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utility that can delete files

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Gomez, Jun 17, 2010.

  1. Gomez

    Gomez Flightless Bird

    Does anyone knows a utility that can delete files recursively from a folder?
    I used so far the dos command line "del /S *" but I prefer a Windows
    utility
    Regards
    Gomez
     
  2. Bob I

    Bob I Flightless Bird

    Del is a Windows utility, perhaps you meant something with a GUI?

    Gomez wrote:
    > Does anyone knows a utility that can delete files recursively from a folder?
    > I used so far the dos command line "del /S *" but I prefer a Windows
    > utility
    > Regards
    > Gomez
    >
    >
     
  3. Db

    Db Flightless Bird

    there are utilities that
    wipe the disk of deleted files.

    however, there are differing
    opinions whether wiping
    deleted files with something
    like military encryption
    is effective against
    hard drive forensics.

    my opinion and a old friend
    who is an m.i.t professor
    is that the only sure way that
    the contents on the disk are
    not retrievable is to toss the
    hard drive into a volcano or
    the middle of ocean in the
    middle of the night.
    --
    --
    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>

    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    This NNTP newsgroup is evolving to:

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/default.aspx


    "Gomez" <gomez@automail.com> wrote in message
    news:ed#YIijDLHA.5436@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Does anyone knows a utility that can delete files recursively from a
    > folder?
    > I used so far the dos command line "del /S *" but I prefer a Windows
    > utility
    > Regards
    > Gomez
    >
     
  4. Mike S

    Mike S Flightless Bird

    On 6/17/2010 11:10 AM, Db wrote:
    > there are utilities that
    > wipe the disk of deleted files.
    >
    > however, there are differing
    > opinions whether wiping
    > deleted files with something
    > like military encryption
    > is effective against
    > hard drive forensics.
    >
    > my opinion and a old friend
    > who is an m.i.t professor
    > is that the only sure way that
    > the contents on the disk are
    > not retrievable is to toss the
    > hard drive into a volcano or
    > the middle of ocean in the
    > middle of the night.


    I saw a show on television that mentioned some very powerful forensic
    software that could find the last two (that's right 2) sets of files on
    a hdd that had been overwritten. That is you save file A, then you
    overwrite it with file B. Then you overwrite that with file C. They
    could recover B and A with extremely high rates of accuracy!!!

    But most people do not have access to that software.

    I agree though that if you want 100% security - take the drive apart and
    bend/smash the platters...

    OT addendum... and while you're ati it grab the neodymium magnets,
    they're the strongest fixed magnets made and they're awesome. I've had
    some that were strong enough to cling to one another through my hand, so
    when I held my hand out horizontally and rotated the palm up or down the
    magnets didn't fall off! And if you stick them together it's really hard
    to get them apart.

    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/23018...ymium_magnet_by_tj_with_www_videopatent_info/

    Mike
     
  5. Anthony Buckland

    Anthony Buckland Flightless Bird

    "Mike S" <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:hve5g3$ng3$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > On 6/17/2010 11:10 AM, Db wrote:
    >> there are utilities that
    >> wipe the disk of deleted files.
    >>
    >> however, there are differing
    >> opinions whether wiping
    >> deleted files with something
    >> like military encryption
    >> is effective against
    >> hard drive forensics.
    >>
    >> my opinion and a old friend
    >> who is an m.i.t professor
    >> is that the only sure way that
    >> the contents on the disk are
    >> not retrievable is to toss the
    >> hard drive into a volcano or
    >> the middle of ocean in the
    >> middle of the night.

    >
    > I saw a show on television that mentioned some very powerful forensic
    > software that could find the last two (that's right 2) sets of files on a
    > hdd that had been overwritten. That is you save file A, then you overwrite
    > it with file B. Then you overwrite that with file C. They could recover B
    > and A with extremely high rates of accuracy!!!
    >
    > But most people do not have access to that software.
    >
    > I agree though that if you want 100% security - take the drive apart and
    > bend/smash the platters...


    I'm in the middle of securely disposing of a failed
    hard drive (the failure of which condemns to death
    a truly old machine that was reduced to performing
    a few chores in the basement). I have the platters,
    have read that any commonly used metal reaches
    its Curie temperature and demagnetizes at heats
    readily reached with propane torches or in the
    depths of a briquette barbecue, and plan to roast
    the platters in such a fire I will soon have access
    to. Let CTU get something out of _them_!
     
  6. Mike S

    Mike S Flightless Bird

    <snip>
    > I'm in the middle of securely disposing of a failed
    > hard drive (the failure of which condemns to death
    > a truly old machine that was reduced to performing
    > a few chores in the basement). I have the platters,
    > have read that any commonly used metal reaches
    > its Curie temperature and demagnetizes at heats
    > readily reached with propane torches or in the
    > depths of a briquette barbecue, and plan to roast
    > the platters in such a fire I will soon have access
    > to. Let CTU get something out of _them_!


    LOL. What is CTU?
     
  7. John John - MVP

    John John - MVP Flightless Bird

    Mike S wrote:
    > On 6/17/2010 11:10 AM, Db wrote:
    >> there are utilities that
    >> wipe the disk of deleted files.
    >>
    >> however, there are differing
    >> opinions whether wiping
    >> deleted files with something
    >> like military encryption
    >> is effective against
    >> hard drive forensics.
    >>
    >> my opinion and a old friend
    >> who is an m.i.t professor
    >> is that the only sure way that
    >> the contents on the disk are
    >> not retrievable is to toss the
    >> hard drive into a volcano or
    >> the middle of ocean in the
    >> middle of the night.

    >
    > I saw a show on television that mentioned some very powerful forensic
    > software that could find the last two (that's right 2) sets of files on
    > a hdd that had been overwritten. That is you save file A, then you
    > overwrite it with file B. Then you overwrite that with file C. They
    > could recover B and A with extremely high rates of accuracy!!!
    >
    > But most people do not have access to that software.


    Most people don't have access to that software because it just plain
    doesn't exist, it's nothing but BS!

    John
     
  8. Mike S

    Mike S Flightless Bird

    On 6/18/2010 4:39 AM, John John - MVP wrote:
    > Mike S wrote:
    >> On 6/17/2010 11:10 AM, Db wrote:
    >>> there are utilities that
    >>> wipe the disk of deleted files.
    >>>
    >>> however, there are differing
    >>> opinions whether wiping
    >>> deleted files with something
    >>> like military encryption
    >>> is effective against
    >>> hard drive forensics.
    >>>
    >>> my opinion and a old friend
    >>> who is an m.i.t professor
    >>> is that the only sure way that
    >>> the contents on the disk are
    >>> not retrievable is to toss the
    >>> hard drive into a volcano or
    >>> the middle of ocean in the
    >>> middle of the night.

    >>
    >> I saw a show on television that mentioned some very powerful forensic
    >> software that could find the last two (that's right 2) sets of files
    >> on a hdd that had been overwritten. That is you save file A, then you
    >> overwrite it with file B. Then you overwrite that with file C. They
    >> could recover B and A with extremely high rates of accuracy!!!
    >>
    >> But most people do not have access to that software.

    >
    > Most people don't have access to that software because it just plain
    > doesn't exist, it's nothing but BS!
    >
    > John


    And you know this how?
     
  9. Anthony Buckland

    Anthony Buckland Flightless Bird

    "Mike S" <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:hveu94$d69$2@news.eternal-september.org...
    > <snip>
    >> I'm in the middle of securely disposing of a failed
    >> hard drive (the failure of which condemns to death
    >> a truly old machine that was reduced to performing
    >> a few chores in the basement). I have the platters,
    >> have read that any commonly used metal reaches
    >> its Curie temperature and demagnetizes at heats
    >> readily reached with propane torches or in the
    >> depths of a briquette barbecue, and plan to roast
    >> the platters in such a fire I will soon have access
    >> to. Let CTU get something out of _them_!

    >
    > LOL. What is CTU?


    In the recently deceased TV show "24", the fictional
    CTU, the CounterTerrorism Unit, was frequently faced
    with computing resources (usually laptop or desktop
    hard drives) which had been intentionally or occasionally
    accidentally damaged before being captured from various
    terrorist organizations. Their software and particularly
    their personnel were legendary in being able to recover
    just enough data to carry on a complex confrontation
    with the baddies, but usually not close to enough data
    to achieve a decisive victory. They tended to do better
    as the end of each season approached, particularly
    once the always-present mole trying to advance the
    baddie cause in CTU headquarters had been detected.
     
  10. John John - MVP

    John John - MVP Flightless Bird

    Mike S wrote:
    > On 6/18/2010 4:39 AM, John John - MVP wrote:
    >> Mike S wrote:
    >>> On 6/17/2010 11:10 AM, Db wrote:
    >>>> there are utilities that
    >>>> wipe the disk of deleted files.
    >>>>
    >>>> however, there are differing
    >>>> opinions whether wiping
    >>>> deleted files with something
    >>>> like military encryption
    >>>> is effective against
    >>>> hard drive forensics.
    >>>>
    >>>> my opinion and a old friend
    >>>> who is an m.i.t professor
    >>>> is that the only sure way that
    >>>> the contents on the disk are
    >>>> not retrievable is to toss the
    >>>> hard drive into a volcano or
    >>>> the middle of ocean in the
    >>>> middle of the night.
    >>>
    >>> I saw a show on television that mentioned some very powerful forensic
    >>> software that could find the last two (that's right 2) sets of files
    >>> on a hdd that had been overwritten. That is you save file A, then you
    >>> overwrite it with file B. Then you overwrite that with file C. They
    >>> could recover B and A with extremely high rates of accuracy!!!
    >>>
    >>> But most people do not have access to that software.

    >>
    >> Most people don't have access to that software because it just plain
    >> doesn't exist, it's nothing but BS!
    >>
    >> John

    >
    > And you know this how?


    You are the one who made the claim that there is some sort of 'magic'
    software available that can recover overwritten files, it is up to you
    to substantiate your claim and supply the name of the software and the
    company who makes this software. The leading forensic recovery software
    (EnCase) cannot do this and none of the major data recovery firms can do
    this, just call them and ask them and you will get the same answer from
    all of them. This idea that data could be recovered from overwritten
    drives was a theory advanced by Dr. Peter Gutmann and he himself has
    told me that his theory was misconstrued by many who read his paper, he
    was never able to recover overwritten files and he knows of no one who
    ever was.

    John
     
  11. John John - MVP

    John John - MVP Flightless Bird

    Anthony Buckland wrote:
    > "Mike S" <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:hveu94$d69$2@news.eternal-september.org...
    >> <snip>
    >>> I'm in the middle of securely disposing of a failed
    >>> hard drive (the failure of which condemns to death
    >>> a truly old machine that was reduced to performing
    >>> a few chores in the basement). I have the platters,
    >>> have read that any commonly used metal reaches
    >>> its Curie temperature and demagnetizes at heats
    >>> readily reached with propane torches or in the
    >>> depths of a briquette barbecue, and plan to roast
    >>> the platters in such a fire I will soon have access
    >>> to. Let CTU get something out of _them_!

    >> LOL. What is CTU?

    >
    > In the recently deceased TV show "24", the fictional
    > CTU, the CounterTerrorism Unit, was frequently faced
    > with computing resources (usually laptop or desktop
    > hard drives) which had been intentionally or occasionally
    > accidentally damaged before being captured from various
    > terrorist organizations. Their software and particularly
    > their personnel were legendary in being able to recover
    > just enough data to carry on a complex confrontation
    > with the baddies, but usually not close to enough data
    > to achieve a decisive victory. They tended to do better
    > as the end of each season approached, particularly
    > once the always-present mole trying to advance the
    > baddie cause in CTU headquarters had been detected.


    LOL, in other words this whole notion of recovering overwritten data is
    nothing but fiction! The same kind of nonsense happens on other shows
    like CSI, some people see these fictional TV shows and they think that
    the forensic tools and techniques shown in these shows are real!

    John
     
  12. db

    db Flightless Bird

    yeah,
    I agree.

    in fact, the wiping utilities
    don't overwrite the physical
    data in the disk sectors.

    users believe that the physical
    data in the disk sectors/clusters
    are over written by "umph" number
    of times by the wiping utilities.

    when it is only the multiple
    regions in the fat that are
    are overwritten by "umph"
    number of times by the
    utilities.

    --
    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    - Systems Analyst
    - Database Developer
    - Accountancy
    - Veteran of the Armed Forces
    - @Hotmail.com
    - nntp Postologist
    ~ "share the nirvana" - dbZen

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    >
    >


    "Mike S" <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:hve5g3$ng3$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > On 6/17/2010 11:10 AM, Db wrote:
    >> there are utilities that
    >> wipe the disk of deleted files.
    >>
    >> however, there are differing
    >> opinions whether wiping
    >> deleted files with something
    >> like military encryption
    >> is effective against
    >> hard drive forensics.
    >>
    >> my opinion and a old friend
    >> who is an m.i.t professor
    >> is that the only sure way that
    >> the contents on the disk are
    >> not retrievable is to toss the
    >> hard drive into a volcano or
    >> the middle of ocean in the
    >> middle of the night.

    >
    > I saw a show on television that mentioned some very powerful forensic
    > software that could find the last two (that's right 2) sets of files on a
    > hdd that had been overwritten. That is you save file A, then you overwrite
    > it with file B. Then you overwrite that with file C. They could recover B
    > and A with extremely high rates of accuracy!!!
    >
    > But most people do not have access to that software.
    >
    > I agree though that if you want 100% security - take the drive apart and
    > bend/smash the platters...
    >
    > OT addendum... and while you're ati it grab the neodymium magnets, they're
    > the strongest fixed magnets made and they're awesome. I've had some that
    > were strong enough to cling to one another through my hand, so when I held
    > my hand out horizontally and rotated the palm up or down the magnets
    > didn't fall off! And if you stick them together it's really hard to get
    > them apart.
    >
    > http://www.metacafe.com/watch/23018...ymium_magnet_by_tj_with_www_videopatent_info/
    >
    > Mike
     
  13. Bob I

    Bob I Flightless Bird

    This one overwrites the clusters that contained the file
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897443.aspx
    I would surmise the others do likewise.

    db wrote:
    > yeah,
    > I agree.
    >
    > in fact, the wiping utilities
    > don't overwrite the physical
    > data in the disk sectors.
    >
    > users believe that the physical
    > data in the disk sectors/clusters
    > are over written by "umph" number
    > of times by the wiping utilities.
    >
    > when it is only the multiple
    > regions in the fat that are
    > are overwritten by "umph"
    > number of times by the
    > utilities.
    >
     
  14. John John - MVP

    John John - MVP Flightless Bird

    db wrote:

    > in fact, the wiping utilities
    > don't overwrite the physical
    > data in the disk sectors.


    Of course they do, they overwrite every sector on the disk, including
    cluster tips. If the wiping utility doesn't do this then it is
    completely useless!

    John
     
  15. Bill in Co.

    Bill in Co. Flightless Bird

    John John - MVP wrote:
    > db wrote:
    >
    >> in fact, the wiping utilities
    >> don't overwrite the physical
    >> data in the disk sectors.

    >
    > Of course they do, they overwrite every sector on the disk, including
    > cluster tips. If the wiping utility doesn't do this then it is
    > completely useless!
    >
    > John


    :)
    Hoopiehead alert???
     
  16. John John - MVP

    John John - MVP Flightless Bird

    Bill in Co. wrote:
    > John John - MVP wrote:
    >> db wrote:
    >>
    >>> in fact, the wiping utilities
    >>> don't overwrite the physical
    >>> data in the disk sectors.

    >> Of course they do, they overwrite every sector on the disk, including
    >> cluster tips. If the wiping utility doesn't do this then it is
    >> completely useless!
    >>
    >> John

    >
    > :)
    > Hoopiehead alert???


    well, db and his grasp (or imagination) of how things work...
     
  17. Db

    Db Flightless Bird

    the mechanics of clusters
    do not work the way you
    think they should.

    there is a lot of data in
    between the clusters and

    lots more in orphaned clusters
    allocated to files that utilize
    multiple clusters.

    wiping utilities are ineffective
    and the rule of thumb is to
    "destroy" the hard drive.

    sounds like the brooklyn
    bridge you bought is in need
    of repairs.


    --
    --
    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>

    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    This NNTP newsgroup is evolving to:

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/default.aspx


    "Bill in Co." <not_really_here@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:#i2uAawDLHA.5784@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > John John - MVP wrote:
    >> db wrote:
    >>
    >>> in fact, the wiping utilities
    >>> don't overwrite the physical
    >>> data in the disk sectors.

    >>
    >> Of course they do, they overwrite every sector on the disk, including
    >> cluster tips. If the wiping utility doesn't do this then it is
    >> completely useless!
    >>
    >> John

    >
    > :)
    > Hoopiehead alert???
    >
    >
     
  18. Mike S

    Mike S Flightless Bird

    On 6/18/2010 7:10 AM, John John - MVP wrote:
    >
    > Mike S wrote:
    >> On 6/18/2010 4:39 AM, John John - MVP wrote:
    >>> Mike S wrote:
    >>>> On 6/17/2010 11:10 AM, Db wrote:
    >>>>> there are utilities that
    >>>>> wipe the disk of deleted files.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> however, there are differing
    >>>>> opinions whether wiping
    >>>>> deleted files with something
    >>>>> like military encryption
    >>>>> is effective against
    >>>>> hard drive forensics.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> my opinion and a old friend
    >>>>> who is an m.i.t professor
    >>>>> is that the only sure way that
    >>>>> the contents on the disk are
    >>>>> not retrievable is to toss the
    >>>>> hard drive into a volcano or
    >>>>> the middle of ocean in the
    >>>>> middle of the night.
    >>>>
    >>>> I saw a show on television that mentioned some very powerful forensic
    >>>> software that could find the last two (that's right 2) sets of files
    >>>> on a hdd that had been overwritten. That is you save file A, then you
    >>>> overwrite it with file B. Then you overwrite that with file C. They
    >>>> could recover B and A with extremely high rates of accuracy!!!
    >>>>
    >>>> But most people do not have access to that software.
    >>>
    >>> Most people don't have access to that software because it just plain
    >>> doesn't exist, it's nothing but BS!
    >>>
    >>> John

    >>
    >> And you know this how?

    >
    > You are the one who made the claim that there is some sort of 'magic'
    > software available that can recover overwritten files, it is up to you
    > to substantiate your claim and supply the name of the software and the
    > company who makes this software. The leading forensic recovery software
    > (EnCase) cannot do this and none of the major data recovery firms can do
    > this, just call them and ask them and you will get the same answer from
    > all of them. This idea that data could be recovered from overwritten
    > drives was a theory advanced by Dr. Peter Gutmann and he himself has
    > told me that his theory was misconstrued by many who read his paper, he
    > was never able to recover overwritten files and he knows of no one who
    > ever was.
    > John


    I claimed that I saw this on a television show, that is true. They did
    not mention the name of the software. Also the government often has
    technology that is years ahead of what the public knows about. I have
    not seen this at work but I now damage platters on drives I don't want
    people to access anything from, and I advise the same to all of my friends.

    You also made a claim, that it doesn't exist, so how can you be
    uncomfortable if someone asks you to back up your claim?

    Mike
     
  19. John John - MVP

    John John - MVP Flightless Bird

    The smallest storage unit is a a sector and clusters are groups of
    sectors. Poorly designed wiping utilities wipe 'files' and do not
    bother with cluster tips (unused sectors within clusters). Good wiping
    utilities overwrite *every* sector (including cluster tips and unused
    clusters), as a matter of fact few wiping utilities in use today would
    work otherwise. Your understanding of how disk wiping works is feeble
    to say the least, securely wiped data is unrecoverable by any means.

    John


    Db wrote:
    > the mechanics of clusters
    > do not work the way you
    > think they should.
    >
    > there is a lot of data in
    > between the clusters and
    >
    > lots more in orphaned clusters
    > allocated to files that utilize
    > multiple clusters.
    >
    > wiping utilities are ineffective
    > and the rule of thumb is to
    > "destroy" the hard drive.
    >
    > sounds like the brooklyn
    > bridge you bought is in need
    > of repairs.
    >
    >
     
  20. John John - MVP

    John John - MVP Flightless Bird

    Mike S wrote:
    > On 6/18/2010 7:10 AM, John John - MVP wrote:
    >>
    >> Mike S wrote:
    >>> On 6/18/2010 4:39 AM, John John - MVP wrote:
    >>>> Mike S wrote:
    >>>>> On 6/17/2010 11:10 AM, Db wrote:
    >>>>>> there are utilities that
    >>>>>> wipe the disk of deleted files.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> however, there are differing
    >>>>>> opinions whether wiping
    >>>>>> deleted files with something
    >>>>>> like military encryption
    >>>>>> is effective against
    >>>>>> hard drive forensics.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> my opinion and a old friend
    >>>>>> who is an m.i.t professor
    >>>>>> is that the only sure way that
    >>>>>> the contents on the disk are
    >>>>>> not retrievable is to toss the
    >>>>>> hard drive into a volcano or
    >>>>>> the middle of ocean in the
    >>>>>> middle of the night.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I saw a show on television that mentioned some very powerful forensic
    >>>>> software that could find the last two (that's right 2) sets of files
    >>>>> on a hdd that had been overwritten. That is you save file A, then you
    >>>>> overwrite it with file B. Then you overwrite that with file C. They
    >>>>> could recover B and A with extremely high rates of accuracy!!!
    >>>>>
    >>>>> But most people do not have access to that software.
    >>>>
    >>>> Most people don't have access to that software because it just plain
    >>>> doesn't exist, it's nothing but BS!
    >>>>
    >>>> John
    >>>
    >>> And you know this how?

    >>
    >> You are the one who made the claim that there is some sort of 'magic'
    >> software available that can recover overwritten files, it is up to you
    >> to substantiate your claim and supply the name of the software and the
    >> company who makes this software. The leading forensic recovery software
    >> (EnCase) cannot do this and none of the major data recovery firms can do
    >> this, just call them and ask them and you will get the same answer from
    >> all of them. This idea that data could be recovered from overwritten
    >> drives was a theory advanced by Dr. Peter Gutmann and he himself has
    >> told me that his theory was misconstrued by many who read his paper, he
    >> was never able to recover overwritten files and he knows of no one who
    >> ever was.
    >> John

    >
    > I claimed that I saw this on a television show, that is true. They did
    > not mention the name of the software. Also the government often has
    > technology that is years ahead of what the public knows about. I have
    > not seen this at work but I now damage platters on drives I don't want
    > people to access anything from, and I advise the same to all of my friends.
    >
    > You also made a claim, that it doesn't exist, so how can you be
    > uncomfortable if someone asks you to back up your claim?


    For a period of about five years, on and off in my spare time, I did a
    lot of searching for this 'Holy Grail' of data recovery! Anytime that
    it would appear that promising information was about to be found it
    always came down to the same thing; quotes from or claims made on the
    basis of Dr, Gutmann's paper or hearsay about conspiracies and
    government secrets! I found out that the one thing in common that any
    who claimed that this was possible have is that none of them could give
    hard evidence or give us the name of anyone or any company who could
    actually do it, classic hallmarks of urban myths!

    After countless hours of futile searching for this data recovery Grail I
    decided to ask persons and companies in the know about data recovery, I
    started e-mailing and calling those who I thought would be able to
    provide real answers. I contacted at least 10 different data recovery
    companies, some who make data recovery software and some who run clean
    room data recovery. All of them told me the same thing, they cannot
    recover overwritten data. Quoting from an email from one of the major
    firms: "It is nothing but a theory at best, add secret government
    capabilities and the theory has now entered the realm of urban legends".

    The claim that governments have tools to do this is often used to
    bolster the myth but it is interesting to note that in his 2004 paper,
    Recovering Unrecoverable Data - The Need for Drive-Independant Data
    Recovery, Charles H. Sobey wrote:

    "It is very telling that the US Department of Defense's Combating
    Terrorism Technology Support Office placed a "Broad Agency
    Announcement" seeking just such a [magic] machine for damaged, erased,
    or overwritten media."

    The DoD's request went unanswered, no one took them up on it. In a
    telephone conversation I posed the question about the DoD's request to
    an engineer at Seagate. The engineer chuckled and said that while he
    was not privy to any information about these kind of projects within his
    company he nonetheless felt that to undertake the request would have
    been an exercise in futility.

    Finally, after all of the data recovery and hard disk manufacturers that
    I had contacted told me that it was impossible to recover overwritten
    data I decided to ask Dr. Gutmann himself about it. His answers to me
    confirmed the urban myth status of the whole thing.

    You can read Charles H. Sobey's paper here:

    ActionFront Research
    Recovering Unrecoverable Data - The Need for Drive-Independant Data Recovery
    http://www.actionfront.com/ts_whitepaper.aspx

    Dr. Gutmann's paper is available here:
    http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/secure_del.html


    More on the subject in these links:

    Data Removal and Erasure from Hard Disk Drives
    http://www.actionfront.com/ts_dataremoval.aspx#Overwriting

    Overwritten data: Why even the Secret Service can't get it back
    http://blogs.computerworld.com/node/5756

    Is overwritten data really unrecoverable?
    http://blogs.computerworld.com/node/5687

    Can Intelligence Agencies Read Overwritten Data?
    http://www.nber.org/sys-admin/overwritten-data-guttman.html

    Researchers Prove Single Pass Overwrite Effective
    https://infosecurity.us/?p=5474

    John
     

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