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USB Port not detected

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Jag Chan, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. Jag Chan

    Jag Chan Flightless Bird

    My nephew bought a used computer with Windows XP installed.

    But when he tried to use pen drive it wouldn't work.

    He received a message that USB port not detected.

    He tried all the USB port available in the machine.

    Help in this reegard will be of great help'

    Thanks.
     
  2. Shenan Stanley

    Shenan Stanley Flightless Bird

    Jag Chan wrote:
    > My nephew bought a used computer with Windows XP installed.
    >
    > But when he tried to use pen drive it wouldn't work.
    >
    > He received a message that USB port not detected.
    >
    > He tried all the USB port available in the machine.
    >
    > Help in this reegard will be of great help'



    First - used computer: format and install the OS yourself. You cannot be
    sure what is on there otherwise.

    Second - download and install all the drivers from the individual hardware
    component manufacturer's web pages.

    - Motherboard Chipset
    - Video device(s)
    - Audio Device(s)
    - Network Device(s)

    Etc.

    --
    Shenan Stanley
    MS-MVP
    --
    How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
     
  3. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Jag Chan wrote:
    > My nephew bought a used computer with Windows XP installed.
    >
    > But when he tried to use pen drive it wouldn't work.
    >
    > He received a message that USB port not detected.
    >
    > He tried all the USB port available in the machine.
    >
    > Help in this reegard will be of great help'
    >
    > Thanks.


    It helps if you can copy the *exact* text of the error message.

    *******

    To check the USB controllers in the computer, look in Device
    Manager. You can get there via

    Start : Run : devmgmt.msc

    This article shows what types of entries should be present.

    http://www.usbman.com/Guides/checking_for_usb_2.htm

    There is an example here, of a computer with on-board USB ports,
    as well as a separate PCI USB2 card installed in a PCI slot on
    the motherboard.

    http://www.usbman.com/Guides/checki5.jpg

    These entries are for Intel USB 1.1 - there are four entries
    capable of controlling up to eight USB ports.

    Intel(R) 82801EB USB Universal Host Controller- 24Dx

    The "Standard Enhanced PCI to USB Host controller", would be
    for the onboard ports, and handles USB2 speed operation.

    The three NEC entries, include two Open Host Controller entries
    (for controlling up to four ports at USB 1.1 speeds). And
    a NEC Enhanced Host Controller entry, controlling those same
    four ports, when they're running at USB 2.0 speeds.

    In any case, that amounts to "detecting USB".

    *******

    The plugged in device, will result in separate entries in Device
    Manager. Storage devices would be USB Mass Storage class.

    For any plugged in hardware, Windows prefers to use Plug and Play
    logic. The newly plugged in device, presents VEN/DEV/SUBSYS info,
    which are three sets of numbers to identify the device.

    For USB devices, you can use this utility, to see that information
    as it comes from the USB device. First, execute UVCView.x86.exe
    and there will be a window displaying the USB controller entries.
    When a USB device is plugged in, it should show up in the Window.
    Clicking on the entry on the left, should show a whole bunch of
    information on the right. If some endpoints form properly, as
    seen on the right, then the device may be detected.

    ftp://ftp.efo.ru/pub/ftdichip/Utilities/UVCView.x86.exe
    http://www.users.on.net/~fzabkar/USB_IDs/UVCView.x86.exe

    File size is 167,232 bytes.
    MD5sum is 93244d84d79314898e62d21cecc4ca5e

    This is a picture of what the UVCView info looks like.

    http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png

    Some information on the parameters seen in UVCView.

    http://www.beyondlogic.org/usbnutshell/usb5.htm

    You can see the results of Windows attempts to install
    the newly detected device, by looking in the

    C:/WINDOWS\setupapi.log

    file. The entries at the end, should show what happened. You
    could have a look in there, and see what the system response
    was.

    There is one motherboard chip, which is notorious for failure.
    The Intel ICH5/ICH5R Southbridge, has USB1.1/USB2 capable ports
    on it. That chip can fail with something resembling a latchup
    failure, leading in extreme cases, to a burn mark on the chip.
    When there is a less severe failure (same failure mechanism),
    the Device Manager entries are all there, but the physical layer
    is damaged, and a plugged in USB peripheral, cannot "reach" the
    motherboard logic. In that failure case, there is no response
    at all, in any manner, when a USB device is plugged in.
    Purchasing a PCI USB2 plug-in card, can be used to replace the
    ports, without having to replace the motherboard. (And if you
    own a motherboard with ICH5/ICH5R, you can also use such a
    card, to avoid ever plugging devices into those motherboard
    ports. The failure mechanism seems to be related to electrostatic
    discharge into the ports.)

    (A burned ICH5 - this computer will no longer boot. Less spectacular
    failures show no burn mark, but all the USB ports are dead. The
    part number printed on top of this chip is 82801EB or 82801ER.
    There is normally no heatsink on top of it, so the part number
    can easily be read, with the right light source pointed at it.
    Intel has not admitted to a design fault.)

    http://onfinite.com/libraries/179057/2ea.jpg

    In any case, start with Device Manager, and see if you have
    USB 1.1 controller or USB 2.0 controller entries. The activities
    on the ports, can be displayed with UVCView, that is, if the
    ports are electrically functional. If you have a burned ICH5 or
    ICH5R chip, there would be no response at all, when a USB
    device is plugged in.

    In many cases, the problem is some information stored in the
    registry. This procedure can be used, if the problem is
    some kind of confusion with the records that the OS is keeping.
    Many USB devices have electronic serial numbers, which allows
    the OS to detect when a device is plugged into a different port.
    Sometimes, the info associated with a particular entry is
    damaged, and subsequent insertions of the device no longer
    work right. You can try this procedure, to attempt to fix
    such a problem. (There is a script to do this as well, but
    being a powerful script, I tend to consider this manual method
    to be a bit safer. At least, as long as you're only attacking
    USB entries.) The OS will "rediscover" the USB controllers
    on the next reboot, and refresh all the entries of this
    type in Device Manager.

    http://www.usbman.com/Guides/Cleanup Device Manager Safe Mode.htm

    Paul
     
  4. PA Bear [MS MVP]

    PA Bear [MS MVP] Flightless Bird

    What Shenan said.

    Jag Chan wrote:
    > My nephew bought a used computer with Windows XP installed.
    >
    > But when he tried to use pen drive it wouldn't work.
    >
    > He received a message that USB port not detected.
    >
    > He tried all the USB port available in the machine.
    >
    > Help in this reegard will be of great help'
    >
    > Thanks.
     
  5. Doum

    Doum Flightless Bird

    Jag Chan <rup@invalid.com> écrivait news:4c4ce4e8$0$280$14726298
    @news.sunsite.dk:

    > My nephew bought a used computer with Windows XP installed.
    >
    > But when he tried to use pen drive it wouldn't work.
    >
    > He received a message that USB port not detected.
    >
    > He tried all the USB port available in the machine.
    >
    > Help in this reegard will be of great help'
    >
    > Thanks.


    What Shenan said and be sure to get the XP key before formatting if there
    is no COA sticker on the computer case and/or you don't have the key
    documented somewhere.

    This program will show you the Windows key and other usefull infos.

    http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html

    HTH
     

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