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Very Slow PC

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Searcher7, Feb 15, 2010.

  1. Searcher7

    Searcher7 Flightless Bird

    I have a Dell XPS-Z 866Mhz Pentium 3, with 384mb and a 20Gig hard
    drive that I use for the web, and I've been having speed issues with
    my system that are worse than usual.

    Everything which includes loading pages from the internet, closing
    windows(if they close at all), switching between tabs, starting up
    apps, closing apps, etc. has become really sluggish.

    My DSL is slow to begin with and is not even as fast as dial-up was
    when I was using it over a decade ago.(But that is obviously a Verizon
    issue).

    I try to stay away from anti-virus apps and the like because they have
    traditionally made my system worse than it was before their
    installation and use.

    But this time I took a chance and installed AVG, and even
    SUPERAntiSpyware.

    They didn't seem to do much, but that AVG "Resident Shield alert"
    window pops up constantly. (Usually when I attempt to open a file).

    Many of which I can no longer open or they open with difficulty. For
    instance when I attempt to open mspaint I get a pop-up box that says
    Missing Shortcut". All this while the AVG "Resident Shield
    alert"(Multiple threat detection) windows list a variety of files that
    are supposed to be infected.(Usually by something called "Win32/
    Virut)." It seems like all of the files I have are infected. I can't
    open the calculator or the calender because they can't be found.

    I also can no longer open a text file from my desktop without the
    "Open with" box popping up.

    (Last month I had to do a reinstall after installing Avast because it
    made my system useless).

    It looks as though I'll have to reinstall XP again, but thought I'd
    ask for any ideas on how to keep these problems from occurring all
    over again.

    Thanks.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
     
  2. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Searcher7 wrote:
    > I have a Dell XPS-Z 866Mhz Pentium 3, with 384mb and a 20Gig hard
    > drive that I use for the web, and I've been having speed issues with
    > my system that are worse than usual.
    >
    > Everything which includes loading pages from the internet, closing
    > windows(if they close at all), switching between tabs, starting up
    > apps, closing apps, etc. has become really sluggish.
    >
    > My DSL is slow to begin with and is not even as fast as dial-up was
    > when I was using it over a decade ago.(But that is obviously a Verizon
    > issue).
    >
    > I try to stay away from anti-virus apps and the like because they have
    > traditionally made my system worse than it was before their
    > installation and use.
    >
    > But this time I took a chance and installed AVG, and even
    > SUPERAntiSpyware.
    >
    > They didn't seem to do much, but that AVG "Resident Shield alert"
    > window pops up constantly. (Usually when I attempt to open a file).
    >
    > Many of which I can no longer open or they open with difficulty. For
    > instance when I attempt to open mspaint I get a pop-up box that says
    > Missing Shortcut". All this while the AVG "Resident Shield
    > alert"(Multiple threat detection) windows list a variety of files that
    > are supposed to be infected.(Usually by something called "Win32/
    > Virut)." It seems like all of the files I have are infected. I can't
    > open the calculator or the calender because they can't be found.
    >
    > I also can no longer open a text file from my desktop without the
    > "Open with" box popping up.
    >
    > (Last month I had to do a reinstall after installing Avast because it
    > made my system useless).
    >
    > It looks as though I'll have to reinstall XP again, but thought I'd
    > ask for any ideas on how to keep these problems from occurring all
    > over again.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten Island, New York.


    It says here, Virut attacks .exe files, so I guess it makes sense you'd
    be getting a lot of warnings.

    http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Threat/Encyclopedia/Entry.aspx?Name=Win32/Virut

    I'd probably start, by considering whether you have any "vectors" within reach
    of the computer. Years ago, I had to break the fingers of a fellow employee, when
    after disinfecting all the computers in my department, this individual drags an
    infected floppy diskette out of his desk drawer (after being asked whether he had
    any floppies like that), and proceeds to reinfect our office computers. So think
    about any USB flash drives you might have lying around. It could be, that before
    you got your protection in place, you used something like that and reinfected the
    system.

    There are two possibilities. Either the tools you're using aren't good enough
    to stop Virut. Or the reinstallation technique you're using, is missing the
    cleanup of something, and you're getting reinfected again. Since that article
    above says Virut attacks .exe files, it might be attacking .exe files on
    your second hard drive. And even if you reinstall WinXP on C:, perhaps you
    clicked on something on the other drive, before you were protected again.

    You might benefit from scanning all the media connected to the computer.
    Maybe if you clean up all the other partitions, then reinstall C:, you'll be
    in better shape. There are probably a number of ways to do that, and these
    are just some that I've tried - someone else may have their own favorites.

    *******

    You could try something like this. It scans for Windows malware from a Linux
    LiveCD. You burn a CD using the downloadable ISO9660 file. (A tool like Nero,
    converts the ISO9660 file, into a bootable CD. Or, you could always give a
    free burner program like Imgburn a try, and see if it can do the same thing.
    There should be something you can get for free, that can burn a bootable CD.
    In any case, you don't just "copy" the file to a blank CD, and you need a
    burner program to do the conversion.)

    http://devbuilds.kaspersky-labs.com/devbuilds/RescueDisk/

    kav_rescue_2008.iso 119,701,504 bytes

    When you boot that CD, it will take 5-10 minutes while it downloads 27MB
    of fresh virus definitions. It then lists all your partitions, but when it
    comes to partition drive letters, it just makes up letters, C:, D:, E:,
    for all partitions it can see. For example, my C: drive is actually D:.
    If you can't figure out which partition is which, tick all of them and
    scan the whole works. Perhaps that way, any .exe files on the other
    partitions, will be quarantined.

    The program can be slow at times, and if you exit the scanner and start
    it again, it will go a bit faster. That is a trick I use to speed up the
    scanning rate. The environment has a "Terminal" window in the menu, you
    open a terminal and give the command to start the tool again. When you
    attempt to scan with it a second time, it will ask whether it should
    "resume" from where it left off, and you can say "yes" to that. The
    command to start the tool, after you've exited it, is this.

    /usr/bin/kav.exe &

    So if it seems to be running slow, don't reboot the computer, just stop
    the scanning program, and then start it again from a terminal window.

    In any case, be methodical in your approach to reinstalling, to make sure
    the problem isn't the same one that happened to you the first time. No
    matter what tools you chose to use.

    An alternative to that, is to experiment with the Kaspersky "30 day trial".
    I used that several years ago, to put a stop to an active infection. And
    later purchased a one year subscription. When it came time to renew at
    the end of one year, I gave up on it, because the program was just too
    "chatty" for words. I tried their tech support, and they didn't think
    it was unreasonable for their program to be constantly interrupting
    me for nothing. But if you want a free "morning after pill", that is
    another alternative. I like their free CD a bit better, because
    it doesn't hang around later (even if it isn't giving continuous
    protection, and just does scans when I need them).

    When I used my "30 day trial" version, it took multiple reboots, until
    the infection was removed. The process is not quick or quiet, but it
    did seem to be thorough. Like any AV, Kav is intrusive, and does
    suck up CPU cycles, but that is the nature of active AV protection.
    You might use it to clean up all the partitions on your computer,
    and then reinstall C: and wipe out Kav.

    Paul
     
  3. PA Bear [MS MVP]

    PA Bear [MS MVP] Flightless Bird

    > I try to stay away from anti-virus apps and the like because they have
    > traditionally made my system worse than it was before their
    > installation and use.


    That's prolly because your computer was already infected (like it is now)
    when you installed the AV app!

    Searcher7 wrote:
    > I have a Dell XPS-Z 866Mhz Pentium 3, with 384mb and a 20Gig hard
    > drive that I use for the web, and I've been having speed issues with
    > my system that are worse than usual.
    >
    > Everything which includes loading pages from the internet, closing
    > windows(if they close at all), switching between tabs, starting up
    > apps, closing apps, etc. has become really sluggish.
    >
    > My DSL is slow to begin with and is not even as fast as dial-up was
    > when I was using it over a decade ago.(But that is obviously a Verizon
    > issue).
    >
    > I try to stay away from anti-virus apps and the like because they have
    > traditionally made my system worse than it was before their
    > installation and use.
    >
    > But this time I took a chance and installed AVG, and even
    > SUPERAntiSpyware.
    >
    > They didn't seem to do much, but that AVG "Resident Shield alert"
    > window pops up constantly. (Usually when I attempt to open a file).
    >
    > Many of which I can no longer open or they open with difficulty. For
    > instance when I attempt to open mspaint I get a pop-up box that says
    > Missing Shortcut". All this while the AVG "Resident Shield
    > alert"(Multiple threat detection) windows list a variety of files that
    > are supposed to be infected.(Usually by something called "Win32/
    > Virut)." It seems like all of the files I have are infected. I can't
    > open the calculator or the calender because they can't be found.
    >
    > I also can no longer open a text file from my desktop without the
    > "Open with" box popping up.
    >
    > (Last month I had to do a reinstall after installing Avast because it
    > made my system useless).
    >
    > It looks as though I'll have to reinstall XP again, but thought I'd
    > ask for any ideas on how to keep these problems from occurring all
    > over again.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten Island, New York.
     
  4. 20100216

    20100216 Flightless Bird

    Ignore everything you have read on this topic so far because there is no
    simple solution to slow systems over time. This happens if you are using
    Microsoft Operating system and don't maintain your system regularly. Taking
    any advise from Pig-Bear is like asking McDonalds how to look after your
    herd of cattle!!

    All you have to do now is to reset your system to factory level and start
    everything again. With DELL systems this is very easy to do. Defrag and
    cleaning of tmp files and even using anti-virus software of all types -
    NOTHING WORKS! Don't waste your time on any of that nonsense.

    hth

    "Searcher7" <Searcher7@mail.con2.com> wrote in message
    news:e459e1d2-a93e-4620-9187-19ddeac7aded@n3g2000vbl.googlegroups.com...
    >I have a Dell XPS-Z 866Mhz Pentium 3, with 384mb and a 20Gig hard
    > drive that I use for the web, and I've been having speed issues with
    > my system that are worse than usual.
    >
    > Everything which includes loading pages from the internet, closing
    > windows(if they close at all), switching between tabs, starting up
    > apps, closing apps, etc. has become really sluggish.
    >
    > My DSL is slow to begin with and is not even as fast as dial-up was
    > when I was using it over a decade ago.(But that is obviously a Verizon
    > issue).
    >
    > I try to stay away from anti-virus apps and the like because they have
    > traditionally made my system worse than it was before their
    > installation and use.
    >
    > But this time I took a chance and installed AVG, and even
    > SUPERAntiSpyware.
    >
    > They didn't seem to do much, but that AVG "Resident Shield alert"
    > window pops up constantly. (Usually when I attempt to open a file).
    >
    > Many of which I can no longer open or they open with difficulty. For
    > instance when I attempt to open mspaint I get a pop-up box that says
    > Missing Shortcut". All this while the AVG "Resident Shield
    > alert"(Multiple threat detection) windows list a variety of files that
    > are supposed to be infected.(Usually by something called "Win32/
    > Virut)." It seems like all of the files I have are infected. I can't
    > open the calculator or the calender because they can't be found.
    >
    > I also can no longer open a text file from my desktop without the
    > "Open with" box popping up.
    >
    > (Last month I had to do a reinstall after installing Avast because it
    > made my system useless).
    >
    > It looks as though I'll have to reinstall XP again, but thought I'd
    > ask for any ideas on how to keep these problems from occurring all
    > over again.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten Island, New York.
     
  5. Shenan Stanley

    Shenan Stanley Flightless Bird

    <snipped>

    20100216 wrote:
    <snip>
    > is like asking McDonalds how to look after your herd of cattle!!

    <snip>

    From what I hear - that would be a fairly safe thing to do. ;-)

    --
    Shenan Stanley
    MS-MVP
    --
    How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
     
  6. 20100216

    20100216 Flightless Bird

    "Shenan Stanley" <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:-OG9eE6xrKHA.3536@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...

    > From what I hear - that would be a fairly safe thing to do. ;-)
    >


    That's a subjective opinion. Have you come across a turkey that had a
    fantastic Christmas?
     
  7. Tom Willett

    Tom Willett Flightless Bird

    "20100216" <20100216@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:uKega8xrKHA.6140@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    :
    : "Shenan Stanley" <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote in message
    : news:-OG9eE6xrKHA.3536@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    :
    : > From what I hear - that would be a fairly safe thing to do. ;-)
    : >
    :
    : That's a subjective opinion. Have you come across a turkey that had a
    : fantastic Christmas?
    :
    Sure..in a household that serves just ham.
    :
     
  8. William R. Walsh

    William R. Walsh Flightless Bird

    Hi!

    > I have a Dell XPS-Z 866Mhz Pentium 3, with 384mb and
    > a 20Gig hard drive that I use for the web, and I've
    > been having speed issues with my system that are worse
    > than usual.


    You would do very well to install the maximum amount of supported RAM in
    this system, which is 512MB. That alone could help quite a bit. XP is
    "OK but not great" with 384MB.

    > I try to stay away from anti-virus apps and the like
    > because they have traditionally made my system worse
    > than it was before their installation and use.


    You're about to see why that was a bad idea.

    I have a customer who is running a modern version of Norton Anti-Virus
    on a very similar system to yours (also a Dell, and roughly the same
    clock speed and vintage). It works perfectly well, and the performance
    hit was minimal (proof that Norton/Symantec are perhaps FINALLY getting
    their act together here).

    > "Win32/ Virut)." It seems like all of the files I have are
    > infected.


    At this point, a great many of them probably are. You probably can't fix
    this without the use of a healthy computer in which you could scan the
    boot drive from your computer.

    As it is, it appears that your copy of Windows XP has been damaged quite
    badly and who knows what else might be lurking there. It will be a
    better use of your time to backup the data you care about and then nuke
    the installation of Windows. Start over fresh, get your copy of Windows
    up to date and then INSTALL and USE an anti-virus product right away.

    If you don't plan to do this for yourself, do it for the better good of
    the Internet. Your computer could be a "zombie" used to propagate spam,
    scams and malware without your knowing it.

    William
     
  9. HeyBub

    HeyBub Flightless Bird

    20100216 wrote:
    > Ignore everything you have read on this topic so far because there is
    > no simple solution to slow systems over time.


    There certainly is.


    > This happens if you
    > are using Microsoft Operating system and don't maintain your system
    > regularly.


    Balderdash. It's not the lack of maintenance that's the culprit, maintenance
    is designed to get fix the problems.

    > Taking any advise from Pig-Bear is like asking McDonalds
    > how to look after your herd of cattle!!


    How is TAKING advice equivalent to ASKING for advice? I think you are
    terribly confused.

    >
    > All you have to do now is to reset your system to factory level and
    > start everything again. With DELL systems this is very easy to do. Defrag
    > and cleaning of tmp files and even using anti-virus software
    > of all types - NOTHING WORKS! Don't waste your time on any of that
    > nonsense.


    Yep. Confused.
     
  10. 20100216

    20100216 Flightless Bird

    HeyBub wrote:
    >
    > 20100216 wrote:
    > > Ignore everything you have read on this topic so far because there is
    > > no simple solution to slow systems over time.

    >
    > There certainly is.
    >

    Produce one if you know that works.
    >
    > Balderdash. It's not the lack of maintenance that's the culprit, maintenance
    > is designed to get fix the problems.


    what problems do you fix with maintenance? Is Slow machines considered
    to be a problem?

    > How is TAKING advice equivalent to ASKING for advice? I think you are
    > terribly confused.
    >


    Piggy does offer "a sort of" advice here.


    > Yep. Confused.


    It is you who is confused. Get your boobs enlarged boy!.
     
  11. Searcher7

    Searcher7 Flightless Bird

    On Feb 15, 11:56 pm, Paul <nos...@needed.com> wrote:
    > Searcher7 wrote:
    > > I have a Dell XPS-Z 866Mhz Pentium 3, with 384mb and a 20Gig hard
    > > drive that I use for the web, and I've been having speed issues with
    > > my system that are worse than usual.

    >
    > > Everything which includes loading pages from the internet, closing
    > > windows(if they close at all), switching between tabs, starting up
    > > apps, closing apps, etc. has become really sluggish.

    >
    > > My DSL is slow to begin with and is not even as fast as dial-up was
    > > when I was using it over a decade ago.(But that is obviously a Verizon
    > > issue).

    >
    > > I try to stay away from anti-virus apps and the like because they have
    > > traditionally made my system worse than it was before their
    > > installation and use.

    >
    > > But this time I took a chance and installed AVG, and even
    > > SUPERAntiSpyware.

    >
    > > They didn't seem to do much, but that AVG "Resident Shield alert"
    > > window pops up constantly. (Usually when I attempt to open a file).

    >
    > > Many of which I can no longer open or they open with difficulty. For
    > > instance when I attempt to open mspaint I get a pop-up box that says
    > > Missing Shortcut". All this while the AVG "Resident Shield
    > > alert"(Multiple threat detection) windows list a variety of files that
    > > are supposed to be infected.(Usually by something called "Win32/
    > > Virut)." It seems like all of the files I have are infected. I can't
    > > open the calculator or the calender because they can't be found.

    >
    > > I also can no longer open a text file from my desktop without the
    > > "Open with" box popping up.

    >
    > > (Last month I had to do a reinstall after installing Avast because it
    > > made my system useless).

    >
    > > It looks as though I'll have to reinstall XP again, but thought I'd
    > > ask for any ideas on how to keep these problems from occurring all
    > > over again.

    >
    > > Thanks.

    >
    > > Darren Harris
    > > Staten Island, New York.

    >
    > It says here, Virut attacks .exe files, so I guess it makes sense you'd
    > be getting a lot of warnings.
    >
    > http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Threat/Encyclopedia/Entry.as...
    >
    > I'd probably start, by considering whether you have any "vectors" within reach
    > of the computer. Years ago, I had to break the fingers of a fellow employee, when
    > after disinfecting all the computers in my department, this individual drags an
    > infected floppy diskette out of his desk drawer (after being asked whether he had
    > any floppies like that), and proceeds to reinfect our office computers. So think
    > about any USB flash drives you might have lying around. It could be, thatbefore
    > you got your protection in place, you used something like that and reinfected the
    > system.
    >
    > There are two possibilities. Either the tools you're using aren't good enough
    > to stop Virut. Or the reinstallation technique you're using, is missing the
    > cleanup of something, and you're getting reinfected again. Since that article
    > above says Virut attacks .exe files, it might be attacking .exe files on
    > your second hard drive. And even if you reinstall WinXP on C:, perhaps you
    > clicked on something on the other drive, before you were protected again.
    >
    > You might benefit from scanning all the media connected to the computer.
    > Maybe if you clean up all the other partitions, then reinstall C:, you'llbe
    > in better shape. There are probably a number of ways to do that, and these
    > are just some that I've tried - someone else may have their own favorites..
    >
    > *******
    >
    > You could try something like this. It scans for Windows malware from a Linux
    > LiveCD. You burn a CD using the downloadable ISO9660 file. (A tool like Nero,
    > converts the ISO9660 file, into a bootable CD. Or, you could always give a
    > free burner program like Imgburn a try, and see if it can do the same thing.
    > There should be something you can get for free, that can burn a bootable CD.
    > In any case, you don't just "copy" the file to a blank CD, and you need a
    > burner program to do the conversion.)
    >
    > http://devbuilds.kaspersky-labs.com/devbuilds/RescueDisk/
    >
    >     kav_rescue_2008.iso    119,701,504 bytes
    >
    > When you boot that CD, it will take 5-10 minutes while it downloads 27MB
    > of fresh virus definitions. It then lists all your partitions, but when it
    > comes to partition drive letters, it just makes up letters, C:, D:, E:,
    > for all partitions it can see. For example, my C: drive is actually D:.
    > If you can't figure out which partition is which, tick all of them and
    > scan the whole works. Perhaps that way, any .exe files on the other
    > partitions, will be quarantined.
    >
    > The program can be slow at times, and if you exit the scanner and start
    > it again, it will go a bit faster. That is a trick I use to speed up the
    > scanning rate. The environment has a "Terminal" window in the menu, you
    > open a terminal and give the command to start the tool again. When you
    > attempt to scan with it a second time, it will ask whether it should
    > "resume" from where it left off, and you can say "yes" to that. The
    > command to start the tool, after you've exited it, is this.
    >
    >        /usr/bin/kav.exe &
    >
    > So if it seems to be running slow, don't reboot the computer, just stop
    > the scanning program, and then start it again from a terminal window.
    >
    > In any case, be methodical in your approach to reinstalling, to make sure
    > the problem isn't the same one that happened to you the first time. No
    > matter what tools you chose to use.
    >
    > An alternative to that, is to experiment with the Kaspersky "30 day trial".
    > I used that several years ago, to put a stop to an active infection. And
    > later purchased a one year subscription. When it came time to renew at
    > the end of one year, I gave up on it, because the program was just too
    > "chatty" for words. I tried their tech support, and they didn't think
    > it was unreasonable for their program to be constantly interrupting
    > me for nothing. But if you want a free "morning after pill", that is
    > another alternative. I like their free CD a bit better, because
    > it doesn't hang around later (even if it isn't giving continuous
    > protection, and just does scans when I need them).
    >
    > When I used my "30 day trial" version, it took multiple reboots, until
    > the infection was removed. The process is not quick or quiet, but it
    > did seem to be thorough. Like any AV, Kav is intrusive, and does
    > suck up CPU cycles, but that is the nature of active AV protection.
    > You might use it to clean up all the partitions on your computer,
    > and then reinstall C: and wipe out Kav.
    >
    >     Paul


    Thanks.

    When things get too complicated reinstalling Windows becomes the best
    option.

    I had to install twice in one day last month because after the first
    installation I downloaded Avast. No other drives were connected to my
    pc. My pc kept freezing at the desktop after the Avast install.
    (Perhaps it was a bad install?).

    What do you think of downloading Anti-Virus and anti-Malware apps to a
    USB micro drive, and then after installing Windows again, transferring
    the apps from the USB drives to the "C" drive, and then installing
    them before I connect to the internet?

    Is this even possible?

    Thanks.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
     
  12. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Searcher7 wrote:
    > On Feb 15, 11:56 pm, Paul <nos...@needed.com> wrote:
    >> Searcher7 wrote:
    >>> I have a Dell XPS-Z 866Mhz Pentium 3, with 384mb and a 20Gig hard
    >>> drive that I use for the web, and I've been having speed issues with
    >>> my system that are worse than usual.
    >>> Everything which includes loading pages from the internet, closing
    >>> windows(if they close at all), switching between tabs, starting up
    >>> apps, closing apps, etc. has become really sluggish.
    >>> My DSL is slow to begin with and is not even as fast as dial-up was
    >>> when I was using it over a decade ago.(But that is obviously a Verizon
    >>> issue).
    >>> I try to stay away from anti-virus apps and the like because they have
    >>> traditionally made my system worse than it was before their
    >>> installation and use.
    >>> But this time I took a chance and installed AVG, and even
    >>> SUPERAntiSpyware.
    >>> They didn't seem to do much, but that AVG "Resident Shield alert"
    >>> window pops up constantly. (Usually when I attempt to open a file).
    >>> Many of which I can no longer open or they open with difficulty. For
    >>> instance when I attempt to open mspaint I get a pop-up box that says
    >>> Missing Shortcut". All this while the AVG "Resident Shield
    >>> alert"(Multiple threat detection) windows list a variety of files that
    >>> are supposed to be infected.(Usually by something called "Win32/
    >>> Virut)." It seems like all of the files I have are infected. I can't
    >>> open the calculator or the calender because they can't be found.
    >>> I also can no longer open a text file from my desktop without the
    >>> "Open with" box popping up.
    >>> (Last month I had to do a reinstall after installing Avast because it
    >>> made my system useless).
    >>> It looks as though I'll have to reinstall XP again, but thought I'd
    >>> ask for any ideas on how to keep these problems from occurring all
    >>> over again.
    >>> Thanks.
    >>> Darren Harris
    >>> Staten Island, New York.


    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > When things get too complicated reinstalling Windows becomes the best
    > option.
    >
    > I had to install twice in one day last month because after the first
    > installation I downloaded Avast. No other drives were connected to my
    > pc. My pc kept freezing at the desktop after the Avast install.
    > (Perhaps it was a bad install?).
    >
    > What do you think of downloading Anti-Virus and anti-Malware apps to a
    > USB micro drive, and then after installing Windows again, transferring
    > the apps from the USB drives to the "C" drive, and then installing
    > them before I connect to the internet?
    >
    > Is this even possible?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten Island, New York.


    I would press and hold down the shift key, when plugging in the USB drive.
    That is to prevent any autorun from happening. That is the only precaution I
    can think of. (I'm worried about any malware, that could use Autorun as
    a way to be awakened.) Note the warning here, that you would need to press
    the shift key, until the thing is mounted and recognized. I should probably
    have my system set up to have Autorun turned off entirely, because I have
    no use for it. If some piece of software needs to be run on my computer,
    I'm the one who executes it. I hate "automated surprises".

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autorun#Pressing_the_Shift_key

    In terms of your hard drive, it is also possible to put multiple
    partitions on the drive, and have one of the partitions hold your AV installers.
    The exact method you use to do that, will depend on what tools you have at
    hand. Your idea, of using the USB, is probably easier to do.

    The tricky part of your plan, is knowing whether the files on the USB drive
    are clean or not, before you use them (after all, you had "Virut" and it
    is supposed to attack *all* the exe files). If a file is small enough, you can
    upload it to virustotal.com . Otherwise, you might still benefit from
    some other scanning mechanism at your disposal. For me, if I wanted to
    do a reinstall, it means I might be using the services of some other
    boot environment, as part of preparing for the reinstallation. (The
    theory being, that the other boot environment is not infected, so that
    a scan could be carried out, files uploaded to virustotal, partitions
    prepared and so on.) I have a stack of CDs here, 5 inches high, which
    I use for that purpose (many different Linux distros, standalone AV
    scanners and so on). I can prepare fresh FAT32 or NTFS partitions,
    format them, all from Linux. And download a clean tool using a web
    browser etc.

    If the AV tool you're using is good enough, it might be sufficient to just
    get it to execute, and it could take care of any of the weaker pests. When
    I downloaded the trial version of Kaspersky, it managed to do that, but it
    took a lot of reboots before things settled down. It must have taken about
    three hours, before the whole episode was over. Not all pests are that
    easy to shake.

    Paul
     
  13. Rob Graham

    Rob Graham Flightless Bird

    I had a similar problem with my Acer. So I hooked it up the Crucial
    website where I got a system report, including the likely effect of
    upgrading the memory. I went for a reasonable but not complete upgrade
    and the computer's fine now. Cost me about £40.

    Rob Graham
     
  14. HeyBub

    HeyBub Flightless Bird

    20100216 wrote:
    > HeyBub wrote:
    >>
    >> 20100216 wrote:
    >>> Ignore everything you have read on this topic so far because there
    >>> is no simple solution to slow systems over time.

    >>
    >> There certainly is.
    >>

    > Produce one if you know that works.


    I don't know of one, but that doesn't mean one doesn't exist! As Ronald
    Reagan said: "Those who think there are not simple solutions to complex
    problems just haven't tried hard enough."


    >>
    >> Balderdash. It's not the lack of maintenance that's the culprit,
    >> maintenance is designed to get fix the problems.

    >
    > what problems do you fix with maintenance? Is Slow machines
    > considered to be a problem?


    Rust. Slicing bologna. Gingivitis.

    >
    >> Yep. Confused.

    >
    > It is you who is confused. Get your boobs enlarged boy!.


    I thought about it. If I did, however, I'd stay home all day and play with
    them, getting nothing done at all.
     
  15. Searcher7

    Searcher7 Flightless Bird

    On Feb 17, 12:45 am, Paul <nos...@needed.com> wrote:
    > Searcher7 wrote:
    > > On Feb 15, 11:56 pm, Paul <nos...@needed.com> wrote:
    > >> Searcher7 wrote:
    > >>> I have a Dell XPS-Z 866Mhz Pentium 3, with 384mb and a 20Gig hard
    > >>> drive that I use for the web, and I've been having speed issues with
    > >>> my system that are worse than usual.
    > >>> Everything which includes loading pages from the internet, closing
    > >>> windows(if they close at all), switching between tabs, starting up
    > >>> apps, closing apps, etc. has become really sluggish.
    > >>> My DSL is slow to begin with and is not even as fast as dial-up was
    > >>> when I was using it over a decade ago.(But that is obviously a Verizon
    > >>> issue).
    > >>> I try to stay away from anti-virus apps and the like because they have
    > >>> traditionally made my system worse than it was before their
    > >>> installation and use.
    > >>> But this time I took a chance and installed AVG, and even
    > >>> SUPERAntiSpyware.
    > >>> They didn't seem to do much, but that AVG "Resident Shield alert"
    > >>> window pops up constantly. (Usually when I attempt to open a file).
    > >>> Many of which I can no longer open or they open with difficulty. For
    > >>> instance when I attempt to open mspaint I get a pop-up box that says
    > >>> Missing Shortcut". All this while the AVG "Resident Shield
    > >>> alert"(Multiple threat detection) windows list a variety of files that
    > >>> are supposed to be infected.(Usually by something called "Win32/
    > >>> Virut)." It seems like all of the files I have are infected. I can't
    > >>> open the calculator or the calender because they can't be found.
    > >>> I also can no longer open a text file from my desktop without the
    > >>> "Open with" box popping up.
    > >>> (Last month I had to do a reinstall after installing Avast because it
    > >>> made my system useless).
    > >>> It looks as though I'll have to reinstall XP again, but thought I'd
    > >>> ask for any ideas on how to keep these problems from occurring all
    > >>> over again.
    > >>> Thanks.
    > >>> Darren Harris
    > >>> Staten Island, New York.

    >
    > > Thanks.

    >
    > > When things get too complicated reinstalling Windows becomes the best
    > > option.

    >
    > > I had to install twice in one day last month because after the first
    > > installation I downloaded Avast. No other drives were connected to my
    > > pc. My pc kept freezing at the desktop after the Avast install.
    > > (Perhaps it was a bad install?).

    >
    > > What do you think of downloading Anti-Virus and anti-Malware apps to a
    > > USB micro drive, and then after installing Windows again, transferring
    > > the apps from the USB drives to the "C" drive, and then installing
    > > them before I connect to the internet?

    >
    > > Is this even possible?

    >
    > > Thanks.

    >
    > > Darren Harris
    > > Staten Island, New York.

    >
    > I would press and hold down the shift key, when plugging in the USB drive..
    > That is to prevent any autorun from happening. That is the only precaution I
    > can think of. (I'm worried about any malware, that could use Autorun as
    > a way to be awakened.) Note the warning here, that you would need to press
    > the shift key, until the thing is mounted and recognized. I should probably
    > have my system set up to have Autorun turned off entirely, because I have
    > no use for it. If some piece of software needs to be run on my computer,
    > I'm the one who executes it. I hate "automated surprises".
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autorun#Pressing_the_Shift_key
    >
    > In terms of your hard drive, it is also possible to put multiple
    > partitions on the drive, and have one of the partitions hold your AV installers.
    > The exact method you use to do that, will depend on what tools you have at
    > hand. Your idea, of using the USB, is probably easier to do.
    >
    > The tricky part of your plan, is knowing whether the files on the USB drive
    > are clean or not, before you use them (after all, you had "Virut" and it
    > is supposed to attack *all* the exe files). If a file is small enough, you can
    > upload it to virustotal.com . Otherwise, you might still benefit from
    > some other scanning mechanism at your disposal. For me, if I wanted to
    > do a reinstall, it means I might be using the services of some other
    > boot environment, as part of preparing for the reinstallation. (The
    > theory being, that the other boot environment is not infected, so that
    > a scan could be carried out, files uploaded to virustotal, partitions
    > prepared and so on.) I have a stack of CDs here, 5 inches high, which
    > I use for that purpose (many different Linux distros, standalone AV
    > scanners and so on). I can prepare fresh FAT32 or NTFS partitions,
    > format them, all from Linux. And download a clean tool using a web
    > browser etc.
    >
    > If the AV tool you're using is good enough, it might be sufficient to just
    > get it to execute, and it could take care of any of the weaker pests. When
    > I downloaded the trial version of Kaspersky, it managed to do that, but it
    > took a lot of reboots before things settled down. It must have taken about
    > three hours, before the whole episode was over. Not all pests are that
    > easy to shake.
    >
    >     Paul


    OK. I've re-installed Windows XP. Now I have to figure out how to get
    the files back from the unplugged "D" drive and also the three USB
    flash drives I have.

    Of ocurse I'd have to assume they are infected, but is there an easy
    way to transfer my needed files back to "C" without the virus also?

    (After re-installation of Windows XP I installed Avast! and Zone
    Alarm).

    Thanks.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
     
  16. 20100218

    20100218 Flightless Bird

    Searcher7 wrote:
    >
    >
    > OK. I've re-installed Windows XP.


    Very good. You have at last decided not to follow Pig-Bear with his
    non-working, non-tested solutions. He is a Scum-Sucking Pig as far as
    users of this NG are concerned.


    > Of ocurse I'd have to assume they are infected, but is there an easy
    > way to transfer my needed files back to "C" without the virus also?


    They may not be infected but it is always a good idea to be careful I
    suggest scan the files with Avast you have recently installed (assuming
    it is fully updated) and when you get all clear, you can copy the files
    back on to your hard disk.

    >
    > (After re-installation of Windows XP I installed Avast! and Zone
    > Alarm).



    I am not fond of Zone Alarm because that software may be the culprit to
    corrupt windows installation. They are giving away a free software for
    something you don't know about. They are not as big as M$ to work for
    nothing! Avast is a good Anti-Virus software but you should also
    install Microsoft's MSE as a fail-back solution.

    hth
     
  17. Searcher7

    Searcher7 Flightless Bird

    On Feb 18, 4:40 pm, 20100218 <20100...@20100218.NET> wrote:
    > Searcher7 wrote:
    >
    > > OK. I've re-installed Windows XP.

    >
    > Very good.  You have at last decided not to follow Pig-Bear with his
    > non-working, non-tested solutions.  He is a Scum-Sucking Pig as far as
    > users of this NG are concerned.
    >
    > > Of ocurse I'd have to assume they are infected, but is there an easy
    > > way to transfer my needed files back to "C" without the virus also?

    >
    > They may not be infected but it is always a good idea to be careful  I
    > suggest scan the files with Avast you have recently installed (assuming
    > it is fully updated) and when you get all clear, you can copy the files
    > back on to your hard disk.
    >
    >
    >
    > > (After re-installation of Windows XP I installed Avast! and Zone
    > > Alarm).

    >
    > I am not fond of Zone Alarm because that software may be the culprit to
    > corrupt windows installation.  They are giving away a free software for
    > something you don't know about.  They are not as big as M$ to work for
    > nothing!  Avast is a good Anti-Virus software but you should also
    > install Microsoft's MSE as a fail-back solution.
    >
    > hth


    Weird. Zone Alarm is the one system maintenance app that I've never
    had problems with.

    The new installation is all clean after running Avast!

    But I'm sure the file on the other drives are not virus free because
    those are the drives I had to back up to.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
     
  18. Robert Macy

    Robert Macy Flightless Bird

    On Feb 18, 11:56 am, Searcher7 <Search...@mail.con2.com> wrote:
    ....snip...
    > OK. I've re-installed Windows XP. Now I have to figure out how to get
    > the files back from the unplugged "D" drive and also the three USB
    > flash drives I have.
    >
    > Of ocurse I'd have to assume they are infected, but is there an easy
    > way to transfer my needed files back to "C" without the virus also?
    >
    > (After re-installation of Windows XP I installed Avast! and Zone
    > Alarm).
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten Island, New York.


    Apologies for the jump in, but how can a *.txt, or a *.bmp or a *.doc
    or a *.xls etc be infected? I thought they were just data files and
    as long as the doc and xls don't have macros there can't be any
    potential for a virus. Have these files always had the potential to
    carry malwares and virii?

    Isn't it still possible to ctrl-alt-del and look at what is running
    and 'see' if something took over?

    Or, do the new forms 'say' they're legitmate applications when they're
    not?
     
  19. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Feb 18, 5:01 pm, Searcher7 <Search...@mail.con2.com> wrote:
    > On Feb 18, 4:40 pm, 20100218 <20100...@20100218.NET> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Searcher7 wrote:

    >
    > > > OK. I've re-installed Windows XP.

    >
    > > Very good.  You have at last decided not to follow Pig-Bear with his
    > > non-working, non-tested solutions.  He is a Scum-Sucking Pig as far as
    > > users of this NG are concerned.

    >
    > > > Of ocurse I'd have to assume they are infected, but is there an easy
    > > > way to transfer my needed files back to "C" without the virus also?

    >
    > > They may not be infected but it is always a good idea to be careful  I
    > > suggest scan the files with Avast you have recently installed (assuming
    > > it is fully updated) and when you get all clear, you can copy the files
    > > back on to your hard disk.

    >
    > > > (After re-installation of Windows XP I installed Avast! and Zone
    > > > Alarm).

    >
    > > I am not fond of Zone Alarm because that software may be the culprit to
    > > corrupt windows installation.  They are giving away a free software for
    > > something you don't know about.  They are not as big as M$ to work for
    > > nothing!  Avast is a good Anti-Virus software but you should also
    > > install Microsoft's MSE as a fail-back solution.

    >
    > > hth

    >
    > Weird. Zone Alarm is the one system maintenance app that I've never
    > had problems with.
    >
    > The new installation is all clean after running Avast!
    >
    > But I'm sure the file on the other drives are not virus free because
    > those are the drives I had to back up to.
    >
    > Darren Harris
    > Staten Island, New York.


    I would run MBAM and SAS as well.

    No single application knows about everything and those are my
    favorites this week.
     
  20. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Feb 18, 7:47 pm, Jose <jose_e...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On Feb 18, 5:01 pm, Searcher7 <Search...@mail.con2.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Feb 18, 4:40 pm, 20100218 <20100...@20100218.NET> wrote:

    >
    > > > Searcher7 wrote:

    >
    > > > > OK. I've re-installed Windows XP.

    >
    > > > Very good.  You have at last decided not to follow Pig-Bear with his
    > > > non-working, non-tested solutions.  He is a Scum-Sucking Pig as faras
    > > > users of this NG are concerned.

    >
    > > > > Of ocurse I'd have to assume they are infected, but is there an easy
    > > > > way to transfer my needed files back to "C" without the virus also?

    >
    > > > They may not be infected but it is always a good idea to be careful  I
    > > > suggest scan the files with Avast you have recently installed (assuming
    > > > it is fully updated) and when you get all clear, you can copy the files
    > > > back on to your hard disk.

    >
    > > > > (After re-installation of Windows XP I installed Avast! and Zone
    > > > > Alarm).

    >
    > > > I am not fond of Zone Alarm because that software may be the culprit to
    > > > corrupt windows installation.  They are giving away a free softwarefor
    > > > something you don't know about.  They are not as big as M$ to work for
    > > > nothing!  Avast is a good Anti-Virus software but you should also
    > > > install Microsoft's MSE as a fail-back solution.

    >
    > > > hth

    >
    > > Weird. Zone Alarm is the one system maintenance app that I've never
    > > had problems with.

    >
    > > The new installation is all clean after running Avast!

    >
    > > But I'm sure the file on the other drives are not virus free because
    > > those are the drives I had to back up to.

    >
    > > Darren Harris
    > > Staten Island, New York.

    >
    > I would run MBAM and SAS as well.
    >
    > No single application knows about everything and those are my
    > favorites this week.


    Forgot the links:

    Download, install, update and do a full scan with these free malware
    detection programs:

    Malwarebytes (MBAM): http://malwarebytes.org/
    SUPERAntiSpyware: (SAS): http://www.superantispyware.com/

    They can be uninstalled later if desired.
     

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