1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Transfer of XP to another pc

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by scbs29, Feb 8, 2010.

  1. scbs29

    scbs29 Flightless Bird

    I have just been given a pc with a better spec than my present one
    (Pentium 4 dual core 3GHz instead of Athlon 2800XP, GeForce 7895 GT
    instead of GeForce 7600 GS) and want to transfer my XP Pro (Full
    version, not OEM, not upgrade) to the new one.
    From the Microsoft website I gather that I can transfer as long as I
    format the hard disk on the old machine.
    I thought that I could create an image with Acronis True Image, copy
    this to a usb hdd, connect this to the new machine (after installing
    just a 'bare bones' XP and then install this image onto the new
    machine as the OS. Then uninstall the sound driver, motherboard
    drivers and graphics driver and install the new ones.
    Is this reasonable ?
    Am I likely to have any problems reactivating XP ?
    TIA


    remove fred before emailing
    Registered Linux User 490858
     
  2. smlunatick

    smlunatick Flightless Bird

    On Feb 8, 4:23 pm, scbs29 <stuart.c...@fred.tiscali.co.uk> wrote:
    > I have just been given a pc with a better spec than my present one
    > (Pentium 4 dual core 3GHz instead of Athlon 2800XP, GeForce 7895 GT
    > instead of GeForce 7600 GS) and want to transfer my XP Pro (Full
    > version, not OEM, not upgrade) to the new one.
    > From the Microsoft website I gather that I can transfer as long as I
    > format the hard disk on the old machine.
    > I thought that I could create an image with Acronis True Image, copy
    > this to a usb hdd, connect this to the new machine (after installing
    > just a 'bare bones' XP and then install this image onto the new
    > machine as the OS. Then uninstall the sound driver, motherboard
    > drivers and graphics driver and install the new ones.
    > Is this reasonable ?
    > Am I likely to have any problems reactivating XP ?
    > TIA
    >
    > remove fred before emailing
    > Registered Linux User 490858


    You will still need to re-install the XP on top of the "restored"
    image. Each XP needs to built a "token" for the XP Product
    Activation. No two PCs are ever exactly 100% the same.
     
  3. DL

    DL Flightless Bird

    Acronis can copy / recover your image from wherever you stored it directly
    to your new PC.
    You boot from the Acronis cd, follow instructions, select the image location
    and destination location.
    But then you will need to perform a repair installation of winxp in order to
    install the new pc's drivers

    "scbs29" <stuart.crow@fred.tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:l3e0n594m0n66kk16qn8viu0hd3k09ncg2@4ax.com...
    >I have just been given a pc with a better spec than my present one
    > (Pentium 4 dual core 3GHz instead of Athlon 2800XP, GeForce 7895 GT
    > instead of GeForce 7600 GS) and want to transfer my XP Pro (Full
    > version, not OEM, not upgrade) to the new one.
    > From the Microsoft website I gather that I can transfer as long as I
    > format the hard disk on the old machine.
    > I thought that I could create an image with Acronis True Image, copy
    > this to a usb hdd, connect this to the new machine (after installing
    > just a 'bare bones' XP and then install this image onto the new
    > machine as the OS. Then uninstall the sound driver, motherboard
    > drivers and graphics driver and install the new ones.
    > Is this reasonable ?
    > Am I likely to have any problems reactivating XP ?
    > TIA
    >
    >
    > remove fred before emailing
    > Registered Linux User 490858
     
  4. Doum

    Doum Flightless Bird

    scbs29 <stuart.crow@fred.tiscali.co.uk> écrivait
    news:l3e0n594m0n66kk16qn8viu0hd3k09ncg2@4ax.com:

    > I have just been given a pc with a better spec than my present one
    > (Pentium 4 dual core 3GHz instead of Athlon 2800XP, GeForce 7895 GT
    > instead of GeForce 7600 GS) and want to transfer my XP Pro (Full
    > version, not OEM, not upgrade) to the new one.
    > From the Microsoft website I gather that I can transfer as long as I
    > format the hard disk on the old machine.
    > I thought that I could create an image with Acronis True Image, copy
    > this to a usb hdd, connect this to the new machine (after installing
    > just a 'bare bones' XP and then install this image onto the new
    > machine as the OS. Then uninstall the sound driver, motherboard
    > drivers and graphics driver and install the new ones.
    > Is this reasonable ?
    > Am I likely to have any problems reactivating XP ?
    > TIA
    >
    >
    > remove fred before emailing
    > Registered Linux User 490858


    As other said, you will need to do a repair install which is almost as
    long as a clean install, you will need to install the correct drivers for
    your "new" hardware; and after a repair install you might need to
    reinstall all Windows updates.

    For these reasons, I think it would be best to perform a clean install so
    there won't be risk of instability, just going from AMD to Intel would
    lead me to believe a clean install is "safer".

    If your installation CD is not at SP3 level, you could slipstream SP3 to
    your CD and burn a new one with something like nLite before proceeding,
    that would reduce the "Windows Updates" time after the new installation.

    Once your new installation is up and running (activated) and up to date
    you could create an "image" of your hard disk to an external device with
    someting like Acronis True Image or Norton Ghost. In case you need to
    reinstall later, that would be much faster to restore the image than to
    reinstall everything. I would make an image before AND after installing
    other softwares such as Office suite or games.

    HTH
     
  5. Bill in Co.

    Bill in Co. Flightless Bird

    scbs29 wrote:
    > I have just been given a pc with a better spec than my present one
    > (Pentium 4 dual core 3GHz instead of Athlon 2800XP, GeForce 7895 GT
    > instead of GeForce 7600 GS) and want to transfer my XP Pro (Full
    > version, not OEM, not upgrade) to the new one.
    > From the Microsoft website I gather that I can transfer as long as I
    > format the hard disk on the old machine.
    > I thought that I could create an image with Acronis True Image, copy
    > this to a usb hdd, connect this to the new machine (after installing
    > just a 'bare bones' XP and then install this image onto the new
    > machine as the OS. Then uninstall the sound driver, motherboard
    > drivers and graphics driver and install the new ones.
    > Is this reasonable ?
    > Am I likely to have any problems reactivating XP ?
    > TIA


    As others have mentioned, it may not be that easy. Another (and I think a
    lot better) option would be to leave the new PC installation (with its
    correct drivers, etc), alone, but use something like Laplink PC Mover to
    move all your stuff over to the new PC. I know that worked out well for me
    when migrating from a Win98 computer to this WinXP computer, and only a few
    apps needed to be reinstalled.
     
  6. scbs29

    scbs29 Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 8 Feb 2010 13:41:42 -0700, "Bill in Co."
    <not_really_here@earthlink.net> wrote:

    >scbs29 wrote:
    >> I have just been given a pc with a better spec than my present one
    >> (Pentium 4 dual core 3GHz instead of Athlon 2800XP, GeForce 7895 GT
    >> instead of GeForce 7600 GS) and want to transfer my XP Pro (Full
    >> version, not OEM, not upgrade) to the new one.
    >> From the Microsoft website I gather that I can transfer as long as I
    >> format the hard disk on the old machine.
    >> I thought that I could create an image with Acronis True Image, copy
    >> this to a usb hdd, connect this to the new machine (after installing
    >> just a 'bare bones' XP and then install this image onto the new
    >> machine as the OS. Then uninstall the sound driver, motherboard
    >> drivers and graphics driver and install the new ones.
    >> Is this reasonable ?
    >> Am I likely to have any problems reactivating XP ?
    >> TIA

    >
    >As others have mentioned, it may not be that easy. Another (and I think a
    >lot better) option would be to leave the new PC installation (with its
    >correct drivers, etc), alone, but use something like Laplink PC Mover to
    >move all your stuff over to the new PC. I know that worked out well for me
    >when migrating from a Win98 computer to this WinXP computer, and only a few
    >apps needed to be reinstalled.
    >


    Thanks to all for the advice.
    Looks as if a complete installation on the new pc would be the best
    bet, so that is what I will do when I get chance.

    remove fred before emailing
    Registered Linux User 490858
     
  7. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    >>scbs29 wrote:
    >>> I have just been given a pc with a better spec than my present one
    >>> (Pentium 4 dual core 3GHz instead of Athlon 2800XP, GeForce 7895 GT
    >>> instead of GeForce 7600 GS) and want to transfer my XP Pro (Full
    >>> version, not OEM, not upgrade) to the new one.
    >>> From the Microsoft website I gather that I can transfer as long as I
    >>> format the hard disk on the old machine.
    >>> I thought that I could create an image with Acronis True Image, copy
    >>> this to a usb hdd, connect this to the new machine (after installing
    >>> just a 'bare bones' XP and then install this image onto the new
    >>> machine as the OS. Then uninstall the sound driver, motherboard
    >>> drivers and graphics driver and install the new ones.
    >>> Is this reasonable ?
    >>> Am I likely to have any problems reactivating XP ?
    >>> TIA



    "scbs29" <stuart.crow@fred.tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:gqi2n5lpj8tk9lbcj71tjsj47a3ro0e47r@4ax.com...
    > Thanks to all for the advice.
    > Looks as if a complete installation on the new pc would be the best
    > bet, so that is what I will do when I get chance.
    >
    > remove fred before emailing
    > Registered Linux User 490858



    scbs...:
    While a fresh install of the XP OS onto your new PC together with your
    programs/applications & personal data is *always* an option why not at least
    consider another approach involving the transfer of your old system to the
    new one? At the very least it will be a good learning experience for you
    (even if it's not successful) and an interesting way to (possibly)
    accomplish the objective you're seeking.

    Before I get into the details of some possible options a few points...

    1. I'm assuming that you would be reasonably comfortable uninstalling &
    reinstalling a HDD from your desktop PCs. Obviously this means getting
    inside the "guts" of your desktop PC's case to accomplish this. The process
    is generally reasonably simple & straightforward but obviously many users
    are loathe to do so.
    2. Note that the Microsoft cautionary note you mentioned re the need to
    format the "old" HDD following the transfer of the system to the new machine
    (and its subsequent activation) is (apparently) MS's way of emphasizing that
    since you have only a single retail license you can install/utilize the XP
    OS contained on your XP installation CD only on a single PC using the
    Product Key (Product ID) associated with that OS CD. Under the terms of the
    retail license agreement you are not permitted to install/utilize the OS on
    two or more different PCs using the same Product Key. I trust you understand
    that.
    3. It (nearly) goes without saying that the "old" system being transferred
    to the new machine is bootable without incident and fully functional, i.e.,
    completely free of any problems. If there are *any* problems with the old
    system do not go any further.

    Hopefully the following options will be practical in your situation. In any
    event see if they're worth considering...

    1. Since apparently your new PC is a desktop machine why not install your
    old HDD in the new machine and use your Acronis True Image's disk-cloning
    capability to clone the contents of your old HDD to the new one? Assuming
    you have no plans to return the old HDD to its original "home" perhaps
    following the disk-cloning operation you might decide to retain the old HDD
    in the new machine as a secondary HDD for backup and/or other purposes.
    Following the activation of the new system (using the original Product Key)
    should you reinstall the old HDD back to its original machine you would not
    be permitted to utilize the XP OS (using the same Product Key) contained on
    that disk under the terms of the MS licensing agreement as noted above.

    or,

    2. Assuming your USB external enclosure does not already contain a HDD,
    alternatively you could install your old HDD in your USB external enclosure,
    connect it to the new PC, clone its contents to the new HDD, and then
    reinstall the disk back in its original machine. Or if your USBEHD already
    contains an installed HDD simply clone the contents from your old (AMD)
    machine's HDD to that HDD and then clone its contents to your new HDD. The
    latter option obviously avoids the need to disconnect the HDD from the old
    machine.

    In any event the likelihood is that following the disk-cloning operation (to
    the new machine's HDD) you will need to undertake a Repair install of the XP
    OS using, of course, your XP OS installation CD. While there's a chance that
    this will not be necessary, i.e., the new system will boot straightaway -
    it's only a slim chance. The fact that you're going from an AMD to an Intel
    system does not in & of itself negate that possibility. If you're not
    familiar with the Repair process see...
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/winxp/install.mspx

    Should there be a need for the Repair install of the OS it's a rather simple
    & straightforward procedure, virtually identical to making a fresh install
    of the OS. Assuming you then have a bootable system and as you are aware,
    you will need to install the necessary motherboard drivers and other drivers
    such as the sound & graphics drivers that you mentioned. And of course
    install any later Service Packs should they be needed together with updated
    MS critical updates. Actually it would be best if you would use a
    "slipstreamed" XP OS installation CD containing SP3 to undertake the Repair
    install. While you could use an XP OS installation CD containing an earlier
    SP to undertake the Repair install presumably you would later be installing
    SP3.

    And as you are aware, following the system transfer you will most likely
    need to activate the system.

    3. One thing more. If you do decide to undertake any of the preceding
    approaches it is *always* prudent to first copy (backup) any important or
    critical data from your old HDD before proceeding with the transfer/cloning
    operations as described above. While it would be extremely unlikely that
    loss or corruption of the *original* data might occur as a result of these
    operations it's always a possibility, rare as it might be. So keep that in
    mind.
    Anna
     
  8. scbs29

    scbs29 Flightless Bird

    On Tue, 9 Feb 2010 10:44:18 -0500, "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote:

    >
    >>>scbs29 wrote:
    >>>> I have just been given a pc with a better spec than my present one
    >>>> (Pentium 4 dual core 3GHz instead of Athlon 2800XP, GeForce 7895 GT

    snip
    >
    >Before I get into the details of some possible options a few points...
    >
    >1. I'm assuming that you would be reasonably comfortable uninstalling &
    >reinstalling a HDD from your desktop PCs. Obviously this means getting
    >inside the "guts" of your desktop PC's case to accomplish this. The process
    >is generally reasonably simple & straightforward but obviously many users
    >are loathe to do so.
    >2. Note that the Microsoft cautionary note you mentioned re the need to
    >format the "old" HDD following the transfer of the system to the new machine
    >(and its subsequent activation) is (apparently) MS's way of emphasizing that
    >since you have only a single retail license you can install/utilize the XP
    >OS contained on your XP installation CD only on a single PC using the
    >Product Key (Product ID) associated with that OS CD. Under the terms of the
    >retail license agreement you are not permitted to install/utilize the OS on
    >two or more different PCs using the same Product Key. I trust you understand
    >that.
    >3. It (nearly) goes without saying that the "old" system being transferred
    >to the new machine is bootable without incident and fully functional, i.e.,
    >completely free of any problems. If there are *any* problems with the old
    >system do not go any further.
    >
    >Hopefully the following options will be practical in your situation. In any
    >event see if they're worth considering...
    >
    >1. Since apparently your new PC is a desktop machine why not install your
    >old HDD in the new machine and use your Acronis True Image's disk-cloning
    >capability to clone the contents of your old HDD to the new one? Assuming
    >you have no plans to return the old HDD to its original "home" perhaps
    >following the disk-cloning operation you might decide to retain the old HDD
    >in the new machine as a secondary HDD for backup and/or other purposes.
    >Following the activation of the new system (using the original Product Key)
    >should you reinstall the old HDD back to its original machine you would not
    >be permitted to utilize the XP OS (using the same Product Key) contained on
    >that disk under the terms of the MS licensing agreement as noted above.
    >
    >or,
    >
    >2. Assuming your USB external enclosure does not already contain a HDD,
    >alternatively you could install your old HDD in your USB external enclosure,
    >connect it to the new PC, clone its contents to the new HDD, and then
    >reinstall the disk back in its original machine. Or if your USBEHD already
    >contains an installed HDD simply clone the contents from your old (AMD)
    >machine's HDD to that HDD and then clone its contents to your new HDD. The
    >latter option obviously avoids the need to disconnect the HDD from the old
    >machine.
    >
    >In any event the likelihood is that following the disk-cloning operation (to
    >the new machine's HDD) you will need to undertake a Repair install of the XP
    >OS using, of course, your XP OS installation CD. While there's a chance that
    >this will not be necessary, i.e., the new system will boot straightaway -
    >it's only a slim chance. The fact that you're going from an AMD to an Intel
    >system does not in & of itself negate that possibility. If you're not
    >familiar with the Repair process see...
    >http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/winxp/install.mspx
    >
    >Should there be a need for the Repair install of the OS it's a rather simple
    >& straightforward procedure, virtually identical to making a fresh install
    >of the OS. Assuming you then have a bootable system and as you are aware,
    >you will need to install the necessary motherboard drivers and other drivers
    >such as the sound & graphics drivers that you mentioned. And of course
    >install any later Service Packs should they be needed together with updated
    >MS critical updates. Actually it would be best if you would use a
    >"slipstreamed" XP OS installation CD containing SP3 to undertake the Repair
    >install. While you could use an XP OS installation CD containing an earlier
    >SP to undertake the Repair install presumably you would later be installing
    >SP3.
    >
    >And as you are aware, following the system transfer you will most likely
    >need to activate the system.
    >
    >3. One thing more. If you do decide to undertake any of the preceding
    >approaches it is *always* prudent to first copy (backup) any important or
    >critical data from your old HDD before proceeding with the transfer/cloning
    >operations as described above. While it would be extremely unlikely that
    >loss or corruption of the *original* data might occur as a result of these
    >operations it's always a possibility, rare as it might be. So keep that in
    >mind.
    >Anna
    >


    Thanks for the advice.

    The 'new' pc has sata disks whereas the 'old' one has ide.
    Will this make any difference ?
    I thought of buying an external disk caddy to connect to a pc using
    usb. I would then install the hdd with my XP in it and use that as an
    external usb hdd for the cloning.
    Does this sound reasonable ?
    The 'old' pc is to be passed to my son who will install his own XP.
    The 'old' pc has 2 disks, master with XP and slave with PCLinuxOS. My
    son will not require the slave disk as he has one of his own to use,
    so the external disk caddy would then be used with my 'new' pc as an
    external usb hdd.

    remove fred before emailing
    Registered Linux User 490858
     
  9. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    >
    >>
    >>>>scbs29 wrote:
    >>>>> I have just been given a pc with a better spec than my present one
    >>>>> (Pentium 4 dual core 3GHz instead of Athlon 2800XP, GeForce 7895 GT

    > snip



    > On Tue, 9 Feb 2010 10:44:18 -0500, "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote:
    >>Before I get into the details of some possible options a few points...
    >>
    >>1. I'm assuming that you would be reasonably comfortable uninstalling &
    >>reinstalling a HDD from your desktop PCs. Obviously this means getting
    >>inside the "guts" of your desktop PC's case to accomplish this. The
    >>process
    >>is generally reasonably simple & straightforward but obviously many users
    >>are loathe to do so.
    >>2. Note that the Microsoft cautionary note you mentioned re the need to
    >>format the "old" HDD following the transfer of the system to the new
    >>machine
    >>(and its subsequent activation) is (apparently) MS's way of emphasizing
    >>that
    >>since you have only a single retail license you can install/utilize the XP
    >>OS contained on your XP installation CD only on a single PC using the
    >>Product Key (Product ID) associated with that OS CD. Under the terms of
    >>the
    >>retail license agreement you are not permitted to install/utilize the OS
    >>on
    >>two or more different PCs using the same Product Key. I trust you
    >>understand
    >>that.
    >>3. It (nearly) goes without saying that the "old" system being transferred
    >>to the new machine is bootable without incident and fully functional,
    >>i.e.,
    >>completely free of any problems. If there are *any* problems with the old
    >>system do not go any further.
    >>
    >>Hopefully the following options will be practical in your situation. In
    >>any
    >>event see if they're worth considering...
    >>
    >>1. Since apparently your new PC is a desktop machine why not install your
    >>old HDD in the new machine and use your Acronis True Image's disk-cloning
    >>capability to clone the contents of your old HDD to the new one? Assuming
    >>you have no plans to return the old HDD to its original "home" perhaps
    >>following the disk-cloning operation you might decide to retain the old
    >>HDD
    >>in the new machine as a secondary HDD for backup and/or other purposes.
    >>Following the activation of the new system (using the original Product
    >>Key)
    >>should you reinstall the old HDD back to its original machine you would
    >>not
    >>be permitted to utilize the XP OS (using the same Product Key) contained
    >>on
    >>that disk under the terms of the MS licensing agreement as noted above.
    >>
    >>or,
    >>
    >>2. Assuming your USB external enclosure does not already contain a HDD,
    >>alternatively you could install your old HDD in your USB external
    >>enclosure,
    >>connect it to the new PC, clone its contents to the new HDD, and then
    >>reinstall the disk back in its original machine. Or if your USBEHD already
    >>contains an installed HDD simply clone the contents from your old (AMD)
    >>machine's HDD to that HDD and then clone its contents to your new HDD. The
    >>latter option obviously avoids the need to disconnect the HDD from the old
    >>machine.
    >>
    >>In any event the likelihood is that following the disk-cloning operation
    >>(to
    >>the new machine's HDD) you will need to undertake a Repair install of the
    >>XP
    >>OS using, of course, your XP OS installation CD. While there's a chance
    >>that
    >>this will not be necessary, i.e., the new system will boot straightaway -
    >>it's only a slim chance. The fact that you're going from an AMD to an
    >>Intel
    >>system does not in & of itself negate that possibility. If you're not
    >>familiar with the Repair process see...
    >>http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/winxp/install.mspx
    >>
    >>Should there be a need for the Repair install of the OS it's a rather
    >>simple
    >>& straightforward procedure, virtually identical to making a fresh install
    >>of the OS. Assuming you then have a bootable system and as you are aware,
    >>you will need to install the necessary motherboard drivers and other
    >>drivers
    >>such as the sound & graphics drivers that you mentioned. And of course
    >>install any later Service Packs should they be needed together with
    >>updated
    >>MS critical updates. Actually it would be best if you would use a
    >>"slipstreamed" XP OS installation CD containing SP3 to undertake the
    >>Repair
    >>install. While you could use an XP OS installation CD containing an
    >>earlier
    >>SP to undertake the Repair install presumably you would later be
    >>installing
    >>SP3.
    >>
    >>And as you are aware, following the system transfer you will most likely
    >>need to activate the system.
    >>
    >>3. One thing more. If you do decide to undertake any of the preceding
    >>approaches it is *always* prudent to first copy (backup) any important or
    >>critical data from your old HDD before proceeding with the
    >>transfer/cloning
    >>operations as described above. While it would be extremely unlikely that
    >>loss or corruption of the *original* data might occur as a result of these
    >>operations it's always a possibility, rare as it might be. So keep that in
    >>mind.
    >>Anna



    "scbs29" <stuart.crow@fred.tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:6056n5pdptqc0p3l3fntqnvoc48jl82c8l@4ax.com...
    > Thanks for the advice.
    >
    > The 'new' pc has sata disks whereas the 'old' one has ide.
    > Will this make any difference ?
    > I thought of buying an external disk caddy to connect to a pc using
    > usb. I would then install the hdd with my XP in it and use that as an
    > external usb hdd for the cloning.
    > Does this sound reasonable ?
    > The 'old' pc is to be passed to my son who will install his own XP.
    > The 'old' pc has 2 disks, master with XP and slave with PCLinuxOS. My
    > son will not require the slave disk as he has one of his own to use,
    > so the external disk caddy would then be used with my 'new' pc as an
    > external usb hdd.
    >
    > remove fred before emailing
    > Registered Linux User 490858



    1. No, the fact that one system has PATA (IDE) HDDs and the other SATA HDDs
    is of no consequence based on the issue at hand.

    2. I inferred from your original post that you already had a USB external
    HDD but I take it that's not the case since you now indicate you're thinking
    about purchasing an external enclosure. In any event that will work just
    fine when you install the "old" HDD in that device and clone its contents to
    the HDD in the new machine as previously discussed. Naturally the external
    enclosure you purchase should be designed for housing a PATA, not a SATA
    HDD. Since (I assume) you subsequently plan to use that device (including
    the old HDD) with your new PC for backup and/or auxiliary storage of data
    that too should work just fine for you.
    Anna
     
  10. scbs29

    scbs29 Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 10 Feb 2010 17:44:23 -0500, "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote:

    >
    >>
    >>>
    >>>>>scbs29 wrote:
    >>>>>> I have just been given a pc with a better spec than my present one
    >>>>>> (Pentium 4 dual core 3GHz instead of Athlon 2800XP, GeForce 7895 GT

    >> snip

    >
    >
    >> On Tue, 9 Feb 2010 10:44:18 -0500, "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote:
    >>>Before I get into the details of some possible options a few points...
    >>>
    >>>1. I'm assuming that you would be reasonably comfortable uninstalling &
    >>>reinstalling a HDD from your desktop PCs. Obviously this means getting
    >>>inside the "guts" of your desktop PC's case to accomplish this. The
    >>>process
    >>>is generally reasonably simple & straightforward but obviously many users
    >>>are loathe to do so.
    >>>2. Note that the Microsoft cautionary note you mentioned re the need to
    >>>format the "old" HDD following the transfer of the system to the new
    >>>machine
    >>>(and its subsequent activation) is (apparently) MS's way of emphasizing
    >>>that
    >>>since you have only a single retail license you can install/utilize the XP
    >>>OS contained on your XP installation CD only on a single PC using the
    >>>Product Key (Product ID) associated with that OS CD. Under the terms of
    >>>the
    >>>retail license agreement you are not permitted to install/utilize the OS
    >>>on
    >>>two or more different PCs using the same Product Key. I trust you
    >>>understand
    >>>that.
    >>>3. It (nearly) goes without saying that the "old" system being transferred
    >>>to the new machine is bootable without incident and fully functional,
    >>>i.e.,
    >>>completely free of any problems. If there are *any* problems with the old
    >>>system do not go any further.
    >>>
    >>>Hopefully the following options will be practical in your situation. In
    >>>any
    >>>event see if they're worth considering...
    >>>
    >>>1. Since apparently your new PC is a desktop machine why not install your
    >>>old HDD in the new machine and use your Acronis True Image's disk-cloning
    >>>capability to clone the contents of your old HDD to the new one? Assuming
    >>>you have no plans to return the old HDD to its original "home" perhaps
    >>>following the disk-cloning operation you might decide to retain the old
    >>>HDD
    >>>in the new machine as a secondary HDD for backup and/or other purposes.
    >>>Following the activation of the new system (using the original Product
    >>>Key)
    >>>should you reinstall the old HDD back to its original machine you would
    >>>not
    >>>be permitted to utilize the XP OS (using the same Product Key) contained
    >>>on
    >>>that disk under the terms of the MS licensing agreement as noted above.
    >>>
    >>>or,
    >>>
    >>>2. Assuming your USB external enclosure does not already contain a HDD,
    >>>alternatively you could install your old HDD in your USB external
    >>>enclosure,
    >>>connect it to the new PC, clone its contents to the new HDD, and then
    >>>reinstall the disk back in its original machine. Or if your USBEHD already
    >>>contains an installed HDD simply clone the contents from your old (AMD)
    >>>machine's HDD to that HDD and then clone its contents to your new HDD. The
    >>>latter option obviously avoids the need to disconnect the HDD from the old
    >>>machine.
    >>>
    >>>In any event the likelihood is that following the disk-cloning operation
    >>>(to
    >>>the new machine's HDD) you will need to undertake a Repair install of the
    >>>XP
    >>>OS using, of course, your XP OS installation CD. While there's a chance
    >>>that
    >>>this will not be necessary, i.e., the new system will boot straightaway -
    >>>it's only a slim chance. The fact that you're going from an AMD to an
    >>>Intel
    >>>system does not in & of itself negate that possibility. If you're not
    >>>familiar with the Repair process see...
    >>>http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/winxp/install.mspx
    >>>
    >>>Should there be a need for the Repair install of the OS it's a rather
    >>>simple
    >>>& straightforward procedure, virtually identical to making a fresh install
    >>>of the OS. Assuming you then have a bootable system and as you are aware,
    >>>you will need to install the necessary motherboard drivers and other
    >>>drivers
    >>>such as the sound & graphics drivers that you mentioned. And of course
    >>>install any later Service Packs should they be needed together with
    >>>updated
    >>>MS critical updates. Actually it would be best if you would use a
    >>>"slipstreamed" XP OS installation CD containing SP3 to undertake the
    >>>Repair
    >>>install. While you could use an XP OS installation CD containing an
    >>>earlier
    >>>SP to undertake the Repair install presumably you would later be
    >>>installing
    >>>SP3.
    >>>
    >>>And as you are aware, following the system transfer you will most likely
    >>>need to activate the system.
    >>>
    >>>3. One thing more. If you do decide to undertake any of the preceding
    >>>approaches it is *always* prudent to first copy (backup) any important or
    >>>critical data from your old HDD before proceeding with the
    >>>transfer/cloning
    >>>operations as described above. While it would be extremely unlikely that
    >>>loss or corruption of the *original* data might occur as a result of these
    >>>operations it's always a possibility, rare as it might be. So keep that in
    >>>mind.
    >>>Anna

    >
    >
    >"scbs29" <stuart.crow@fred.tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    >news:6056n5pdptqc0p3l3fntqnvoc48jl82c8l@4ax.com...
    >> Thanks for the advice.
    >>
    >> The 'new' pc has sata disks whereas the 'old' one has ide.
    >> Will this make any difference ?
    >> I thought of buying an external disk caddy to connect to a pc using
    >> usb. I would then install the hdd with my XP in it and use that as an
    >> external usb hdd for the cloning.
    >> Does this sound reasonable ?
    >> The 'old' pc is to be passed to my son who will install his own XP.
    >> The 'old' pc has 2 disks, master with XP and slave with PCLinuxOS. My
    >> son will not require the slave disk as he has one of his own to use,
    >> so the external disk caddy would then be used with my 'new' pc as an
    >> external usb hdd.
    >>
    >> remove fred before emailing
    >> Registered Linux User 490858

    >
    >
    >1. No, the fact that one system has PATA (IDE) HDDs and the other SATA HDDs
    >is of no consequence based on the issue at hand.
    >
    >2. I inferred from your original post that you already had a USB external
    >HDD but I take it that's not the case since you now indicate you're thinking
    >about purchasing an external enclosure. In any event that will work just
    >fine when you install the "old" HDD in that device and clone its contents to
    >the HDD in the new machine as previously discussed. Naturally the external
    >enclosure you purchase should be designed for housing a PATA, not a SATA
    >HDD. Since (I assume) you subsequently plan to use that device (including
    >the old HDD) with your new PC for backup and/or auxiliary storage of data
    >that too should work just fine for you.
    >Anna
    >
    >


    Thanks again for the reply.
    I already have an external usb hdd so I will use TrueImage to create
    an image on that (after uninstalling the drivers) and then install the
    image onto the 'new' pc on the XP partition. I did think of this in
    the first place, but thought I had better get some advice first.
    I will still get an enclosure for the hdd that I take out of my 'old'
    pc.
    I will post back how I get on.

    remove fred before emailing
    Registered Linux User 490858
     
  11. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    >"scbs29" <stuart.crow@fred.tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    >news:6056n5pdptqc0p3l3fntqnvoc48jl82c8l@4ax.com...
    >> Thanks for the advice.
    >>
    >> The 'new' pc has sata disks whereas the 'old' one has ide.
    >> Will this make any difference ?
    >> I thought of buying an external disk caddy to connect to a pc using
    >> usb. I would then install the hdd with my XP in it and use that as an
    >> external usb hdd for the cloning.
    >> Does this sound reasonable ?
    >> The 'old' pc is to be passed to my son who will install his own XP.
    >> The 'old' pc has 2 disks, master with XP and slave with PCLinuxOS. My
    >> son will not require the slave disk as he has one of his own to use,
    >> so the external disk caddy would then be used with my 'new' pc as an
    >> external usb hdd.
    >>
    >> remove fred before emailing
    >> Registered Linux User 490858



    > On Wed, 10 Feb 2010 17:44:23 -0500, "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote:
    >>1. No, the fact that one system has PATA (IDE) HDDs and the other SATA
    >>HDDs
    >>is of no consequence based on the issue at hand.
    >>
    >>2. I inferred from your original post that you already had a USB external
    >>HDD but I take it that's not the case since you now indicate you're
    >>thinking
    >>about purchasing an external enclosure. In any event that will work just
    >>fine when you install the "old" HDD in that device and clone its contents
    >>to
    >>the HDD in the new machine as previously discussed. Naturally the external
    >>enclosure you purchase should be designed for housing a PATA, not a SATA
    >>HDD. Since (I assume) you subsequently plan to use that device (including
    >>the old HDD) with your new PC for backup and/or auxiliary storage of data
    >>that too should work just fine for you.
    >>Anna




    "scbs29" <stuart.crow@fred.tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:rje6n5lu2he1j675nooidhh176cko60f7f@4ax.com...
    > Thanks again for the reply.
    > I already have an external usb hdd so I will use TrueImage to create
    > an image on that (after uninstalling the drivers) and then install the
    > image onto the 'new' pc on the XP partition. I did think of this in
    > the first place, but thought I had better get some advice first.
    > I will still get an enclosure for the hdd that I take out of my 'old'
    > pc.
    > I will post back how I get on.
    >
    > remove fred before emailing
    > Registered Linux User 490858



    scbs...
    It's hard for me to understand why you would find it necessary to purchase
    another USB external enclosure and (based upon your last post) I really
    don't think you're going about this in a relatively simple & straightforward
    way. So let me amplify...

    1. Could you not use your old "slave" HDD to install in your current USB
    external enclosure and using your Acronis program, simply clone (not image)
    the contents of your old XP system to that "destination" drive? There is
    *no* need for "uninstalling the drivers". Just clone the entire contents of
    the system to your USBEHD.

    2. Then you would simply connect the USBEHD to the new machine and clone its
    contents to the "new" HDD.

    3. You could continue to use the USBEHD as the backup/auxiliary storage
    device with your new PC and assuming you're not giving the "old" HDD to your
    son you could install that disk as a secondary (internal) HDD in your new
    system if you want. Or, if for one reason or another that's impractical
    install the "old" HDD in the USB external enclosure in place of the former
    "slave" HDD.

    In any event the above procedure would negate the need for you to purchase
    another USB external enclosure.
    Anna
     
  12. scbs29

    scbs29 Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 10 Feb 2010 18:58:37 -0500, "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote:

    >
    >
    >>"scbs29" <stuart.crow@fred.tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    >>news:6056n5pdptqc0p3l3fntqnvoc48jl82c8l@4ax.com...
    >>> Thanks for the advice.
    >>>
    >>> The 'new' pc has sata disks whereas the 'old' one has ide.
    >>> Will this make any difference ?
    >>> I thought of buying an external disk caddy to connect to a pc using

    snip
    >> pc.
    >> I will post back how I get on.
    >>
    >> remove fred before emailing
    >> Registered Linux User 490858

    >
    >
    >scbs...
    >It's hard for me to understand why you would find it necessary to purchase
    >another USB external enclosure and (based upon your last post) I really
    >don't think you're going about this in a relatively simple & straightforward
    >way. So let me amplify...
    >
    >1. Could you not use your old "slave" HDD to install in your current USB
    >external enclosure and using your Acronis program, simply clone (not image)
    >the contents of your old XP system to that "destination" drive? There is
    >*no* need for "uninstalling the drivers". Just clone the entire contents of
    >the system to your USBEHD.
    >
    >2. Then you would simply connect the USBEHD to the new machine and clone its
    >contents to the "new" HDD.
    >
    >3. You could continue to use the USBEHD as the backup/auxiliary storage
    >device with your new PC and assuming you're not giving the "old" HDD to your
    >son you could install that disk as a secondary (internal) HDD in your new
    >system if you want. Or, if for one reason or another that's impractical
    >install the "old" HDD in the USB external enclosure in place of the former
    >"slave" HDD.
    >
    >In any event the above procedure would negate the need for you to purchase
    >another USB external enclosure.
    >Anna
    >


    As I said earlier, the 'slave' hdd will be removed from my 'old' pc
    since my son has his own already used hdd to use in its place.
    Although I already have an external USB hdd (bought as a usb hdd, not
    enclosure for an internal hdd), I do not want to throw away the hdd
    the I remove from the 'old' pc, so have an enclosure to use it as
    another external usb hdd.
    The 'new' pc already has 2 internal hdds, both sata. The hdd in the
    'old' pc are ide.

    remove fred before emailing
    Registered Linux User 490858
     
  13. scbs29

    scbs29 Flightless Bird

    On Thu, 11 Feb 2010 13:59:06 +0000, scbs29
    <stuart.crow@fred.tiscali.co.uk> wrote:

    >On Wed, 10 Feb 2010 18:58:37 -0500, "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>>"scbs29" <stuart.crow@fred.tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    >>>news:6056n5pdptqc0p3l3fntqnvoc48jl82c8l@4ax.com...
    >>>> Thanks for the advice.
    >>>>
    >>>> The 'new' pc has sata disks whereas the 'old' one has ide.
    >>>> Will this make any difference ?
    >>>> I thought of buying an external disk caddy to connect to a pc using

    >snip
    >>> pc.
    >>> I will post back how I get on.
    >>>
    >>> remove fred before emailing
    >>> Registered Linux User 490858

    >>
    >>
    >>scbs...
    >>It's hard for me to understand why you would find it necessary to purchase
    >>another USB external enclosure and (based upon your last post) I really
    >>don't think you're going about this in a relatively simple & straightforward
    >>way. So let me amplify...

    snip
    >
    >As I said earlier, the 'slave' hdd will be removed from my 'old' pc
    >since my son has his own already used hdd to use in its place.
    >Although I already have an external USB hdd (bought as a usb hdd, not
    >enclosure for an internal hdd), I do not want to throw away the hdd
    >the I remove from the 'old' pc, so have an enclosure to use it as
    >another external usb hdd.
    >The 'new' pc already has 2 internal hdds, both sata. The hdd in the
    >'old' pc are ide.
    >
    >remove fred before emailing
    >Registered Linux User 490858


    Well, it is done with more or less complete success.
    I partitioned the internal sata disk into Windows and PCLinuxOS.
    Installed XP, then PCLinuxOS, used GRUB for booting. Then restored the
    TrueImage image of XP over that installed (using TrueImage 2010 with
    Plus pack for restore to different hardware), and everything was
    there, even GRUB. First time of booting had a NTLDR is missing type
    message, but did Ctrl-Alt-Del and the GRUB menu appeared. From this I
    can boot XP or PCLos and both are working fine.
    Had one more instance of NTLDR is missing type message but again
    booted ok on restart. Need to look into this.
    Second hdd taken out of 'old' pc into an enclosure and that works fine
    as well.
    Thanks for all the advice.

    remove fred before emailing
    Registered Linux User 490858
     

Share This Page