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When does Windows go into Standby mode?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by void.no.spam.com@gmail.com, Mar 31, 2010.

  1. void.no.spam.com@gmail.com

    void.no.spam.com@gmail.com Flightless Bird

    If I want to start a video-editing process that will take several
    hours to complete, should I disable the standby in Windows? Or will
    Windows not go into standby in that situation?
     
  2. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Mar 31, 2:51 am, "void.no.spam....@gmail.com"
    <void.no.spam....@gmail.com> wrote:
    > If I want to start a video-editing process that will take several
    > hours to complete, should I disable the standby in Windows?  Or will
    > Windows not go into standby in that situation?


    For power options and maintaining data integrity:

    Stand By is the riskiest of all choices.

    Hibernate is less risky.

    Properly shutting down your system is the safest but not always the
    most attractive or convenient.

    If you want to do something that takes a long time and would like your
    system to somehow switch off when the process is done, be sure to
    think about what you are going to do if whatever you are working on is
    totally lost when the event occurs (especially Stand By) and adjust
    your methods and expectations accordingly so it will not be a complete
    shock when it happens. That way, you will be less distraught when
    something bad happens later, because you have already thought about
    the possibility beforehand.

    You may not have a problem at all if the stars are all in alignment
    and your things are all finished, but it might happen and it depends
    on what you are doing. It only takes one incident to help adjust the
    thinking process to realize Stand By may not be the wisest choice for
    some things. Stand By was not invented to shut your computer off
    after video editing but you can try to use it for that and it might
    work just fine. What does your video editing software have to say
    about it?

    XP will start the timer for a chosen power saving option when the
    system enters an idle state, but what is XPs definition of idle? If
    your editing is done and not using much CPU, the power saving
    countdown begins.

    According to MS, the idle timer starts when no process is using more
    than 10% of the CPU for the chosen option to be invoked - 20 minutes,
    30 minutes, etc.

    Any action or process that that causes a mere blip of 10% CPU usage
    resets the timer back to zero. Depending on what you are doing and
    have running your system may never enter the chosen power saving mode,
    but there is always a good explanation for it.
     
  3. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In
    news:512c1353-3a44-42f7-9731-ddb4e4ac6cce@z4g2000yqa.googlegroups.com,
    void.no.spam.com@gmail.com <void.no.spam.com@gmail.com> typed:
    > If I want to start a video-editing process that will take
    > several hours to complete, should I disable the standby in
    > Windows? Or will Windows not go into standby in that
    > situation?


    If you mean you're set to go to Standby after a programmed
    amount of time, yes, you should disable that. Just having
    Standby enabled but ONLY caused manually and on purpose, it
    doesn't really matter.
    I've never noticed problems with standby during editing,
    but I did find that standby, or coming out of it, would cause
    some glitched frames during a long render. Turned auto-standby
    off and the glitched frames disappeared. I suspect it was a
    fight for the cpu between the rendering and needs of comign
    out of standby.
    OTOH, I have a buddy who leaves it on; the screen blanks
    but the video process continues right along just fine with no
    problems. So I guess you'd have to call it a "ymmv". He has a
    GAteway and I have a Dell.

    HTH,

    Twayne`
     

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