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transferring files from "un-bootable" laptop

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by brubaker325, Jun 13, 2010.

  1. brubaker325

    brubaker325 Flightless Bird

    Geek Squad tells me the motherboard on my laptop has failed. As a result, I
    can't boot it up. How do I get the files transferred out to another laptop
    or desktop? Neither of which is new.
    Thanks.
     
  2. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    brubaker325 wrote:
    > Geek Squad tells me the motherboard on my laptop has failed. As a
    > result, I can't boot it up. How do I get the files transferred out
    > to another laptop or desktop? Neither of which is new.
    > Thanks.


    I'd be wary of anything Geek Squad tells you.

    If the motherboard has truly failed, you should remove the hard drive
    and connect it to another PC. One way to do this is to use a USB
    enclosure. Then just use Windows Explorer to copy your files.
     
  3. PA Bear [MS MVP]

    PA Bear [MS MVP] Flightless Bird

    "Daave" wrote:
    >> Geek Squad tells me the motherboard on my laptop has failed. As a
    >> result, I can't boot it up. How do I get the files transferred out
    >> to another laptop or desktop? Neither of which is new.
    >> Thanks.

    >
    > I'd be wary of anything Geek Squad tells you...


    +1

    Run, do not walk, away from Geek Squad/Best Buy.
     
  4. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    brubaker325 wrote:
    > Geek Squad tells me the motherboard on my laptop has failed. As a result, I
    > can't boot it up. How do I get the files transferred out to another laptop
    > or desktop? Neither of which is new.
    > Thanks.


    When you remove the hard drive, it might have some kind of goofy adapter
    on the interface pins.

    Underneath that, if present, you'll either find a 44 pin IDE interface
    (suitable for a ribbon cable connector scheme). Or, you'll see a SATA
    interface, with a 7 contact data section and a 15 contact power section.

    That means, there would be two different kinds of external hard drive
    enclosures you could buy. Either a 2.5" SATA (newer) or a 2.5" IDE (older)
    enclosure.

    The enclosure electronics convert the drive interface to USB. You can
    then run a USB cable from the newly-enclosed hard drive, to some
    desktop computer with USB interface. When you plug in the drive, you
    should see the old C: partition from the laptop (plus any other
    partitions that might have existed on it). For 2.5" enclosures, the
    drive could end up being "bus powered" from the limited 500 milliamps
    available on the USB cable. (Sometimes, that isn't enough power to
    run the drive, which is why you may be back with that to report, the
    next time you post.)

    This is an example of a 2.5" enclosure, with 44 pin IDE interface for
    the drive.

    http://members2.jcom.home.ne.jp/bd.mutuki/img/2.5hdd2.jpg

    This enclosure isn't the right size, but is intended to show
    an internal SATA interface. The 7 contact section and 15 contact
    section are right next to each other. The drive snaps into that
    connector with some care. There might be room for a screw somewhere
    here, to keep the drive in place.

    http://www.addonics.com/products/Saturn/image/aassauscs_detail.gif

    *******

    In addition to enclosures, you can also get a "loose cable" adapter
    kit, intended for temporary setups. In the customer reviews for
    these, one of the issues with them, is the AC power adapters are
    so cheap now, they're failing and ruining hardware. Which is not
    a particularly encouraging sign.

    The adapter has connectors on three sides. This picture
    shows the 44 pin side of the adapter.

    http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/12-119-152-S02?$S640W$

    The 40 pin connector, for 3.5" desktop drives, is on this side.

    http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/12-119-152-S03?$S640W$

    The 7 pin SATA data connection, is on the end of the adapter.
    It is an "L" shaped hole.

    That means the adapter supports four different kinds of drives,
    2.5" IDE, 2.5" SATA, 3.5" IDE, 3.5" SATA. (The SATA drives use the
    same cabling as each other.) A separate power adapter and power cables,
    provide power for a couple of those device options. The 2.5" IDE
    may end up drawing power from the USB cable (again, which can cause
    issues with getting the drive to spin up and be readable).

    In this photo for a different product, you can see all the odds and
    ends you get in a kit. This kit is $20.

    http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/12-156-017-S06?$S640W$

    As with the external USB enclosures, those "loose cable" adapter
    kits also have USB interfaces. So the function is no different
    than the enclosure idea. If you didn't have any advance warning
    of the type of drive you were going to work on (i.e. a friend is
    bringing *some* kind of drive over), such a $20 kit
    prepares you for whatever happens to be inside the laptop.

    One difference is, the exposure of the bad power adapters
    that may accompany the adapter kit. If you read customer
    reviews, you can get some advanced warning of what to expect
    from a particular brand. The last enclosure I bought here,
    had its own AC adapter, and it has behaved quite nicely,
    neither getting hot nor blowing up. So it is possible for
    the Chinese to make good adapters.

    *******

    You can also connect hard drives, to an internal port inside your
    desktop computer. To connect a 44 pin IDE drive, you need a
    44 pin IDE to 40 pin IDE adapter. You can see a picture of one
    of those here.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812119245

    The purpose of that adapter, is to convert the 2mm center to center
    pins of a 2.5" laptop drive, to the 0.1" center to center spacing
    of a 40 pin desktop ribbon cable connector. The power plug shown in
    the picture, is a means of providing 5 volts to the hard drive.
    You would connect the power plug, to an available 1x4 Molex inside
    the computer.

    In this picture, it shows a 2.5" IDE drive with 44 pin connector,
    going through an adapter, and then being connected to the ribbon cable
    inside a desktop computer. They haven't connected their power connector
    yet, but have to, before it'll work.

    http://www.mocom.ru/Read/1_read/1_read_2.jpg

    If you could not get an external USB enclosure to work with the
    drive, you'd switch over to attempting to do it with an internal
    desktop computer connection. This normally requires taking the
    side panel off the computer. Some desktop computers use the
    "sandwich" packaging concept, where the machine tilts open via
    a hinge. And that is a damn nuisance to work on (I have an
    Apple Macintosh that works like that). I have to clear a
    space on the kitchen floor to work on that one. I have to be
    careful not to overstress the hinge or any cabling inside.

    The SATA version of the 2.5" drive, could be connected directly
    to a desktop computer. All you'd need is an available 7 contact data
    and 15 contact power cable (usually two separate cables). The laptop
    may have had an adapter clipped over top of the regular SATA interface,
    in case you can't figure out why you cannot connect to it. Any
    laptop adapter has to be removed first.

    This picture is to show you what a SATA connector on a 2.5" drive would
    look like. The connectors on this are compatible with desktop SATA
    wiring. (When hard drives get down to 1.8" size, the SATA connector
    changes again, and for that, there is a "micro connector". But
    we don't have to worry about that right now. Micro to regular adapters
    are hard to find.)

    http://www.techpowerup.com/img/08-11-24/xpgssd2_5sataii2.jpg

    There are some more pictures here.

    http://www.datarecoverytutorial.com/recover-data-from-failed-laptop-notebook/comment-page-1

    *******

    If you're having trouble making sense of what you're seeing, post
    back and describe what you see.

    If describing it is too hard, take a picture with a digital
    camera, then post the picture on imageshack.us , then post
    a copy of the URL that leads to the picture in your next posting.
    That way, someone here can look at the picture, and tell you
    whether there is an adapter in the way, and what kind of drive
    it is. But with that datarecoverytutorial.com web page above, you'll
    likely be able to figure it out pretty quick.

    Paul
     
  5. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Jun 13, 9:55 pm, brubaker325
    <brubaker...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > Geek Squad tells me the motherboard on my laptop has failed.  As a result, I
    > can't boot it up.  How do I get the files transferred out to another laptop
    > or desktop?  Neither of which is new.
    > Thanks.


    What happens when you try to boot the laptop?

    What is the make and model of the laptop.

    I happen to know a Geek Squad Certified Expert so I can perhaps get
    another option.

    Here is an informative link:

    http://www.bootstrike.com/ComputerService/badtactics.html
     
  6. LVTravel

    LVTravel Flightless Bird

    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:hv4rpe$4m5$1@speranza.aioe.org...
    > brubaker325 wrote:
    >> Geek Squad tells me the motherboard on my laptop has failed. As a
    >> result, I can't boot it up. How do I get the files transferred out to
    >> another laptop or desktop? Neither of which is new.
    >> Thanks.

    >
    > When you remove the hard drive, it might have some kind of goofy adapter
    > on the interface pins.
    >

    SNIP

    Paul when I first saw the "goofy adapter" I thought, Oh Boy, another one of
    those kinds of posts. When I read further, I was very pleasantly surprised
    at the fullness of the post and how it walked one though getting the proper
    device.

    Thanks for the full, complete post, that is the way to help people. Great
    job.

    >
    > Paul
     
  7. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    PA Bear [MS MVP] wrote:
    > "Daave" wrote:
    >>> Geek Squad tells me the motherboard on my laptop has failed. As a
    >>> result, I can't boot it up. How do I get the files transferred out
    >>> to another laptop or desktop? Neither of which is new.
    >>> Thanks.

    >>
    >> I'd be wary of anything Geek Squad tells you...

    >
    > +1
    >
    > Run, do not walk, away from Geek Squad/Best Buy.


    How true!!!
     
  8. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    LVTravel wrote:
    >
    >
    > "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    > news:hv4rpe$4m5$1@speranza.aioe.org...
    >> brubaker325 wrote:
    >>> Geek Squad tells me the motherboard on my laptop has failed. As a
    >>> result, I can't boot it up. How do I get the files transferred out
    >>> to another laptop or desktop? Neither of which is new.
    >>> Thanks.

    >>
    >> When you remove the hard drive, it might have some kind of goofy adapter
    >> on the interface pins.
    >>

    > SNIP
    >
    > Paul when I first saw the "goofy adapter" I thought, Oh Boy, another one
    > of those kinds of posts. When I read further, I was very pleasantly
    > surprised at the fullness of the post and how it walked one though
    > getting the proper device.
    >
    > Thanks for the full, complete post, that is the way to help people.
    > Great job.
    >
    >>
    >> Paul

    >


    Someone suggested to me, that some of the adapter devices that snap on
    to the back of drives, are to allow flexure of the laptop casing,
    without snapping an I/O connector. I don't have pictures of all
    of those things. One of them, has what looks like knife blades, and are
    hard to describe. I'm not even sure what keeps them on the back
    of the drive. It likely isn't held on with screws.

    I mention that, because it freaks out some users, when they go to
    connect hard drive cabling, only to find they can't plug it in,
    because the thing on the back of the drive is "different".

    Paul
     
  9. LVTravel

    LVTravel Flightless Bird

    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:hv65el$ip5$1@speranza.aioe.org...
    > LVTravel wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    >> news:hv4rpe$4m5$1@speranza.aioe.org...
    >>> brubaker325 wrote:
    >>>> Geek Squad tells me the motherboard on my laptop has failed. As a
    >>>> result, I can't boot it up. How do I get the files transferred out to
    >>>> another laptop or desktop? Neither of which is new.
    >>>> Thanks.
    >>>
    >>> When you remove the hard drive, it might have some kind of goofy adapter
    >>> on the interface pins.
    >>>

    >> SNIP
    >>
    >> Paul when I first saw the "goofy adapter" I thought, Oh Boy, another one
    >> of those kinds of posts. When I read further, I was very pleasantly
    >> surprised at the fullness of the post and how it walked one though
    >> getting the proper device.
    >>
    >> Thanks for the full, complete post, that is the way to help people.
    >> Great job.
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >>

    >
    > Someone suggested to me, that some of the adapter devices that snap on
    > to the back of drives, are to allow flexure of the laptop casing,
    > without snapping an I/O connector. I don't have pictures of all
    > of those things. One of them, has what looks like knife blades, and are
    > hard to describe. I'm not even sure what keeps them on the back
    > of the drive. It likely isn't held on with screws.
    >
    > I mention that, because it freaks out some users, when they go to
    > connect hard drive cabling, only to find they can't plug it in,
    > because the thing on the back of the drive is "different".
    >
    > Paul



    I know what you mean. I had a bad power supply and/or processor board on a
    Western Digital USB MyBook. I wanted to use the drive and when I opened up
    the case didn't know what type of drive I had as it had a really
    non-standard connector applied to the back of a standard SATA 3.5" drive.
    Once I pried the unusual connector off the SATA drive works great in my
    computer's drive bay.
     
  10. Bruce Chambers

    Bruce Chambers Flightless Bird

    brubaker325 wrote:
    > Geek Squad tells me the motherboard on my laptop has failed. As a result, I
    > can't boot it up.



    One should always listen very carefully to the Geek Squad, and then do
    exactly the opposite of anything they advise; Best Buy is probably one
    of the worst possible places to take a computer for service. You might
    want to get a second opinion, this one from a professional.


    > How do I get the files transferred out to another laptop
    > or desktop? Neither of which is new.



    The simplest way, assuming you've a network, is to download and create
    a live Linux boot CD, and then use it to boot the laptop and transfer
    the files to a network share. A second option, as already suggested, is
    to remove the hard drive from the laptop and connect to another computer
    using a USB enclosure.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     

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