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win7 32/64 bit dual boot same machine

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by npx@no.spam, Apr 3, 2010.

  1. npx@no.spam

    npx@no.spam Flightless Bird

    I have Win 7 Home Premium with 32 bit and 64 bit CDs, but only one
    activation key. Can I have, on just one computer, a w7 32 bit
    partition, and a w7 64 bit partition, dual boot system, using just one
    activation key? That would save buying another copy.

    I could ask Microsoft, but I thought I'd ask here first.
     
  2. neil

    neil Flightless Bird

    I wouldn't think a single key would allow you to activate more than one copy
    of Windows.
    Neil

    <npx@no.spam> wrote in message
    news:rr2fr597ubbpki7et25f0ih2c09s9u8c0o@4ax.com...
    > I have Win 7 Home Premium with 32 bit and 64 bit CDs, but only one
    > activation key. Can I have, on just one computer, a w7 32 bit
    > partition, and a w7 64 bit partition, dual boot system, using just one
    > activation key? That would save buying another copy.
    >
    > I could ask Microsoft, but I thought I'd ask here first.
     
  3. relic

    relic Flightless Bird

    <npx@no.spam> wrote in message
    news:rr2fr597ubbpki7et25f0ih2c09s9u8c0o@4ax.com...
    > I have Win 7 Home Premium with 32 bit and 64 bit CDs, but only one
    > activation key. Can I have, on just one computer, a w7 32 bit
    > partition, and a w7 64 bit partition, dual boot system, using just one
    > activation key? That would save buying another copy.
    >
    > I could ask Microsoft, but I thought I'd ask here first.


    If you have the "Windows 7 Home Premium Family Pack Upgrade 3-User" version,
    yes. Even a 3rd system.
     
  4. Joel

    Joel Flightless Bird

    npx@no.spam wrote:

    >I have Win 7 Home Premium with 32 bit and 64 bit CDs, but only one
    >activation key. Can I have, on just one computer, a w7 32 bit
    >partition, and a w7 64 bit partition, dual boot system, using just one
    >activation key? That would save buying another copy.
    >
    >I could ask Microsoft, but I thought I'd ask here first.



    No. You can switch between them, but only in the form of having one
    installed at a time (if you just want to try the version you don't
    currently have installed, though, you can install it with no key, and
    get a 30-day trial to see if it's better, and if so delete the first
    installation, and activate the new one with your key in Control
    Panel).

    --
    Joel Crump
     
  5. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Sat, 03 Apr 2010 19:45:31 +0100, npx@no.spam wrote:

    > I have Win 7 Home Premium with 32 bit and 64 bit CDs, but only one
    > activation key. Can I have, on just one computer, a w7 32 bit
    > partition, and a w7 64 bit partition, dual boot system, using just one
    > activation key? That would save buying another copy.



    No. You have two DVDs because you have the choice of using one *or*
    the other. However you bought only a single license, and you may not
    use both.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  6. Andrew

    Andrew Flightless Bird

    "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:bu4fr55v8fbjfvcritt319cjhqm4iujr8j@4ax.com...
    > On Sat, 03 Apr 2010 19:45:31 +0100, npx@no.spam wrote:
    >
    >> I have Win 7 Home Premium with 32 bit and 64 bit CDs, but only one
    >> activation key. Can I have, on just one computer, a w7 32 bit
    >> partition, and a w7 64 bit partition, dual boot system, using just one
    >> activation key? That would save buying another copy.

    >
    >
    > No. You have two DVDs because you have the choice of using one *or*
    > the other. However you bought only a single license, and you may not
    > use both.
    >


    I am going to test this out this week.
    I believe it can be done and both can be activated.
    The install makes a hash from the hardware inventory of the machine.
    Since both the 32 and 64 bit versions will make the same hash, the machine
    should be ID'd the same.
    It then sends the hash to the activation servers. As long as the hash is
    the same it will see that the machine is the same and allow activation. If
    the hash is different then it won't allow it.
    Since you can only have 1 install running at one time, I don't believe it is
    in violation of the license. You don't have it installed on 2 different
    machines, and you are only running 1 version at a time.
    I've done this before, but all my installs were Enterprise and on Corpnet
    where there were license servers so I never even had to type in an
    activation code.
    I haven't tried it at home.

    --
    Andrew
     
  7. Joel

    Joel Flightless Bird

    "Andrew" <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:

    >I am going to test this out this week.
    >I believe it can be done and both can be activated.
    >The install makes a hash from the hardware inventory of the machine.
    >Since both the 32 and 64 bit versions will make the same hash, the machine
    >should be ID'd the same.
    >It then sends the hash to the activation servers. As long as the hash is
    >the same it will see that the machine is the same and allow activation. If
    >the hash is different then it won't allow it.
    >Since you can only have 1 install running at one time, I don't believe it is
    >in violation of the license. You don't have it installed on 2 different
    >machines, and you are only running 1 version at a time.
    >I've done this before, but all my installs were Enterprise and on Corpnet
    >where there were license servers so I never even had to type in an
    >activation code.
    >I haven't tried it at home.



    Get ready to become very frustrated with your computer.

    --
    Joel Crump
     
  8. Andrew

    Andrew Flightless Bird

    "Joel" <joelcrump@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:m27fr5pi95c7nteeokdqutadsgu98d2rr0@4ax.com...
    > "Andrew" <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>I am going to test this out this week.
    >>I believe it can be done and both can be activated.
    >>The install makes a hash from the hardware inventory of the machine.
    >>Since both the 32 and 64 bit versions will make the same hash, the
    >>machine
    >>should be ID'd the same.
    >>It then sends the hash to the activation servers. As long as the hash is
    >>the same it will see that the machine is the same and allow activation.
    >>If
    >>the hash is different then it won't allow it.
    >>Since you can only have 1 install running at one time, I don't believe it
    >>is
    >>in violation of the license. You don't have it installed on 2 different
    >>machines, and you are only running 1 version at a time.
    >>I've done this before, but all my installs were Enterprise and on Corpnet
    >>where there were license servers so I never even had to type in an
    >>activation code.
    >>I haven't tried it at home.

    >
    >
    > Get ready to become very frustrated with your computer.
    >


    Worse things have happened :)

    --
    Andrew
    > --
    > Joel Crump
     
  9. Joel

    Joel Flightless Bird

    "Andrew" <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:

    >> Get ready to become very frustrated with your computer.

    >
    >Worse things have happened :)



    No doubt, but it just seems needless. You paid for it, and this will
    flag your key as being used in more than one place at once, and both
    installations will turn into crapware as punishment. If you really
    need both versions, you could just get a less expensive System Builder
    OEM copy to obtain the other one.

    --
    Joel Crump
     
  10. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:37:11 -0700, "Andrew"
    <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    >
    > "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:bu4fr55v8fbjfvcritt319cjhqm4iujr8j@4ax.com...
    > > On Sat, 03 Apr 2010 19:45:31 +0100, npx@no.spam wrote:
    > >
    > >> I have Win 7 Home Premium with 32 bit and 64 bit CDs, but only one
    > >> activation key. Can I have, on just one computer, a w7 32 bit
    > >> partition, and a w7 64 bit partition, dual boot system, using just one
    > >> activation key? That would save buying another copy.

    > >
    > >
    > > No. You have two DVDs because you have the choice of using one *or*
    > > the other. However you bought only a single license, and you may not
    > > use both.
    > >

    >
    > I am going to test this out this week.
    > I believe it can be done and both can be activated.



    The issue is not what *can* be done, it's what *may* be done. Doing
    this is a violation of the EULA.

    Can *you* do it and get away with the violation? I don't know; perhaps
    you can. Perhaps you can get away with robbing a bank too. That
    doesn't make it OK to do it.



    > The install makes a hash from the hardware inventory of the machine.
    > Since both the 32 and 64 bit versions will make the same hash, the machine
    > should be ID'd the same.
    > It then sends the hash to the activation servers. As long as the hash is
    > the same it will see that the machine is the same and allow activation. If
    > the hash is different then it won't allow it.
    > Since you can only have 1 install running at one time, I don't believe it is
    > in violation of the license. You don't have it installed on 2 different
    > machines, and you are only running 1 version at a time.
    > I've done this before, but all my installs were Enterprise and on Corpnet
    > where there were license servers so I never even had to type in an
    > activation code.
    > I haven't tried it at home.
    >
    > --
    > Andrew


    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  11. Andrew

    Andrew Flightless Bird

    "Joel" <joelcrump@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:129fr5tmqe2d9sdl3k21ikpidnh7ghcfct@4ax.com...
    > "Andrew" <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>> Get ready to become very frustrated with your computer.

    >>
    >>Worse things have happened :)

    >
    >
    > No doubt, but it just seems needless. You paid for it, and this will
    > flag your key as being used in more than one place at once, and both
    > installations will turn into crapware as punishment. If you really
    > need both versions, you could just get a less expensive System Builder
    > OEM copy to obtain the other one.
    >


    I get the Employee copies from the company store, they're super cheap.
    Being an MS Alumni has it's benefits.

    --
    Andrew
     
  12. Andrew

    Andrew Flightless Bird

    "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:9pafr59v51vjjo723di832af7dpj2p2lvs@4ax.com...
    > On Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:37:11 -0700, "Andrew"
    > <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    >> news:bu4fr55v8fbjfvcritt319cjhqm4iujr8j@4ax.com...
    >> > On Sat, 03 Apr 2010 19:45:31 +0100, npx@no.spam wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> I have Win 7 Home Premium with 32 bit and 64 bit CDs, but only one
    >> >> activation key. Can I have, on just one computer, a w7 32 bit
    >> >> partition, and a w7 64 bit partition, dual boot system, using just one
    >> >> activation key? That would save buying another copy.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > No. You have two DVDs because you have the choice of using one *or*
    >> > the other. However you bought only a single license, and you may not
    >> > use both.
    >> >

    >>
    >> I am going to test this out this week.
    >> I believe it can be done and both can be activated.

    >
    >
    > The issue is not what *can* be done, it's what *may* be done. Doing
    > this is a violation of the EULA.
    >

    I'm not so sure about that. I will have to read it. I think installing the
    OS on more than 1 machine is a violation of the EULA.

    > Can *you* do it and get away with the violation? I don't know; perhaps
    > you can. Perhaps you can get away with robbing a bank too. That
    > doesn't make it OK to do it.


    I wouldn't ever rob a bank, and I won't do it if the EULA explicitly states
    that more than 1 installation on the same machine is in violation. I don't
    think it says that though, so I will research it.

    --
    Andrew
     
  13. Andrew

    Andrew Flightless Bird

    "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:9pafr59v51vjjo723di832af7dpj2p2lvs@4ax.com...
    > On Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:37:11 -0700, "Andrew"
    > <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    >> news:bu4fr55v8fbjfvcritt319cjhqm4iujr8j@4ax.com...
    >> > On Sat, 03 Apr 2010 19:45:31 +0100, npx@no.spam wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> I have Win 7 Home Premium with 32 bit and 64 bit CDs, but only one
    >> >> activation key. Can I have, on just one computer, a w7 32 bit
    >> >> partition, and a w7 64 bit partition, dual boot system, using just one
    >> >> activation key? That would save buying another copy.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > No. You have two DVDs because you have the choice of using one *or*
    >> > the other. However you bought only a single license, and you may not
    >> > use both.
    >> >

    >>
    >> I am going to test this out this week.
    >> I believe it can be done and both can be activated.

    >
    >
    > The issue is not what *can* be done, it's what *may* be done. Doing
    > this is a violation of the EULA.
    >
    > Can *you* do it and get away with the violation? I don't know; perhaps
    > you can. Perhaps you can get away with robbing a bank too. That
    > doesn't make it OK to do it.
    >
    >
    >
    >> The install makes a hash from the hardware inventory of the machine.
    >> Since both the 32 and 64 bit versions will make the same hash, the
    >> machine
    >> should be ID'd the same.
    >> It then sends the hash to the activation servers. As long as the hash is
    >> the same it will see that the machine is the same and allow activation.
    >> If
    >> the hash is different then it won't allow it.
    >> Since you can only have 1 install running at one time, I don't believe it
    >> is
    >> in violation of the license. You don't have it installed on 2 different
    >> machines, and you are only running 1 version at a time.
    >> I've done this before, but all my installs were Enterprise and on Corpnet
    >> where there were license servers so I never even had to type in an
    >> activation code.
    >> I haven't tried it at home.
    >>

    >


    From the EULA

    a. Software. The software includes desktop operating system software. This
    software does not include Windows Live services. Windows Live is a service
    available from Microsoft under a separate agreement.
    b. License Model. The software is licensed on a per copy per computer basis.
    A computer is a physical hardware system with an internal storage device
    capable of running the software. A hardware partition or blade is considered
    to be a separate computer.

    [I'm ok here...the same drive with 2 different partitions...not hardware
    partitions.)



    2. INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS.
    a. One Copy per Computer. You may install one copy of the software on one
    computer. That computer is the "licensed computer."

    [Ok, here is an issue with doing it.]

    b. Licensed Computer. You may use the software on up to two processors on
    the licensed computer at one time. Unless otherwise provided in these
    license terms, you may not use the software on any other computer.

    [Well, I'm glad I'm not using a triple or quad core machine :)]

    c. Number of Users. Unless otherwise provided in these license terms, only
    one user may use the software at a time.

    [this one makes no sense, sure only 1 user can log in at a time unless it's
    Server, but this stops me and my son from sitting in front of the computer
    at the same time and doing something.]

    d. Alternative Versions. The software may include more than one version,
    such as 32-bit and 64-bit. You may install and use only one version at one
    time.

    [There's the clincher. it is forbidden in the EULA.]

    Oh well I guess I can't try it, but I think it will work.

    --
    Andrew
     
  14. Joel

    Joel Flightless Bird

    "Andrew" <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:

    >d. Alternative Versions. The software may include more than one version,
    >such as 32-bit and 64-bit. You may install and use only one version at one
    >time.
    >
    >[There's the clincher. it is forbidden in the EULA.]
    >
    >Oh well I guess I can't try it, but I think it will work.



    You can always get both activated by lying to the employee on the
    activation line, but it won't be worth it. Activation is *not* the
    primary way this is tracked - inevitably, the first installation will
    get booted up, and transmit your key to MS for one reason or another,
    and it will be undeniable that you didn't delete the first
    installation.

    --
    Joel Crump
     
  15. Joel

    Joel Flightless Bird

    "Andrew" <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:

    >> If you really
    >> need both versions, you could just get a less expensive System Builder
    >> OEM copy to obtain the other one.

    >
    >I get the Employee copies from the company store, they're super cheap.
    >Being an MS Alumni has it's benefits.



    Heck, I'd buy two copies at what appear to be the prices they charge.
    Someone posted on a blog that a copy of Vista Ultimate (current OS at
    the time of the post) was only $45 for the full version. And to think
    I paid $140 for my desktop's OEM of Win7 Pro, and $100 for this
    laptop's OEM of Home Premium. Not that I mind, of course - it's the
    greatest OS I've ever used.

    --
    Joel Crump
     
  16. Char Jackson

    Char Jackson Flightless Bird

    On Sat, 03 Apr 2010 13:58:06 -0700, "Ken Blake, MVP"
    <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote:

    >On Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:37:11 -0700, "Andrew"
    ><yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    >> news:bu4fr55v8fbjfvcritt319cjhqm4iujr8j@4ax.com...
    >> > On Sat, 03 Apr 2010 19:45:31 +0100, npx@no.spam wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> I have Win 7 Home Premium with 32 bit and 64 bit CDs, but only one
    >> >> activation key. Can I have, on just one computer, a w7 32 bit
    >> >> partition, and a w7 64 bit partition, dual boot system, using just one
    >> >> activation key? That would save buying another copy.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > No. You have two DVDs because you have the choice of using one *or*
    >> > the other. However you bought only a single license, and you may not
    >> > use both.
    >> >

    >>
    >> I am going to test this out this week.
    >> I believe it can be done and both can be activated.

    >
    >
    >The issue is not what *can* be done, it's what *may* be done. Doing
    >this is a violation of the EULA.


    Just wondering out loud, I wonder what percentage of people care what
    the EULA says? I suppose we'll never know, but I suspect that most
    people don't read EULA's very closely and simply rely on their own
    morals to decide right from wrong.

    >Can *you* do it and get away with the violation? I don't know; perhaps
    >you can. Perhaps you can get away with robbing a bank too. That
    >doesn't make it OK to do it.


    Violating a sentence in a EULA is hardly on a level with robbing a
    bank. :)
     
  17. Joel

    Joel Flightless Bird

    Char Jackson <none@none.invalid> wrote:
    >On Sat, 03 Apr 2010 13:58:06 -0700, "Ken Blake, MVP"
    ><kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote:
    >
    >>The issue is not what *can* be done, it's what *may* be done. Doing
    >>this is a violation of the EULA.

    >
    >Just wondering out loud, I wonder what percentage of people care what
    >the EULA says? I suppose we'll never know, but I suspect that most
    >people don't read EULA's very closely and simply rely on their own
    >morals to decide right from wrong.
    >
    >>Can *you* do it and get away with the violation? I don't know; perhaps
    >>you can. Perhaps you can get away with robbing a bank too. That
    >>doesn't make it OK to do it.

    >
    >Violating a sentence in a EULA is hardly on a level with robbing a
    >bank. :)



    Debating whether the rules are reasonable may be worth doing,
    intellectually, but it really doesn't matter what anyone thinks of
    them - the reality is, they do keep track of product keys' usage. As
    soon as the first installation transmits the key, it proves that it
    wasn't deleted before the new installation was activated, and that
    will suck ass for the user. It's just not worth it.

    --
    Joel Crump
     
  18. Doum

    Doum Flightless Bird

    "Andrew" <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> écrivait
    news:hp8f73$la6$1@news.eternal-september.org:

    <snip>
    >
    > b. Licensed Computer. You may use the software on up to two processors
    > on the licensed computer at one time. Unless otherwise provided in
    > these license terms, you may not use the software on any other
    > computer.
    >
    > [Well, I'm glad I'm not using a triple or quad core machine :)]
    >


    A quad core processor is ONE processor as far as EULA is concerned.

    You can have a machine with up to two quad core processors or whatever the
    number of cores the processor has.
     
  19. Andrew

    Andrew Flightless Bird

    "Doum" <me@domain.net> wrote in message
    news:XnF9D517AC4AE011doumdomainnet@94.75.214.39...
    > "Andrew" <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> écrivait
    > news:hp8f73$la6$1@news.eternal-september.org:
    >
    > <snip>
    >>
    >> b. Licensed Computer. You may use the software on up to two processors
    >> on the licensed computer at one time. Unless otherwise provided in
    >> these license terms, you may not use the software on any other
    >> computer.
    >>
    >> [Well, I'm glad I'm not using a triple or quad core machine :)]
    >>

    >
    > A quad core processor is ONE processor as far as EULA is concerned.
    >
    > You can have a machine with up to two quad core processors or whatever the
    > number of cores the processor has.
    >
    >


    Yeah I thought about the difference between cores and processors after I
    posted.


    --
    Andrew
     
  20. Andrew

    Andrew Flightless Bird

    "Joel" <joelcrump@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:jt7gr554j71csc905ucda4u4dipc9vvnme@4ax.com...
    > "Andrew" <yogig@no.spam.hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>> If you really
    >>> need both versions, you could just get a less expensive System Builder
    >>> OEM copy to obtain the other one.

    >>
    >>I get the Employee copies from the company store, they're super cheap.
    >>Being an MS Alumni has it's benefits.

    >
    >
    > Heck, I'd buy two copies at what appear to be the prices they charge.
    > Someone posted on a blog that a copy of Vista Ultimate (current OS at
    > the time of the post) was only $45 for the full version. And to think
    > I paid $140 for my desktop's OEM of Win7 Pro, and $100 for this
    > laptop's OEM of Home Premium. Not that I mind, of course - it's the
    > greatest OS I've ever used.
    >
    > --
    > Joel Crump


    I think it is $50.00 for Ultimate, although there might be a $45.00 Upgrade
    package, I don't recall.

    --
    Andrew
     

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