they won't allow it's activation.

    Incidentally, the practice of providing backup OEM installaation disks with
    a new PC, is decreasing, as nowadays, PC manufacturers prefer the inclusion
    of a hidden partition on which is kept a restoration image of the operating
    system as it left the factory.

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)




    "Kernel" <kerneldebugger@cxo.net> wrote in message
    news:i61b39$1c6$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >
    > "Tim Meddick" <timmeddick@o2.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:egBQ5MVTLHA.3792@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    >> They are not going to give you an "OEM" installation cd unless you
    >> specifically asked for one and quoted for them the exact machine / model
    >> number of the PC it was intended for use on.
    >>
    >> If the defective cd it was intended to replace was a plain retail
    >> version, then that is what they will have replaced it with.
    >>
    >> OEM disks are generally only obtainable through the PC manufacturer that
    >> supplied your PC.
    >>
    >> ==
    >>
    >> Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Kernel" <kerneldebugger@cxo.net> wrote in message
    >> news:i60sr8$gf8$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>> I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    >>> replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM or
    >>> a retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution. I'd
    >>> like to install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is kaput,
    >>> then later trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm building...but
    >>> obviously I wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM version. The CD it
    >>> replaced was not an OEM, but a retail XP.
    >>>

    >>

    > I purchased a WinXP Pro from Viosoftware, it would not install
    > because some of the files were defective, and it named them.
    > There was a small scratch on the CD, so I buffed it out. It still would
    > not install although there were fewer defective files noted when I
    > tried to install it. I contacted Microsoft and they sent a replacement
    > with a new product code (YIPEE). So back to my question, is this
    > replacement CD an OEM or a retail version??????
    >
    > FYI, I also purchased a WinXP Pro OEM on ebay, it installed and
    > activated. But
    > when I went to the Microsoft update site and installed WGA, it went
    > crazy,
    > THIS CD IS NOT A GENUINE CD, IT IS A FRAUDULENT... That site
    > then gave me instructions to send it to Microsoft with the date of
    > purchase,
    > place of purchase, receipt, etc. They said if it's a copy with the
    > Microsoft
    > holgram they would replace it. They did! This is not the CD I'm
    > referring to
    > in my post...this one says it is OEM!
    >
    >
    >
     
  6. Kernel

    Kernel Flightless Bird

    Read my lips...I purchased an Win XP Pro OEM CD through ebay. It installed
    and activated just fine. When I went to update it, what happened was a
    thing to behold...everything but bells and sirens. The site then said if
    the CD has the full MS hologram, and if you send it along with the receipt,
    where you bought it, and from whom you bought it, and it was determined to
    be a counterfeit CD, MS would replace it free of charge. I did, and they
    did. They replaced it with an OEM CD. Obviously it doesn't say Dell, or
    HP, because it came from Microsoft. I found their service to be superb, and
    I suspect the seller is not now so fond of MS, eh?


    "Tim Meddick" <timmeddick@o2.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:%23kqBo2VTLHA.620@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > If the disk it was replacing was not an OEM disk then nor will it's
    > replacement be OEM.
    >
    > OEM disks are always provided through the PC manufacturer - Microsoft
    > don't give out OEM disks.
    >
    > OEM disks always have the name of the PC manufacturer written on them
    > (e.g. Dell, Compaq, etc., ).
    >
    > OEM stands for "Original Equipment Manufacturer" so, obviously, must be
    > obtained through the PC manufacturer and not direct from Microsoft.
    >
    > If it were an OEM disk, Microsoft would inform you it was such and refer
    > you back to the PC manufacturer, whose responsibility it would be to
    > provide effective "backup" installation CDs in working order.
    >
    > Like I said, an OEM disk is linked to a specific manufacturer and model of
    > PC - it will not install properly on a PC of another make / model without
    > having to be specifically activated, usually involving a special phone
    > call to Microsoft - and if there're not convinced you have paid for the
    > disk, or otherwise have a right to use it on the PC you are trying to
    > install it on - they won't allow it's activation.
    >
    > Incidentally, the practice of providing backup OEM installaation disks
    > with a new PC, is decreasing, as nowadays, PC manufacturers prefer the
    > inclusion of a hidden partition on which is kept a restoration image of
    > the operating system as it left the factory.
    >
    > ==
    >
    > Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Kernel" <kerneldebugger@cxo.net> wrote in message
    > news:i61b39$1c6$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>
    >> "Tim Meddick" <timmeddick@o2.co.uk> wrote in message
    >> news:egBQ5MVTLHA.3792@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    >>> They are not going to give you an "OEM" installation cd unless you
    >>> specifically asked for one and quoted for them the exact machine / model
    >>> number of the PC it was intended for use on.
    >>>
    >>> If the defective cd it was intended to replace was a plain retail
    >>> version, then that is what they will have replaced it with.
    >>>
    >>> OEM disks are generally only obtainable through the PC manufacturer that
    >>> supplied your PC.
    >>>
    >>> ==
    >>>
    >>> Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Kernel" <kerneldebugger@cxo.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:i60sr8$gf8$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>>> I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    >>>> replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM or
    >>>> a retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution. I'd
    >>>> like to install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is kaput,
    >>>> then later trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm building...but
    >>>> obviously I wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM version. The CD it
    >>>> replaced was not an OEM, but a retail XP.
    >>>>
    >>>

    >> I purchased a WinXP Pro from Viosoftware, it would not install
    >> because some of the files were defective, and it named them.
    >> There was a small scratch on the CD, so I buffed it out. It still would
    >> not install although there were fewer defective files noted when I
    >> tried to install it. I contacted Microsoft and they sent a replacement
    >> with a new product code (YIPEE). So back to my question, is this
    >> replacement CD an OEM or a retail version??????
    >>
    >> FYI, I also purchased a WinXP Pro OEM on ebay, it installed and
    >> activated. But
    >> when I went to the Microsoft update site and installed WGA, it went
    >> crazy,
    >> THIS CD IS NOT A GENUINE CD, IT IS A FRAUDULENT... That site
    >> then gave me instructions to send it to Microsoft with the date of
    >> purchase,
    >> place of purchase, receipt, etc. They said if it's a copy with the
    >> Microsoft
    >> holgram they would replace it. They did! This is not the CD I'm
    >> referring to
    >> in my post...this one says it is OEM!
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
     
  7. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Tim Meddick wrote:

    > OEM disks always have the name of the PC manufacturer written on them
    > (e.g. Dell, Compaq, etc., ).


    This is incorrect. Branded ones, yes. However, Microsoft does indeed
    manufacture generic OEM CDs.
     
  8. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    Your "read my lips" comment was base and insulting.

    You obviously have a problem yourself, "hearing" what others say...

    Microsoft do NOT give out OEM disks.

    They MIGHT replace a defective OEM disk with a retail copy - but it won't
    be OEM!

    What - you think they carry copies of all the thousands upon thousands of
    PC manufacturer's different customizations of disk from all the years gone
    by?

    One easy way to tell if the disk you are talking about is OEM - open
    Windows Explorer and browse the cd for a folder with the same name as a PC
    manufacturer.

    Or look for filenames like :

    OEMLOGO.*
    OEMINFO.*

    The original equipment manufacturer's name will be somewhere on the disk
    for sure - *if* it's an OEM disk....

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)




    "Kernel" <kerneldebugger@cxo.net> wrote in message
    news:i61f2u$djg$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > Read my lips...I purchased an Win XP Pro OEM CD through ebay. It
    > installed and activated just fine. When I went to update it, what
    > happened was a thing to behold...everything but bells and sirens. The
    > site then said if the CD has the full MS hologram, and if you send it
    > along with the receipt, where you bought it, and from whom you bought it,
    > and it was determined to be a counterfeit CD, MS would replace it free of
    > charge. I did, and they did. They replaced it with an OEM CD.
    > Obviously it doesn't say Dell, or HP, because it came from Microsoft. I
    > found their service to be superb, and I suspect the seller is not now so
    > fond of MS, eh?
    >
    >
    > "Tim Meddick" <timmeddick@o2.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:%23kqBo2VTLHA.620@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    >> If the disk it was replacing was not an OEM disk then nor will it's
    >> replacement be OEM.
    >>
    >> OEM disks are always provided through the PC manufacturer - Microsoft
    >> don't give out OEM disks.
    >>
    >> OEM disks always have the name of the PC manufacturer written on them
    >> (e.g. Dell, Compaq, etc., ).
    >>
    >> OEM stands for "Original Equipment Manufacturer" so, obviously, must be
    >> obtained through the PC manufacturer and not direct from Microsoft.
    >>
    >> If it were an OEM disk, Microsoft would inform you it was such and refer
    >> you back to the PC manufacturer, whose responsibility it would be to
    >> provide effective "backup" installation CDs in working order.
    >>
    >> Like I said, an OEM disk is linked to a specific manufacturer and model
    >> of PC - it will not install properly on a PC of another make / model
    >> without having to be specifically activated, usually involving a special
    >> phone call to Microsoft - and if there're not convinced you have paid
    >> for the disk, or otherwise have a right to use it on the PC you are
    >> trying to install it on - they won't allow it's activation.
    >>
    >> Incidentally, the practice of providing backup OEM installaation disks
    >> with a new PC, is decreasing, as nowadays, PC manufacturers prefer the
    >> inclusion of a hidden partition on which is kept a restoration image of
    >> the operating system as it left the factory.
    >>
    >> ==
    >>
    >> Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Kernel" <kerneldebugger@cxo.net> wrote in message
    >> news:i61b39$1c6$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>>
    >>> "Tim Meddick" <timmeddick@o2.co.uk> wrote in message
    >>> news:egBQ5MVTLHA.3792@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    >>>> They are not going to give you an "OEM" installation cd unless you
    >>>> specifically asked for one and quoted for them the exact machine /
    >>>> model number of the PC it was intended for use on.
    >>>>
    >>>> If the defective cd it was intended to replace was a plain retail
    >>>> version, then that is what they will have replaced it with.
    >>>>
    >>>> OEM disks are generally only obtainable through the PC manufacturer
    >>>> that supplied your PC.
    >>>>
    >>>> ==
    >>>>
    >>>> Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Kernel" <kerneldebugger@cxo.net> wrote in message
    >>>> news:i60sr8$gf8$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>>>> I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    >>>>> replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM
    >>>>> or a retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution.
    >>>>> I'd like to install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is
    >>>>> kaput, then later trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm
    >>>>> building...but obviously I wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM
    >>>>> version. The CD it replaced was not an OEM, but a retail XP.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>> I purchased a WinXP Pro from Viosoftware, it would not install
    >>> because some of the files were defective, and it named them.
    >>> There was a small scratch on the CD, so I buffed it out. It still
    >>> would
    >>> not install although there were fewer defective files noted when I
    >>> tried to install it. I contacted Microsoft and they sent a replacement
    >>> with a new product code (YIPEE). So back to my question, is this
    >>> replacement CD an OEM or a retail version??????
    >>>
    >>> FYI, I also purchased a WinXP Pro OEM on ebay, it installed and
    >>> activated. But
    >>> when I went to the Microsoft update site and installed WGA, it went
    >>> crazy,
    >>> THIS CD IS NOT A GENUINE CD, IT IS A FRAUDULENT... That site
    >>> then gave me instructions to send it to Microsoft with the date of
    >>> purchase,
    >>> place of purchase, receipt, etc. They said if it's a copy with the
    >>> Microsoft
    >>> holgram they would replace it. They did! This is not the CD I'm
    >>> referring to
    >>> in my post...this one says it is OEM!
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>

    >
    >
     
  9. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Kernel wrote:
    > I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    > replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM
    > or a retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution. I'd
    > like to install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is
    > kaput, then later trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm
    > building...but obviously I wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM
    > version. The CD it replaced was not an OEM, but a retail XP.


    You need to ask Microsoft what they sent you.

    Did they send you an actual COA? If so, the license type should be on
    there.

    Even assuming it is a Retail license, what do you hope to gain by
    temporarily installing it on an old PC that is kaput (out of curiosity)?
    Is the one you are building intended to replace your daughter's old one?
     
  10. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Tim Meddick wrote:
    > Your "read my lips" comment was base and insulting.
    >
    > You obviously have a problem yourself, "hearing" what others say...
    >
    > Microsoft do NOT give out OEM disks.
    >


    This is an example of what Microsoft sells to system builders.
    I bought one of these, to install WinXP SP3 on this computer.

    "Microsoft Windows XP Home SP3 for System Builders - OEM"

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116511

    It is OEM, because it is intended to be used on only one PC,
    and not transferred from PC to PC. It is available for
    less money than the ones marked "retail". It isn't a "branded" or
    "royalty" OEM disc, such as you'd get with a Dell or HP. It
    is intended for someone who builds PCs at home, to install
    an OEM version to the system they build and sell to someone else.

    I built my own computer, but did not sell the resulting
    built-up system to anyone. I've still using it.

    Paul
     
  11. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    Tim Meddick wrote:

    > OEM disks are always provided through the PC manufacturer - Microsoft don't
    > give out OEM disks.
    >
    > OEM disks always have the name of the PC manufacturer written on them (e.g.
    > Dell, Compaq, etc., ).
    >
    > OEM stands for "Original Equipment Manufacturer" so, obviously, must be
    > obtained through the PC manufacturer and not direct from Microsoft.


    Wrong. In the past, you could buy Microsoft-sourced OEM versions (the
    image came from MS, not composed by the PC maker) for Windows XP. These
    were the same setup (with nothing special for any brand PC) as the
    retail versions but would only perform a full install. So there were
    generic (MS-sourced) OEM versions that were never associated to any PC
    manufacturer, and then there were the OEM licenses distributed by PC
    makers who had the licenses but had to produce the media themselves (and
    why you see their brand name on the CD along with differentiation in the
    setup process and the file set on the CD).

    For Vista, they generic OEM licenses were renamed to "System Builder"
    licenses. These are NOT doled out through PC makers (who buy just the
    licenses and have to produce themselves the image they stamp onto their
    branded CDs). There are still the name-branded OEM versions, too.

    The reason for renaming the generic OEM licenses to System Builder
    licenses was to make clear that they were generic OEM versions sold for
    use by jobbers who build their own hosts, and these aren't branded of
    OEM licenses, either. There was confusion between the old generic
    (MS-sourced) OEM versions and the branded OEM versions (from PC makers).
    So, for Vista, they called the generic OEM versions as System Builder
    OEM licenses. Back for XP, OEM could've meant generic or branded. For
    Vista, it's System Builder or branded for OEM versions.

    OEM applied to whomever was the entity that did the install. That could
    be a PC maker. It can also be YOU. You can be the OEM. MS was hoping
    to eliminate some of that confusion by adding System Builder OEM to the
    generic versions. I'd have to go digging (if the web pages even exist
    anymore) to find out the reseller qualifications for redistributing
    MS-sourced images for OEM version but it was there before. You could
    get legitimate generic OEM versions that was Microsoft's image and not
    tainted or touched by any PC maker.
     
  12. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    The rare example you quoted, is not what most would think of as an OEM
    disk.

    Here, OEM means anyone building a custom PC and not a "true" manufacturer
    as in: Original Equipment Manufacturer.

    A true OEM disk is tied to a particular make / model of PC, and if used on
    a PC other than that it was intended for use on, would require activation.

    This would not be true for the disk you quoted in your last post.

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)




    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:i61hhj$jao$1@speranza.aioe.org...
    > Tim Meddick wrote:
    >> Your "read my lips" comment was base and insulting.
    >>
    >> You obviously have a problem yourself, "hearing" what others say...
    >>
    >> Microsoft do NOT give out OEM disks.
    >>

    >
    > This is an example of what Microsoft sells to system builders.
    > I bought one of these, to install WinXP SP3 on this computer.
    >
    > "Microsoft Windows XP Home SP3 for System Builders - OEM"
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116511
    >
    > It is OEM, because it is intended to be used on only one PC,
    > and not transferred from PC to PC. It is available for
    > less money than the ones marked "retail". It isn't a "branded" or
    > "royalty" OEM disc, such as you'd get with a Dell or HP. It
    > is intended for someone who builds PCs at home, to install
    > an OEM version to the system they build and sell to someone else.
    >
    > I built my own computer, but did not sell the resulting
    > built-up system to anyone. I've still using it.
    >
    > Paul
     
  13. Kernel

    Kernel Flightless Bird

    Yes, they sent an actual COA. The license type is not on the COA.

    "Daave" <daave@example.com> wrote in message
    news:uMBMDTWTLHA.5944@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > Kernel wrote:
    >> I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    >> replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM
    >> or a retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution. I'd
    >> like to install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is
    >> kaput, then later trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm
    >> building...but obviously I wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM
    >> version. The CD it replaced was not an OEM, but a retail XP.

    >
    > You need to ask Microsoft what they sent you.
    >
    > Did they send you an actual COA? If so, the license type should be on
    > there.
    >
    > Even assuming it is a Retail license, what do you hope to gain by
    > temporarily installing it on an old PC that is kaput (out of curiosity)?
    > Is the one you are building intended to replace your daughter's old one?
    >
     
  14. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    Kernel wrote:

    > Read my lips...I purchased an Win XP Pro OEM CD through ebay. It installed
    > and activated just fine. When I went to update it, what happened was a
    > thing to behold...everything but bells and sirens. The site then said if
    > the CD has the full MS hologram, and if you send it along with the receipt,
    > where you bought it, and from whom you bought it, and it was determined to
    > be a counterfeit CD, MS would replace it free of charge. I did, and they
    > did. They replaced it with an OEM CD. Obviously it doesn't say Dell, or
    > HP, because it came from Microsoft. I found their service to be superb, and
    > I suspect the seller is not now so fond of MS, eh?


    You never specified what you bought from *Viosoftware*, only some OTHER
    copy you got from eBay (uffda!). So, as yet, you have NOT clarified
    just what type of license you got for the copy you bought from
    VioSoftware.

    Don't even know why you bothered mentioning the copy from VioSoftware
    since that wasn't the copy that you got MS to replace. First you said
    you got the Windows XP CD from VioSoftware. You now say that it was a
    copy from eBay that you got replaced. Unfortunately for you, we can see
    you moving the mirrors and lighting the smoke bombs trying to obfuscate
    just what is going on. According to your story as it has unfolded so
    far, you have /TWO/ copies of Windows XP Pro: one you bought from
    VioSoftware and another you bought from eBay. Microsoft sent you only
    ONE replacement for the copy you got from eBay. You have yet to get a
    replacement for the bad CD you got from VioSoftware. So you now have:
    (1) A bad CD for the copy from VioSoftware (which was never mentioned if
    retail or OEM version) and still have no replacement for it so you
    cannot use that license; and, (2) A pirated OEM copy from eBay that you
    paid Microsoft to send you a legit license and install CD but which is
    still an OEM version.

    See my other reply (to Tim) which explains why there *do* exist generic
    Microsoft-sourced imaged versions of OEM discs. It was possible to get
    MS-sourced OEM discs. Microsoft produced them and resellers or
    distributors licensed by Microsoft could then sell them. That was the
    only type of OEM disc that I ever would buy when I was building my PCs.
    I wouldn't touch the branded OEM discs.

    So now, in your reply this time, it appears the replacement CD had
    nothing to do with the copy of Windows XP Pro that you got from
    VioSoftware. Now it appears you are talking about a replacement CD for
    a PIRATED copy you got from eBay and which was for an OEM version.
    Since you paid to get a legitimate CD and product code for a bad OEM
    version, the replacement is for that OEM license. So what you got from
    MS was a CD that is to be used with the OEM license that you originally
    you thought that you bought (and obviously never paid for the retail
    version to include support; 2 incidents, as I recall).

    You got a pirated OEM copy from eBay. Microsoft charged you to replace
    the pirated version with a legit version. So what you have is an OEM
    version to replace the pirated OEM version.

    If you already installed that pirated OEM version, that is the same host
    where you now get to use the replacement OEM version. The license
    sticks to the first host on which the OEM version is installed. If, as
    you say in your first post, that you intend to install this OEM version
    on your daughter's old PC then that is the host to which the OEM license
    gets stuck *permanently*. When you trash the daughter's old PC, you'll
    also trash the OEM license and lose that copy of Windows.

    OEM licenses stick to the first host on which they are installed.
    Whether that host gets stolen, trashed, burned up in a fire, lost in a
    divorce settlement, a UFO levitates it away, or for whatever cause the
    host is lost or becomes unusable to you, the OEM license still remains
    tied to THAT hardware. The condition of that first-and-only-install
    host does not obviate the conditions of the OEM license. So be very
    careful as to which is the first host on which you install an OEM
    version because that's to where the OEM license gets stuck for eternity
    (well, legally that is per the contract to which you agreed by
    installing and using the software).

    If the VioSoftware copy is also an OEM version, you can use the OEM
    version that you got from Microsoft. That is, you can use the same MS
    generic OEM version where you install the licenses for the VioSoftware
    OEM copy and for the MS generic OEM copy; however, you use the
    VioSoftware OEM product key for that install and the MS generic OEM
    product key for that install. You can legally reuse the same OEM copy
    for many installs as along as you manage their licenses separately by
    using the product key for each one on one host. We do that regularly in
    our alpha lab by buying a set of licenses and using the same OEM image
    for each install but make sure a different product key (hence its
    license) on each host. Whether you buy 10 MS generic OEM CDs each with
    a product key or leave 9 of them sit on the shelf and use just 1 of them
    to do 10 installs but each has a different product key makes no logical
    or legal difference.

    The problem that crops up when using a MS-sourced image OEM disc is that
    it won't have any brand-specific drivers. You never mentioned just what
    you got from VioSoftware. I'm guessing that it was also a generic OEM
    license. So, perhaps, you have 2 generic OEM licenses, 2 product keys,
    but just 1 legitimate OEM disc. That means you can install twice on
    different hosts using the same OEM disc provided you use the 2 product
    keys on 2 different hosts. Once installed, you can't move that instance
    of Windows to another host. The OEM license (the image you lay down for
    the install and its product key) stick to the first host on which it is
    installed. So decide right now if you want to waste an OEM license on a
    PC that you intend to trash. When you trash that PC, you also trash the
    OEM license with it.

    If you had a retail version of Windows XP, the only limitation is that
    it be installed on only PC at a time (actually the EULA just says it
    must be running on only one PC at a time). So you can uninstall a
    retail version and move it to a new host. Can't do that with an OEM
    version.
     
  15. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    Kernel wrote:

    > Daave wrote ...
    >
    >> You need to ask Microsoft what they sent you.
    >>
    >> Did they send you an actual COA? If so, the license type should be on
    >> there.

    >
    > Yes, they sent an actual COA. The license type is not on the COA.


    As I recall, if it was an MS-sourced (their image) generic (non-branded)
    OEM version then you saw "OEM" somewhere on the COA sticker. After you
    do the install and enter the product KEY, you would see "OEM" in the
    product CODE (Control Panel -> System Properties -> General tab).

    How much did you pay Microsoft to replace the pirated copy you got from
    eBay? As I recall, the price that Microsoft charged to dole out a legit
    copy (in exchange for a pirated retail or OEM copy) was maybe $10 less
    than buying a legit OEM version from an online store (you didn't save
    much with Microsoft's exchange program and might do as well or better
    getting a whole 'nother legit OEM copy). Difficult to follow your
    changing story. I can't tell if Microsoft send you replacement
    installation media for the legitimate VioSoftware copy (which was never
    mentioned if retail or OEM) or you got them to dole out a legit copy for
    the pirated one you got from eBay. Replacements for defective media
    probably costs around $20 but the pirate replacement was close to full
    retail cost of the OEM version.

    You mention the bells and sirens after installing the eBay copy of
    Windows XP and couldn't do upgrades. So it sure sounds like you got
    Microsoft to exchange a legit copy for a pirated copy from eBay. From
    the pictures at:

    http://www.microsoft.com/howtotell/content.aspx?displaylang=en&pg=coa

    You should see "OEM" on the COA sticker if what you got from MS was an
    OEM version. If you are still unsure (by the absense of "OEM" that it
    is a retail version) then you could probably used the same contact venue
    that you used before to submit the pirated exhibit to Microsoft for
    exchange.


    For the VioSoftware copy (the disc you cannot read), was it a:
    - Retail version? <---.___ You never mentioned its license type
    - Or OEM version? <---'

    For the eBay copy (the pirated version that caused all the bells and
    sirens on upgrade), was it a:
    - Retail version?
    - Or OEM version? <--- Looks like it was this license type

    Microsoft's replacement disc was to replace WHICH copy:
    - Replaces the VioSoftware disc?
    - Replaces the eBay disc? <--- Looks like you replaced this one

    How much did Microsoft charge you for the replacement?

    See "OEM" anywhere on the COA sticker? If not, it's a retail version.

    Did you ever visit the following web page to validate your install of
    Windows (from eBay since it appears your issue was with a pirated copy
    since you couldn't even read the VioSoftware copy)?

    http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/default.aspx?displaylang=en

    If that (or the validation program in Windows) detects a pirated copy,
    it leads you to where you request to buy a legit copy from Microsoft. I
    don't have a pirated copy to see just where they lead you. Maybe they
    dump you to:

    http://support.microsoft.com/contactus/cu_sc_genadv_master?ws=support&ws=mscom#tab4

    In any case, you might be able to call them to find out what Microsoft
    sent to you.
     
  16. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Sounds like a Retail license then. (I have a generic OEM XP Home COA,
    and it says OEM on it.)

    BTW, VanguardLH's post is the one you should respond to; he is covering
    all the bases!

    FWIW, I agree with both VanguardLH and Tim. Your posts are very hard to
    follow (even when we are reading your lips). You keep adding new
    information and I'm still unclear. My guess is that twice Microsoft has
    replaced CDs. The first time it was for the (presumably) pirated one you
    purchased on Ebay. That was on OEM CD. The second was this time for the
    Retail CD you had originally purchased from Viosoftware. But it's only a
    guess. Really, Kernel, you have not been clear!


    Kernel wrote:
    > Yes, they sent an actual COA. The license type is not on the COA.
    >
    > "Daave" <daave@example.com> wrote in message
    > news:uMBMDTWTLHA.5944@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    >> Kernel wrote:
    >>> I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    >>> replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM
    >>> or a retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution. I'd
    >>> like to install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is
    >>> kaput, then later trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm
    >>> building...but obviously I wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM
    >>> version. The CD it replaced was not an OEM, but a retail XP.

    >>
    >> You need to ask Microsoft what they sent you.
    >>
    >> Did they send you an actual COA? If so, the license type should be on
    >> there.
    >>
    >> Even assuming it is a Retail license, what do you hope to gain by
    >> temporarily installing it on an old PC that is kaput (out of
    >> curiosity)? Is the one you are building intended to replace your
    >> daughter's old one?
     
  17. Anthony Buckland

    Anthony Buckland Flightless Bird

    "VanguardLH" <V@nguard.LH> wrote in message
    news:i6197c$tct$1@news.albasani.net...
    > Kernel wrote:
    >
    >> I've received an XP Pro installation CD from Microsoft Returns as a
    >> replacement for a defective CD, and I'd like to know if it's an OEM or a
    >> retail CD. The CD says Not For Retail or OEM Distribution. I'd like to
    >> install it temporarily on a daughter's old PC that is kaput, then later
    >> trash that PC and install it on a new one I'm building...but obviously I
    >> wouldn't want to do that if it's an OEM version. The CD it replaced was
    >> not
    >> an OEM, but a retail XP.

    >
    > You sure it says "Not For Retail". The NFR versions that I've seen are
    > "Not For Resale". So just how did you "receive" this install CD? Did
    > you buy it? If so, the seller sold you an illegitimate copy.
    >
    > NFR = Not For Resale
    > The original purchaser is NOT allowed to resale the product. Typically
    > it is a promotional product distributed to a limited set of customers.
    >
    > If it indeed says "Not For Retail or OEM Distribution" then that install
    > CD is to use with whatever license you already have and for which you
    > needed a replacement CD....



    As the King of Siam said, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.
    After reading through many of the other responses, I'd
    say, read Microsoft's lips, and install the damned thing,
    but only on the computer for which it was issued, not
    on another machine such as your daughter's miscellaneous
    computer.
     

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