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Windows Explorer can't delet long numerical files.

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by limeybiker, May 10, 2010.

  1. limeybiker

    limeybiker Flightless Bird

    I have three directories in the root directory named

    28e35e43bc9fba4052
    564c1198e199c4fdd6f513f8b1a5b5
    100145b6a635779a14

    How do I delete them.?

    All are 10mb, with update and support sub directories.

    I can't delete them, not even in safe mode.
    --


    Ride safe
    Barry
    <©¿©>
     
  2. WaIIy

    WaIIy Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 10 May 2010 13:13:47 -0400, "limeybiker" <abbl(nospam)@att.net>
    wrote:

    >
    >I have three directories in the root directory named
    >
    >28e35e43bc9fba4052
    >564c1198e199c4fdd6f513f8b1a5b5
    >100145b6a635779a14
    >
    >How do I delete them.?
    >
    >All are 10mb, with update and support sub directories.
    >
    >I can't delete them, not even in safe mode.


    Try -

    http://ccollomb.free.fr/unlocker/

    or maybe right click and check the file permissions
     
  3. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    limeybiker wrote:

    > I have three directories in the root directory named
    >
    > 28e35e43bc9fba4052
    > 564c1198e199c4fdd6f513f8b1a5b5
    > 100145b6a635779a14
    >
    > How do I delete them.?
    >
    > All are 10mb, with update and support sub directories.
    >
    > I can't delete them, not even in safe mode.


    Have you tried rebooting into Recovery Console mode or Safe Mode with
    Command Prompt to see if you can then delete them?

    Have you tried unloading explorer.exe (Windows Explorer) which is also used
    to display the desktop and might have a lock on those files? Open a command
    shell, open Task Manager, kill all instances of explore.exe (your desktop
    disappears), use the command shell to delete the files/folders, and then use
    File -> New Task to run a new instance of explore.exe (your desktop
    reappears).

    Unlocker is a handy utility to unlock a locked file or delete it on the next
    Windows startup (by using the PendingRename registry key that the OS checks
    on startup for renames or deletes).
    http://ccollomb.free.fr/unlocker/
     
  4. Tecknomage

    Tecknomage Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 10 May 2010 13:13:47 -0400, "limeybiker"
    <abbl(nospam)@att.net> wrote:

    >
    > I have three directories in the root directory named
    >
    > 28e35e43bc9fba4052
    > 564c1198e199c4fdd6f513f8b1a5b5
    > 100145b6a635779a14
    >
    > How do I delete them.?
    >
    > All are 10mb, with update and support sub directories.
    >
    > I can't delete them, not even in safe mode.


    !!! YOU SHOULD NOT !!!

    They are special system protected folders used by Windows or by
    another application. Deleting the MAY crash your system or
    application, or effect the ability to uninstall something.

    Look what is inside the folders. Right-click a filename, select
    Properties, and look at the version info to see where they came from.
    This will give you an idea on why the folder is there.

    By the way, the folder or file names like these are UIDs (Unique
    Identifiers) used in the Registry.


    --
    ======== Tecknomage ========
    Computer Systems Specialist
    IT Technician
    San Diego, CA
     
  5. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    Tecknomage wrote:

    > On Mon, 10 May 2010 13:13:47 -0400, "limeybiker"
    > <abbl(nospam)@att.net> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I have three directories in the root directory named
    >>
    >> 28e35e43bc9fba4052
    >> 564c1198e199c4fdd6f513f8b1a5b5
    >> 100145b6a635779a14
    >>
    >> How do I delete them.?
    >>
    >> All are 10mb, with update and support sub directories.
    >>
    >> I can't delete them, not even in safe mode.

    >
    > !!! YOU SHOULD NOT !!!
    >
    > They are special system protected folders used by Windows or by
    > another application. Deleting the MAY crash your system or
    > application, or effect the ability to uninstall something.
    >
    > Look what is inside the folders. Right-click a filename, select
    > Properties, and look at the version info to see where they came from.
    > This will give you an idea on why the folder is there.
    >
    > By the way, the folder or file names like these are UIDs (Unique
    > Identifiers) used in the Registry.


    Where did you come up with that gem? Folders named C:/<random> are
    temporary folders created by program installations. They are created either
    when files are extracted from a downloaded archive/compressed file or used
    during the install or after a reboot to continue the install. The install
    program should cleanup after itself by deleting these garbage folders but
    developers are often lazy to actually check for a cleanup after install.

    The folder names are rarely the class ID for the program. They are randomly
    generated and checked to make sure the folder doesn't already exist. This
    is merely to insure that there is a unique folder in which the install files
    get deposited. Often such programs will create a special-named subfolder
    under your %temp% folder but some programs have realized that users tend to
    cleanup their temp folder under their user profile and could interfere with
    completion of the installation.

    I have never seen any OS-dependent folders created with that naming scheme
    for Windows. I haven't seen it used (except during an installation) for any
    applications, either, but then I only use a few dozen apps and don't what
    the entire collection of software available might do when it installs.
     
  6. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    "Tecknomage" <tecknode@NOSPAM.com> wrote in message
    news:lieiu55fvar5b86di1nlrmjrjevcbjf4qr@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 10 May 2010 13:13:47 -0400, "limeybiker"
    > <abbl(nospam)@att.net> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I have three directories in the root directory named
    >>
    >> 28e35e43bc9fba4052
    >> 564c1198e199c4fdd6f513f8b1a5b5
    >> 100145b6a635779a14
    >>
    >> How do I delete them.?
    >>
    >> All are 10mb, with update and support sub directories.
    >>
    >> I can't delete them, not even in safe mode.

    >
    > !!! YOU SHOULD NOT !!!
    >
    > They are special system protected folders used by Windows or by
    > another application. Deleting the MAY crash your system or
    > application, or effect the ability to uninstall something.
    >
    > ======== Tecknomage ========
    > Computer Systems Specialist
    > IT Technician
    > San Diego, CA


    The OP can safely delete these files or folders. They were probably left
    behind by some update that did not run its full course or failed to clean up
    on completion. Have you ever seen a case with your own eyes where deleting
    such a folder caused a problem? Please post full details here, or else state
    an authoritative reference to a Microsoft web page that says what these
    folders are and why they must be preserved.
     
  7. limeybiker

    limeybiker Flightless Bird

    Many thanks worked like a charm.

    --


    Ride safe
    Barry
    <©¿©>



    "WaIIy" <WaIIy@(nft).invalid> wrote in message
    news:f4ggu519sk9lg1e80b8oo61p38d7tv73do@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 10 May 2010 13:13:47 -0400, "limeybiker" <abbl(nospam)@att.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>I have three directories in the root directory named
    >>
    >>28e35e43bc9fba4052
    >>564c1198e199c4fdd6f513f8b1a5b5
    >>100145b6a635779a14
    >>
    >>How do I delete them.?
    >>
    >>All are 10mb, with update and support sub directories.
    >>
    >>I can't delete them, not even in safe mode.

    >
    > Try -
    >
    > http://ccollomb.free.fr/unlocker/
    >
    > or maybe right click and check the file permissions
     
  8. limeybiker

    limeybiker Flightless Bird

    Well I used unlocker to delete them and sure enough it did, and the system
    hasn't died as someone predicted.

    Unfortunately I now have five files in the recycle bin that won't go away.

    --


    Ride safe
    Barry
    <©¿©>





    "limeybiker" <abbl(nospam)@att.net> wrote in message
    news:uxG2%23QG8KHA.644@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    >I have three directories in the root directory named
    >
    > 28e35e43bc9fba4052
    > 564c1198e199c4fdd6f513f8b1a5b5
    > 100145b6a635779a14
    >
    > How do I delete them.?
    >
    > All are 10mb, with update and support sub directories.
    >
    > I can't delete them, not even in safe mode.
    > --
    >
    >
    > Ride safe
    > Barry
    > <©¿©>
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  9. WaIIy

    WaIIy Flightless Bird

    On Tue, 11 May 2010 07:06:18 -0500, VanguardLH <V@nguard.LH> wrote:

    >Tecknomage wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 10 May 2010 13:13:47 -0400, "limeybiker"
    >> <abbl(nospam)@att.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> I have three directories in the root directory named
    >>>
    >>> 28e35e43bc9fba4052
    >>> 564c1198e199c4fdd6f513f8b1a5b5
    >>> 100145b6a635779a14
    >>>
    >>> How do I delete them.?
    >>>
    >>> All are 10mb, with update and support sub directories.
    >>>
    >>> I can't delete them, not even in safe mode.

    >>
    >> !!! YOU SHOULD NOT !!!
    >>
    >> They are special system protected folders used by Windows or by
    >> another application. Deleting the MAY crash your system or
    >> application, or effect the ability to uninstall something.
    >>
    >> Look what is inside the folders. Right-click a filename, select
    >> Properties, and look at the version info to see where they came from.
    >> This will give you an idea on why the folder is there.
    >>
    >> By the way, the folder or file names like these are UIDs (Unique
    >> Identifiers) used in the Registry.

    >
    >Where did you come up with that gem? Folders named C:/<random> are
    >temporary folders created by program installations. They are created either
    >when files are extracted from a downloaded archive/compressed file or used
    >during the install or after a reboot to continue the install. The install
    >program should cleanup after itself by deleting these garbage folders but
    >developers are often lazy to actually check for a cleanup after install.
    >
    >The folder names are rarely the class ID for the program. They are randomly
    >generated and checked to make sure the folder doesn't already exist. This
    >is merely to insure that there is a unique folder in which the install files
    >get deposited. Often such programs will create a special-named subfolder
    >under your %temp% folder but some programs have realized that users tend to
    >cleanup their temp folder under their user profile and could interfere with
    >completion of the installation.
    >
    >I have never seen any OS-dependent folders created with that naming scheme
    >for Windows. I haven't seen it used (except during an installation) for any
    >applications, either, but then I only use a few dozen apps and don't what
    >the entire collection of software available might do when it installs.


    Thanks for this explanation. I've had a few of these crazily named
    folders and wondered if I could get rid of them.

    One was from my Zune install. Geez, you'd think Microsoft would get rid
    of the temp folders during installation.
     
  10. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    Restore them, then press Shift+Del to delete them without sending them to
    the Recyle Bin.

    "limeybiker" <abbl(nospam)@att.net> wrote in message
    news:#iOMa#R8KHA.5464@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Well I used unlocker to delete them and sure enough it did, and the system
    > hasn't died as someone predicted.
    >
    > Unfortunately I now have five files in the recycle bin that won't go away.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > Ride safe
    > Barry
    > <©¿©>
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "limeybiker" <abbl(nospam)@att.net> wrote in message
    > news:uxG2%23QG8KHA.644@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    >>I have three directories in the root directory named
    >>
    >> 28e35e43bc9fba4052
    >> 564c1198e199c4fdd6f513f8b1a5b5
    >> 100145b6a635779a14
    >>
    >> How do I delete them.?
    >>
    >> All are 10mb, with update and support sub directories.
    >>
    >> I can't delete them, not even in safe mode.
    >> --
    >>
    >>
    >> Ride safe
    >> Barry
    >> <©¿©>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
  11. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    Pegasus [MVP] wrote:

    > limeybiker wrote ...
    >> Well I used unlocker to delete them and sure enough it did, and the system
    >> hasn't died as someone predicted.
    >>
    >> Unfortunately I now have five files in the recycle bin that won't go away.

    >
    > Restore them, then press Shift+Del to delete them without sending them to
    > the Recyle Bin.


    Or get CCleaner to help with this and other cleanup of your host. You can
    even configure CCleaner to run on login to do its cleanup every time you
    start/use Windows (but be sure to enable the option to leave temp files that
    are under a day old since some installs that require reboots to complete
    will use the temp folders to complete the install after the reboot). Once
    you install CCleaner, and besides navigating the Start menu to start it, you
    can right-click on the Recycle Bin to load Ccleaner.
     

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