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Upgrading Win2000 to XP

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com, Apr 2, 2010.

  1. I have been running Win2000Pro for years. I really dont want to
    upgrade, but I am seeing more and more things that do not run on 2K
    anymore. I do not have the hardware to run Win7, and wont go near
    Vista for any reason. I guess XP is my only choice. I have no
    intention to buy another computer.

    The problem I am having is understanding the activation. First off, I
    would guess the only way I can buy XP now, is a used copy from ebay or
    something like that. BUt can I activate a used copy? And even if I
    was able to find an unopened new copy. what happens if MS abandons XP,
    which I have a feeling they will do soon, just like they did with 2K
    and 95 and 98. Will they still activate it, or is buying XP now just
    a waste of money.

    One of the main reasons I never upgraded was because of that
    activation. I know that changing hardware invalidates it, and I am
    always adding new hardware, change the motherboard if I get a deal on
    a more powerful one, and whenever I get a faster (older) computer, I
    often move my harddrive (with all my data) to the newer computer.
    Doing this was easy with Win98, and I have done it with Win2k, but it
    takes a little more fussing around. I heard that this is not possible
    with XP, mostly because of the activation.

    With this in mind, does this mean I will have to buy a new copy of XP
    everytime I do a major upgrade of my hardware, and reactivate
    everytime I do a minor upgrade? This all sounds like a big hassle,
    which I am not all that willing to do, not to mention the fact that I
    do not like giving out personal information to ANY company, in this
    day and age of identity theft. But it looks like I have no other
    choice other than getting a Macintosh computer, or installing Linux
    (neither which I want to do).

    Is there any way around this? Is there any version of XP, or "hack"
    that eliminates the need to activate? I'm not trying to get XP for
    free, but at the same time I am not pleased about being treated like a
    criminal by MS.

    When I say "upgrade" I do not mean to actually "upgrade 2K". I intend
    to keep 2K and dual boot to XP. Presently I dual boot to 98se and
    2Kpro, but I'll move 98 to another computer, since I dont think it's
    possible to triple boot.
     
  2. DL

    DL Flightless Bird

    If you buy a retail version of winxp, from a valid supplier, you can install
    / activate as often as necessary.
    If an oem version, then its locked to the original hardware.
    If you change a motherboard you would need to run a repair installation of
    winxp and install the new drivers
    Winxp is coming to the end of its support lifecycle

    Personally I couldn't see any need or purpose to dual boot win2k and winxp,
    unless you have some hardware only supported by win2k. All the software I
    had under win2k ran fine on winxp

    <mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com> wrote in message
    news:cm0cr5pihijuoq0gonr6tvri7f7g4t4n4v@4ax.com...
    > I have been running Win2000Pro for years. I really dont want to
    > upgrade, but I am seeing more and more things that do not run on 2K
    > anymore. I do not have the hardware to run Win7, and wont go near
    > Vista for any reason. I guess XP is my only choice. I have no
    > intention to buy another computer.
    >
    > The problem I am having is understanding the activation. First off, I
    > would guess the only way I can buy XP now, is a used copy from ebay or
    > something like that. BUt can I activate a used copy? And even if I
    > was able to find an unopened new copy. what happens if MS abandons XP,
    > which I have a feeling they will do soon, just like they did with 2K
    > and 95 and 98. Will they still activate it, or is buying XP now just
    > a waste of money.
    >
    > One of the main reasons I never upgraded was because of that
    > activation. I know that changing hardware invalidates it, and I am
    > always adding new hardware, change the motherboard if I get a deal on
    > a more powerful one, and whenever I get a faster (older) computer, I
    > often move my harddrive (with all my data) to the newer computer.
    > Doing this was easy with Win98, and I have done it with Win2k, but it
    > takes a little more fussing around. I heard that this is not possible
    > with XP, mostly because of the activation.
    >
    > With this in mind, does this mean I will have to buy a new copy of XP
    > everytime I do a major upgrade of my hardware, and reactivate
    > everytime I do a minor upgrade? This all sounds like a big hassle,
    > which I am not all that willing to do, not to mention the fact that I
    > do not like giving out personal information to ANY company, in this
    > day and age of identity theft. But it looks like I have no other
    > choice other than getting a Macintosh computer, or installing Linux
    > (neither which I want to do).
    >
    > Is there any way around this? Is there any version of XP, or "hack"
    > that eliminates the need to activate? I'm not trying to get XP for
    > free, but at the same time I am not pleased about being treated like a
    > criminal by MS.
    >
    > When I say "upgrade" I do not mean to actually "upgrade 2K". I intend
    > to keep 2K and dual boot to XP. Presently I dual boot to 98se and
    > 2Kpro, but I'll move 98 to another computer, since I dont think it's
    > possible to triple boot.
    >
    >
     
  3. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 02 Apr 2010 08:45:32 -0600, mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com
    wrote:


    > One of the main reasons I never upgraded was because of that
    > activation. I know that changing hardware invalidates it,



    That is *not* correct. You can change hardware as much as and as often
    as you need to or want to. With a retail version you can even move it
    to a completely different computer. The only restriction is that it
    can not be on more than one computer at once.

    With an OEM version, you may not put it on a different computer, but
    you can still change components as often as you need to or want to.


    > and I am
    > always adding new hardware, change the motherboard if I get a deal on
    > a more powerful one,



    Fine.


    > and whenever I get a faster (older) computer, I
    > often move my harddrive (with all my data) to the newer computer.



    Then stay away from an OEM copy. But a retail copy is fine for you.


    > Doing this was easy with Win98, and I have done it with Win2k, but it
    > takes a little more fussing around. I heard that this is not possible
    > with XP, mostly because of the activation.
    >
    > With this in mind, does this mean I will have to buy a new copy of XP
    > everytime I do a major upgrade of my hardware,



    No.


    > and reactivate everytime I do a minor upgrade?



    No. Reactivation is required only if enough changes within several
    months. But reactivation is very easy and should not scare you away.

    In my view, going to XP these days makes no sense at all, and Windows
    7 is a far better choice now. But you can do whatever you want, and
    your concerns over XP are not justified.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  4. John Doue

    John Doue Flightless Bird

    On 4/2/2010 5:45 PM, mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com wrote:
    > I have been running Win2000Pro for years. I really dont want to
    > upgrade, but I am seeing more and more things that do not run on 2K
    > anymore. I do not have the hardware to run Win7, and wont go near
    > Vista for any reason. I guess XP is my only choice. I have no
    > intention to buy another computer.
    >
    > The problem I am having is understanding the activation. First off, I
    > would guess the only way I can buy XP now, is a used copy from ebay or
    > something like that. BUt can I activate a used copy? And even if I
    > was able to find an unopened new copy. what happens if MS abandons XP,
    > which I have a feeling they will do soon, just like they did with 2K
    > and 95 and 98. Will they still activate it, or is buying XP now just
    > a waste of money.
    >
    > One of the main reasons I never upgraded was because of that
    > activation. I know that changing hardware invalidates it, and I am
    > always adding new hardware, change the motherboard if I get a deal on
    > a more powerful one, and whenever I get a faster (older) computer, I
    > often move my harddrive (with all my data) to the newer computer.
    > Doing this was easy with Win98, and I have done it with Win2k, but it
    > takes a little more fussing around. I heard that this is not possible
    > with XP, mostly because of the activation.
    >
    > With this in mind, does this mean I will have to buy a new copy of XP
    > everytime I do a major upgrade of my hardware, and reactivate
    > everytime I do a minor upgrade? This all sounds like a big hassle,
    > which I am not all that willing to do, not to mention the fact that I
    > do not like giving out personal information to ANY company, in this
    > day and age of identity theft. But it looks like I have no other
    > choice other than getting a Macintosh computer, or installing Linux
    > (neither which I want to do).
    >
    > Is there any way around this? Is there any version of XP, or "hack"
    > that eliminates the need to activate? I'm not trying to get XP for
    > free, but at the same time I am not pleased about being treated like a
    > criminal by MS.
    >
    > When I say "upgrade" I do not mean to actually "upgrade 2K". I intend
    > to keep 2K and dual boot to XP. Presently I dual boot to 98se and
    > 2Kpro, but I'll move 98 to another computer, since I dont think it's
    > possible to triple boot.
    >
    >

    Let me try to get to the bottom-line.

    You like to change your hardware? Why not buy a used desktop with XP on
    it? Since you are technically oriented, at least from a hardware
    standpoint, this would be the easiest and cheapest way to update both
    your hardware and OS.

    Then, inasmuch you become the legitimate owner of a licence, look at it
    this way: the requirement to activate is meant to prevent users from
    using the same OS on several machines, or even selling the OS to third
    parties. Since this is not what you intend to do ... I realize such
    phones calls are a nuisance, but do not expect people to tell you here
    how to hack you way around activation!

    Triple booting. Consider using defunct System Commander, still
    relatively easy to obtain I believe. I have personally not gone beyond
    double boot but I believe it is feasible.

    --
    John Doue
     
  5. philo

    philo Flightless Bird

    mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com wrote:
    > I have been running Win2000Pro for years. I really dont want to
    > upgrade, but I am seeing more and more things that do not run on 2K
    > anymore. I do not have the hardware to run Win7, and wont go near
    > Vista for any reason. I guess XP is my only choice. I have no
    > intention to buy another computer.
    >
    > The problem I am having is understanding the activation. First off, I
    > would guess the only way I can buy XP now, is a used copy from ebay or
    > something like that. BUt can I activate a used copy? And even if I
    > was able to find an unopened new copy. what happens if MS abandons XP,
    > which I have a feeling they will do soon, just like they did with 2K
    > and 95 and 98. Will they still activate it, or is buying XP now just
    > a waste of money.
    >
    > One of the main reasons I never upgraded was because of that
    > activation. I know that changing hardware invalidates it, and I am
    > always adding new hardware, change the motherboard if I get a deal on
    > a more powerful one, and whenever I get a faster (older) computer, I
    > often move my harddrive (with all my data) to the newer computer.
    > Doing this was easy with Win98, and I have done it with Win2k, but it
    > takes a little more fussing around. I heard that this is not possible
    > with XP, mostly because of the activation.
    >
    > With this in mind, does this mean I will have to buy a new copy of XP
    > everytime I do a major upgrade of my hardware, and reactivate
    > everytime I do a minor upgrade? This all sounds like a big hassle,
    > which I am not all that willing to do, not to mention the fact that I
    > do not like giving out personal information to ANY company, in this
    > day and age of identity theft. But it looks like I have no other
    > choice other than getting a Macintosh computer, or installing Linux
    > (neither which I want to do).
    >
    > Is there any way around this? Is there any version of XP, or "hack"
    > that eliminates the need to activate? I'm not trying to get XP for
    > free, but at the same time I am not pleased about being treated like a
    > criminal by MS.
    >
    > When I say "upgrade" I do not mean to actually "upgrade 2K". I intend
    > to keep 2K and dual boot to XP. Presently I dual boot to 98se and
    > 2Kpro, but I'll move 98 to another computer, since I dont think it's
    > possible to triple boot.
    >
    >




    You can in fact triple boot==>

    you'd need to make sure each OS is on it's own , separate partition.


    If you do plan to install XP and dual boot with win2k that's fine...
    and should present no problems....assuming your machine has enough RAM.

    To run XP well ...ideally you should have 512megs of ram or more
    and I'd say 256megs would be the absolute bare minimum.

    However before you add XP...
    I'm wondering if it's simply your browser that's become obsolete
    as IE6 (sp2?) is the highest version of Internet Explorer that you can
    run on Win2k


    You very well may be able to get a few more years out of your Win2k
    machine by simply using another browser such as Kmeleon

    http://www.afterdawn.com/software/network/browsers/k-meleon.cfm


    As to Win7...
    you'd need a new machine to run it...
    and for many people, that would not make much sense if your old hardware
    is presently doing the job
     
  6. On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 15:15:57 +0100, "DL" <invalid@nowhere.com> wrote:

    >If you buy a retail version of winxp, from a valid supplier, you can install
    >/ activate as often as necessary.
    >If an oem version, then its locked to the original hardware.


    OK, I was confused on that matter.

    >If you change a motherboard you would need to run a repair installation of
    >winxp and install the new drivers


    Thats about the same thing I have done with Win98, except it's more or
    less done manually.

    >Winxp is coming to the end of its support lifecycle


    Yep, I know that, but my hardware still works and I am unable to
    afford a new computer, when I can get used ones for next to nothing
    and swap parts. Seems my homemade computers are always a few years
    behind, but they work, and for my needs, even Win98 still works fine,
    except that they keep changing stuff to force us to upgrade.
    Althought I am booted to Win98 right now, I upgraded to Win2000
    several years ago mostly for USB support, which 98 really lacks.

    The one question that was NOT answered is what happens when MS stops
    supporting XP. Will they stop activating it too? Will that force all
    XP users to buy new computers to get Win7 or whatever is the newest?

    Does anyone know for sure what MS plans to do about activating XP when
    it's no longer supported? With MS Dos, Win3.x. Win9.x and Win2k, it
    did not matter. As long as the user has a valid registration number
    it can still be installed, whether supported or not. But with XP and
    Vista, what will happen when MS stops supporting it, in regards to
    activation? It seems like a time bomb waiting to go off. Lets say
    that MS decides that on July 1, 2010 MS stops supporting XP, and on
    July 10 my hard drive fails. I'm screwed if I cant reinstall XP on a
    new hard drive due to a lack of activation.

    We're constantly being told to care for our environment, yet MS and
    other companies keep making our hardware obsolete, which fills
    landfills with still usable computers. This irks me. Sure I suppose
    I could run Linux, but if lots of people do that, isn't that
    counterproductive to MS, who wants our sales?

    >Personally I couldn't see any need or purpose to dual boot win2k and winxp,
    >unless you have some hardware only supported by win2k. All the software I
    >had under win2k ran fine on winxp
    >


    I guess I only want to do that because I do not like going to a new OS
    and having to relearn it, when I have the "familiar old friend" to
    use. Some days using a new OS is exciting, other days I just want to
    USE the computer, and not fuss around with learning it. The more I
    think about it, I might be better off dual booting Win98 and XP. I
    have hundreds of applications installed in Win98, and I'm so used to
    it that I seem to boot to 98 more than 2K. In 2K I only have repeats
    of the programs from 98, mostly just browsers and internet stuff.
    Most of my personal programs are still run from Win98, only because
    they have been installed there for 12 years. To be honest. I am not a
    real fan of upgrading anything. If the software I am using works for
    my needs, why do I want to upgrade. It's just like when I do home
    repairs, I still like my dirty old hammer with the crack in the
    handle better than the brand new ones, just because it "feels right".
    Possibly just part of my getting old and set in my ways too.

    ><mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com> wrote in message
    >news:cm0cr5pihijuoq0gonr6tvri7f7g4t4n4v@4ax.com...
    >> I have been running Win2000Pro for years. I really dont want to
    >> upgrade, but I am seeing more and more things that do not run on 2K
    >> anymore. I do not have the hardware to run Win7, and wont go near
    >> Vista for any reason. I guess XP is my only choice. I have no
    >> intention to buy another computer.
    >>
    >> The problem I am having is understanding the activation. First off, I
    >> would guess the only way I can buy XP now, is a used copy from ebay or
    >> something like that. BUt can I activate a used copy? And even if I
    >> was able to find an unopened new copy. what happens if MS abandons XP,
    >> which I have a feeling they will do soon, just like they did with 2K
    >> and 95 and 98. Will they still activate it, or is buying XP now just
    >> a waste of money.
    >>
    >> One of the main reasons I never upgraded was because of that
    >> activation. I know that changing hardware invalidates it, and I am
    >> always adding new hardware, change the motherboard if I get a deal on
    >> a more powerful one, and whenever I get a faster (older) computer, I
    >> often move my harddrive (with all my data) to the newer computer.
    >> Doing this was easy with Win98, and I have done it with Win2k, but it
    >> takes a little more fussing around. I heard that this is not possible
    >> with XP, mostly because of the activation.
    >>
    >> With this in mind, does this mean I will have to buy a new copy of XP
    >> everytime I do a major upgrade of my hardware, and reactivate
    >> everytime I do a minor upgrade? This all sounds like a big hassle,
    >> which I am not all that willing to do, not to mention the fact that I
    >> do not like giving out personal information to ANY company, in this
    >> day and age of identity theft. But it looks like I have no other
    >> choice other than getting a Macintosh computer, or installing Linux
    >> (neither which I want to do).
    >>
    >> Is there any way around this? Is there any version of XP, or "hack"
    >> that eliminates the need to activate? I'm not trying to get XP for
    >> free, but at the same time I am not pleased about being treated like a
    >> criminal by MS.
    >>
    >> When I say "upgrade" I do not mean to actually "upgrade 2K". I intend
    >> to keep 2K and dual boot to XP. Presently I dual boot to 98se and
    >> 2Kpro, but I'll move 98 to another computer, since I dont think it's
    >> possible to triple boot.
    >>
    >>
     
  7. On Fri, 02 Apr 2010 20:09:41 +0300, John Doue <notwobe@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >On 4/2/2010 5:45 PM, mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com wrote:
    >> I have been running Win2000Pro for years. I really dont want to
    >> upgrade, but I am seeing more and more things that do not run on 2K
    >> anymore. I do not have the hardware to run Win7, and wont go near
    >> Vista for any reason. I guess XP is my only choice. I have no
    >> intention to buy another computer.
    >>
    >> The problem I am having is understanding the activation. First off, I
    >> would guess the only way I can buy XP now, is a used copy from ebay or
    >> something like that. BUt can I activate a used copy? And even if I
    >> was able to find an unopened new copy. what happens if MS abandons XP,
    >> which I have a feeling they will do soon, just like they did with 2K
    >> and 95 and 98. Will they still activate it, or is buying XP now just
    >> a waste of money.
    >>
    >> One of the main reasons I never upgraded was because of that
    >> activation. I know that changing hardware invalidates it, and I am
    >> always adding new hardware, change the motherboard if I get a deal on
    >> a more powerful one, and whenever I get a faster (older) computer, I
    >> often move my harddrive (with all my data) to the newer computer.
    >> Doing this was easy with Win98, and I have done it with Win2k, but it
    >> takes a little more fussing around. I heard that this is not possible
    >> with XP, mostly because of the activation.
    >>
    >> With this in mind, does this mean I will have to buy a new copy of XP
    >> everytime I do a major upgrade of my hardware, and reactivate
    >> everytime I do a minor upgrade? This all sounds like a big hassle,
    >> which I am not all that willing to do, not to mention the fact that I
    >> do not like giving out personal information to ANY company, in this
    >> day and age of identity theft. But it looks like I have no other
    >> choice other than getting a Macintosh computer, or installing Linux
    >> (neither which I want to do).
    >>
    >> Is there any way around this? Is there any version of XP, or "hack"
    >> that eliminates the need to activate? I'm not trying to get XP for
    >> free, but at the same time I am not pleased about being treated like a
    >> criminal by MS.
    >>
    >> When I say "upgrade" I do not mean to actually "upgrade 2K". I intend
    >> to keep 2K and dual boot to XP. Presently I dual boot to 98se and
    >> 2Kpro, but I'll move 98 to another computer, since I dont think it's
    >> possible to triple boot.
    >>
    >>

    >Let me try to get to the bottom-line.
    >
    >You like to change your hardware? Why not buy a used desktop with XP on
    >it? Since you are technically oriented, at least from a hardware
    >standpoint, this would be the easiest and cheapest way to update both
    >your hardware and OS.
    >

    I guess you got a point. While this computer (Pentium III 1000mhz
    with 512 Ram and 80g harddrive) is sufficient, I was considering a
    larger harddrive. I can not add more Ram, since 512 is the limit.\
    So, if I can find a used XP computer for a good price, with hopefully
    a larger harddrive, and comes with XP, I'd be happy, and I could leave
    this computer for my Win98 and Win2K operations, as well as storage,
    since over 50% of my harddrive is nothing but storage of photos,
    music, and older downloads. So, if I add the cost of a retail version
    of XP plus the cost of a larger harddrive, I might be ahead.

    >Then, inasmuch you become the legitimate owner of a licence, look at it
    >this way: the requirement to activate is meant to prevent users from


    So, lets say I do buy a used computer with XP installed. Isn't that
    installation licensed to someone else during activation? Lets say
    that the former owner was named John Doe. I buy the computer and
    after a few months I need to reactivate because of a harddrive
    failure. Lets say my name is Bob Smith. Won't MS tell me that this
    copy of XP is licensed to John Doe, and I can not activate it?

    From that thought comes another question. Lets say that my neighbor
    just bought a brand new computer with Windows7. His former computer,
    which ran XP went up in smoke. He does not plan to ever use XP again,
    and sells me the CD with the registration number (retail version).
    Considering that particular copy of XP is no longer in use on anyones
    computer, can I legally become the owner and activate it?

    >using the same OS on several machines, or even selling the OS to third
    >parties. Since this is not what you intend to do ... I realize such
    >phones calls are a nuisance, but do not expect people to tell you here
    >how to hack you way around activation!


    I can understand that, and I am not trying to get an illegal copy.
    But at the same time, if XP is soon to become obsolete or unsupported,
    I do not want to spend a lot of money on it. I'm sure there are lots
    of no longer copies floating around because people have upgraded to
    Vista or Win7. If I can get one of them for a fair price that is the
    way I'll go, (IF I CAN ACTIVATE IT)....... Unless I do as above and
    get another computer complete with XP.

    And, one last question. You said a person can not use the same OS on
    several machines. Does that mean even if these machines belong to the
    same person? For example, if I have a desktop computer, and a laptop
    computer, I would need two copies of XP to install them on both
    computers? And what happens if I am building a spare computer and
    just want to do a test install of XP to verify if it works. Do I need
    to purchase yet another copy, just to test things out? I ask this
    because over the years, I have built many computers from spare parts,
    installed Win95 or 98, or 2K, ran them for a few days to be sure they
    worked properly, then formatted the drive and sold the computer. It
    seems like this could not be done with XP, which makes me ask what the
    computer repair shops do? They must buy more copies of XP or Vista
    than anyone else and must be activating all the time...... Or is there
    some special DEMO package made for their uses?

    >Triple booting. Consider using defunct System Commander, still
    >relatively easy to obtain I believe. I have personally not gone beyond
    >double boot but I believe it is feasible.


    I recall hearing that name some years ago.
    I always have at least 8 partitions anyhow. I like having separate
    partitions for different operations and/or storage. Makes for quicker
    defragmentation too. I also have Partition Magic, and that allows for
    resizing and moving partitions.

    In some ways, this computer is semi-triple booting. I have the choice
    to boot to Dos, or to Win2000. (yea, I still use Dos). In Dos mode,
    I just type WIN and I start Win98.
     
  8. Doum

    Doum Flightless Bird

    mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com écrivait
    news:s2sdr5d37hdng09n8qlq6uo60oi4f3eo0b@4ax.com:


    <snip>
    >
    > So, lets say I do buy a used computer with XP installed. Isn't that
    > installation licensed to someone else during activation? Lets say
    > that the former owner was named John Doe. I buy the computer and
    > after a few months I need to reactivate because of a harddrive
    > failure. Lets say my name is Bob Smith. Won't MS tell me that this
    > copy of XP is licensed to John Doe, and I can not activate it?
    >



    When you activate XP, no personnal information (such as name) is used
    only the key number. XP is licensed to a computer, not a person.


    > From that thought comes another question. Lets say that my neighbor
    > just bought a brand new computer with Windows7. His former computer,
    > which ran XP went up in smoke. He does not plan to ever use XP again,
    > and sells me the CD with the registration number (retail version).
    > Considering that particular copy of XP is no longer in use on anyones
    > computer, can I legally become the owner and activate it?


    Yes

    <snip>

    > I can understand that, and I am not trying to get an illegal copy.
    > But at the same time, if XP is soon to become obsolete or unsupported,
    > I do not want to spend a lot of money on it. I'm sure there are lots
    > of no longer copies floating around because people have upgraded to
    > Vista or Win7. If I can get one of them for a fair price that is the
    > way I'll go, (IF I CAN ACTIVATE IT)....... Unless I do as above and
    > get another computer complete with XP.
    >


    MS has said that if they stop activating XP, they will issue a patch that
    will allows to use XP without activation "for the eternity".

    For now, you will be able to activate even an OEM copy if it's a generic
    MS CD (not branded like Dell, Acer, HP, Sony, etc.), Using an OEM copy
    that way is illegal by the EULA (contract) but since it will activate I
    don't think MS will take you to court.

    > And, one last question. You said a person can not use the same OS on
    > several machines.



    It has always been like that, but before XP, MS didn't check


    > Does that mean even if these machines belong to the
    > same person? For example, if I have a desktop computer, and a laptop
    > computer, I would need two copies of XP to install them on both
    > computers?


    Yes. But I must add that laptops usually come with Windows preinstalled
    so there is a license tied to them. Check the bottom of the laptop, there
    should be a Microsoft sticker with a license key on it.

    Let's say someone gives you a laptop with a failed harddrive, you can
    replace the hard drive, and reinstall XP using an MS generic OEM CD that
    matches the type and language of XP (Home or Pro) on the sticker (legal
    to copy only the CD)

    And what happens if I am building a spare computer and
    > just want to do a test install of XP to verify if it works. Do I need
    > to purchase yet another copy, just to test things out?


    No need to buy another copy. You have 30 days to activate before XP stops
    working, that gives you plenty time to test your hardware.
     
  9. On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 10:54:25 -0700, Doum <me@domain.net> wrote:

    >mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com écrivait
    >news:s2sdr5d37hdng09n8qlq6uo60oi4f3eo0b@4ax.com:
    >
    >
    ><snip>
    >>
    >> So, lets say I do buy a used computer with XP installed. Isn't that
    >> installation licensed to someone else during activation? Lets say
    >> that the former owner was named John Doe. I buy the computer and
    >> after a few months I need to reactivate because of a harddrive
    >> failure. Lets say my name is Bob Smith. Won't MS tell me that this
    >> copy of XP is licensed to John Doe, and I can not activate it?
    >>

    >
    >
    >When you activate XP, no personnal information (such as name) is used
    >only the key number. XP is licensed to a computer, not a person.
    >
    >
    >> From that thought comes another question. Lets say that my neighbor
    >> just bought a brand new computer with Windows7. His former computer,
    >> which ran XP went up in smoke. He does not plan to ever use XP again,
    >> and sells me the CD with the registration number (retail version).
    >> Considering that particular copy of XP is no longer in use on anyones
    >> computer, can I legally become the owner and activate it?

    >
    >Yes
    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >> I can understand that, and I am not trying to get an illegal copy.
    >> But at the same time, if XP is soon to become obsolete or unsupported,
    >> I do not want to spend a lot of money on it. I'm sure there are lots
    >> of no longer copies floating around because people have upgraded to
    >> Vista or Win7. If I can get one of them for a fair price that is the
    >> way I'll go, (IF I CAN ACTIVATE IT)....... Unless I do as above and
    >> get another computer complete with XP.
    >>

    >
    >MS has said that if they stop activating XP, they will issue a patch that
    >will allows to use XP without activation "for the eternity".
    >


    OK, that's cool. I feel better about the whole thing now. At least
    MS shows they care once and awhile. After all, many of us have older
    computers and just can not use Vista or Win7. And in my case I have
    no need to use Vista or higher. It's only a home computer for going
    online and running a few home apps. Aside from the computer geeks and
    power game users, or some huge corporation, I see no need to run
    anything above XP. Even my Win98 and/or Win2k are satisfactory,
    except that we are being forced to upgrade by websites and hardware
    makers. For example, if I go on youtube now, I am told that both IE6
    and the last ver of Firefox that will run on Win98, are obsolete.
    This really ticks me off. I have been using youtube for years and it
    always worked fine. Why do they do this? It operates the exact same
    way when I use Firefox 3.x in Win2000. Of course part of the blame
    goes to Firefox for now supplying a ver 3 browser for Win98.

    >For now, you will be able to activate even an OEM copy if it's a generic
    >MS CD (not branded like Dell, Acer, HP, Sony, etc.), Using an OEM copy
    >that way is illegal by the EULA (contract) but since it will activate I
    >don't think MS will take you to court.


    This is one spot where I am still puzzled. Lets say I buy an OEM CD
    on ebay or craigslist. How do I know if its branded? Does it say for
    example (DELL) on the cd itself, or on the CD packaging? If I buy it
    from my neighbor, I can return it, but not likely on an online
    auction. So I want to be sure that I get one I can use. My computers
    are always "no name" generic ones I build from spare parts. The one
    I'm using right now has an IBM motherboard, but everything else has
    been changed.
    >
    >> And, one last question. You said a person can not use the same OS on
    >> several machines.

    >
    >
    >It has always been like that, but before XP, MS didn't check
    >
    >
    >> Does that mean even if these machines belong to the
    >> same person? For example, if I have a desktop computer, and a laptop
    >> computer, I would need two copies of XP to install them on both
    >> computers?

    >
    >Yes. But I must add that laptops usually come with Windows preinstalled
    >so there is a license tied to them. Check the bottom of the laptop, there
    >should be a Microsoft sticker with a license key on it.
    >

    OK, I bought my 12 year old laptop at a used computer store AS-IS. It
    came with no hard drive. I bought a hard drive and installed it. It
    has a sticker on it for Win98 and I installed 98 and used the license
    key number on that sticker, rather than re-use the same number for the
    Win98 installed on my desktop. However, I had to upgrade to Win2000
    on the laptop because my add-on Wifi card would not work on anything
    less than Win2000. A friend gave me his old no longer needed copy of
    Win2K, so I was all set. But that eliminated the license key on the
    computer. I would not even try to install XP on that laptop, too
    slow, too little ram.

    >Let's say someone gives you a laptop with a failed harddrive, you can
    >replace the hard drive, and reinstall XP using an MS generic OEM CD that
    >matches the type and language of XP (Home or Pro) on the sticker (legal
    >to copy only the CD)
    >
    > And what happens if I am building a spare computer and
    >> just want to do a test install of XP to verify if it works. Do I need
    >> to purchase yet another copy, just to test things out?

    >
    >No need to buy another copy. You have 30 days to activate before XP stops
    >working, that gives you plenty time to test your hardware.
    >


    OK, I thought the activation needed to happen immediately. That means
    I can test out the computer, then reformat the HD and let the new
    owner install their own OS. That solves that.

    Thanks for the help.
     
  10. Doum

    Doum Flightless Bird

    mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com écrivait
    news:29uir515vcrbb3qr50jses3tm8eknmgmfl@4ax.com:

    > On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 10:54:25 -0700, Doum <me@domain.net> wrote:
    >
    >>mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com écrivait
    >>news:s2sdr5d37hdng09n8qlq6uo60oi4f3eo0b@4ax.com:

    <snip>
    >
    > This is one spot where I am still puzzled. Lets say I buy an OEM CD
    > on ebay or craigslist. How do I know if its branded? Does it say for
    > example (DELL) on the cd itself, or on the CD packaging? If I buy it
    > from my neighbor, I can return it, but not likely on an online
    > auction. So I want to be sure that I get one I can use. My computers
    > are always "no name" generic ones I build from spare parts. The one
    > I'm using right now has an IBM motherboard, but everything else has
    > been changed.


    <snip>

    The brand will be written on the CD but some branded reinstallation CDs
    bring back the computer the way it was when it left the factory with all
    the drivers, specific softwares like backups and CD burning and some demo
    softwares already installed, those don't need activation but only work with
    specific models.

    I just checked on Ebay and there are some Dell branded CDs that the seller
    claims they are full installation and will work on any computer, but if I
    were you I would rather buy it from a place like this instead of ebay.

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_2_10?url=search-alias%
    3Dsoftware&field-keywords=windows+xp+home+edition&sprefix=windows+xp

    HTH
     
  11. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 05 Apr 2010 00:50:51 -0500, mister_friendly@the-newzgroups.com
    wrote:

    > This is one spot where I am still puzzled. Lets say I buy an OEM CD
    > on ebay or craigslist. How do I know if its branded? Does it say for
    > example (DELL) on the cd itself, or on the CD packaging? If I buy it
    > from my neighbor, I can return it, but not likely on an online
    > auction. So I want to be sure that I get one I can use. My computers
    > are always "no name" generic ones I build from spare parts. The one
    > I'm using right now has an IBM motherboard, but everything else has
    > been changed.



    Your choice, of course, but if it were me, I would never choose to buy
    an operating system CD from either of those sources. The risk of
    getting cheated is too great.

    Moreover, I recommend against getting an OEM copy of XP. Although if
    you get a complete generic OEM version, it contains the same software,
    it has the following disadvantages as compared with the retail
    version:

    1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's
    installed on. It can never legally be moved to another computer, sold,
    or given away (except with the original computer). If the computer
    dies or is stolen, your license to use XP dies with it.

    2. It can only do a clean installation, not an upgrade.

    3. Microsoft provides no support for OEM versions. You can't call them
    with a problem, but instead have to get any needed support from your
    OEM; that support may range anywhere between good and non-existent. Or
    you can get support elsewhere, such as in these newsgroups.

    Point number 1, above, is the deal-breaker, as far as I'm concerned.
    You're much better off buying a retail Upgrade copy for only slightly
    more money. And Upgrade copies can do clean installations if you have
    a qualifying previous version's CD to show it when prompted.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     

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