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Second hard drive question

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Safety123, Apr 19, 2010.

  1. Safety123

    Safety123 Flightless Bird

    I have a Pentium 4 2.26 GHZ with one gig ram with a WD Caviar 80 gig
    800 JB. Hard drive is 2006, computer is 2002.

    I ordered a similar hard drive and wish to add it. How hard will it
    be? Is it just a matter of connecting it?

    Thanks
    Safety123@aol.com
     
  2. Richard in AZ

    Richard in AZ Flightless Bird

    First, you should read up on how to "jumper" the hard drives to configure the original drive as a
    master and the second drive as a slave. Some brands of Hard drive have to be jumpered for "Master
    Only" or for "Master with Slave". Setting them for "Cable Select" is the easiest option and then
    the master is connected to the end of the cable and the slave to the second connection on the cable.
    (Your IDE cable does have two connectors doesn't it? IDE is assumed for a 2002 computer)

    Second you should read up on how to "Partition" the new drive and then how to "Format" it.
    In XP, a good tool is the "disk management" feature.

    Third, did you check to see if you have a physical bracket to mount the second drive. A lot of
    Dell computers do not provide that option without buying a special bracket.

    "Safety123" <safety123@invalid.aol.com> wrote in message
    news:btqos59idofe8l734onria96m83pgetjgt@4ax.com...
    >I have a Pentium 4 2.26 GHZ with one gig ram with a WD Caviar 80 gig
    > 800 JB. Hard drive is 2006, computer is 2002.
    >
    > I ordered a similar hard drive and wish to add it. How hard will it
    > be? Is it just a matter of connecting it?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Safety123@aol.com
     
  3. Mark Adams

    Mark Adams Flightless Bird

    "Safety123" wrote:

    > I have a Pentium 4 2.26 GHZ with one gig ram with a WD Caviar 80 gig
    > 800 JB. Hard drive is 2006, computer is 2002.
    >
    > I ordered a similar hard drive and wish to add it. How hard will it
    > be? Is it just a matter of connecting it?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Safety123@aol.com
    > .
    >


    If you are adding it just for additional storage space, yes just connect the
    cables and it should be good to go. The new drive is undoubtedly SATA; make
    sure that your older machine has SATA ports to connect to. If not, you will
    have to add a SATA controller card to an available PCI slot.

    If you wish to move the operating system and applications to the new drive,
    you will need to clone the old drive to the new one. Most hard drive makers
    have a cloning utility included in the box with the new drive. You can also
    check their website for a cloning utility that you can download. There is
    also a trial version of Acronis True Image that I believe can also perform
    the cloning.
     
  4. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 07:45:07 -0700, Safety123
    <safety123@invalid.aol.com> wrote:

    > I have a Pentium 4 2.26 GHZ with one gig ram with a WD Caviar 80 gig
    > 800 JB. Hard drive is 2006, computer is 2002.
    >
    > I ordered a similar hard drive and wish to add it.



    You're buying another 80GB drive? These days that's absolutely tiny.
    For very little more money, you could have gotten one double the size.


    > How hard will it
    > be? Is it just a matter of connecting it?



    Assuming that there is room in the case, and you have spare connectors
    available, it's very easy. You need to do the following:

    1. Mount it in your case with screws.

    2. Plug in a power cable.

    3. Plug in a data cable.

    4. Correctly set the jumpers on the new drive and any other drive on
    the same cable (probably).

    5. Format the drive.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  5. Safety123

    Safety123 Flightless Bird

    The new drive is 22-136-457 HD 80G|WD 7K 8M ATA100 WD800AAJB
    My first drive is acting flaky so I would like to clone them

    Thank you
    safety123@aol.com


    On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 08:42:01 -0700, Mark Adams
    <MarkAdams@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >
    >
    >"Safety123" wrote:
    >
    >> I have a Pentium 4 2.26 GHZ with one gig ram with a WD Caviar 80 gig
    >> 800 JB. Hard drive is 2006, computer is 2002.
    >>
    >> I ordered a similar hard drive and wish to add it. How hard will it
    >> be? Is it just a matter of connecting it?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> Safety123@aol.com
    >> .
    >>

    >
    >If you are adding it just for additional storage space, yes just connect the
    >cables and it should be good to go. The new drive is undoubtedly SATA; make
    >sure that your older machine has SATA ports to connect to. If not, you will
    >have to add a SATA controller card to an available PCI slot.
    >
    >If you wish to move the operating system and applications to the new drive,
    >you will need to clone the old drive to the new one. Most hard drive makers
    >have a cloning utility included in the box with the new drive. You can also
    >check their website for a cloning utility that you can download. There is
    >also a trial version of Acronis True Image that I believe can also perform
    >the cloning.
     
  6. Safety123

    Safety123 Flightless Bird

    I know I could have bought a bigger drive, but I'll never use all that
    disk space. I have a MacBook Pro also. It's my main computer.

    On the afore mentioned computer, I also need to replace the DVD drive
    (I think)
    The tray won't stay closed when I put a DVD in.

    safety123@aol.com

    On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 09:54:45 -0700, "Ken Blake, MVP"
    <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote:

    >On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 07:45:07 -0700, Safety123
    ><safety123@invalid.aol.com> wrote:
    >
    >> I have a Pentium 4 2.26 GHZ with one gig ram with a WD Caviar 80 gig
    >> 800 JB. Hard drive is 2006, computer is 2002.
    >>
    >> I ordered a similar hard drive and wish to add it.

    >
    >
    >You're buying another 80GB drive? These days that's absolutely tiny.
    >For very little more money, you could have gotten one double the size.
    >
    >
    >> How hard will it
    >> be? Is it just a matter of connecting it?

    >
    >
    >Assuming that there is room in the case, and you have spare connectors
    >available, it's very easy. You need to do the following:
    >
    >1. Mount it in your case with screws.
    >
    >2. Plug in a power cable.
    >
    >3. Plug in a data cable.
    >
    >4. Correctly set the jumpers on the new drive and any other drive on
    >the same cable (probably).
    >
    >5. Format the drive.
     
  7. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    Safety123 wrote:
    > The new drive is 22-136-457 HD 80G|WD 7K 8M ATA100 WD800AAJB
    > My first drive is acting flaky so I would like to clone them
    >
    > Thank you
    > safety123@aol.com
    >
    >
    > On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 08:42:01 -0700, Mark Adams
    > <MarkAdams@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Safety123" wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have a Pentium 4 2.26 GHZ with one gig ram with a WD Caviar 80 gig
    >>> 800 JB. Hard drive is 2006, computer is 2002.
    >>>
    >>> I ordered a similar hard drive and wish to add it. How hard will it
    >>> be? Is it just a matter of connecting it?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks
    >>> Safety123@aol.com
    >>> .
    >>>

    >> If you are adding it just for additional storage space, yes just connect the
    >> cables and it should be good to go. The new drive is undoubtedly SATA; make
    >> sure that your older machine has SATA ports to connect to. If not, you will
    >> have to add a SATA controller card to an available PCI slot.
    >>
    >> If you wish to move the operating system and applications to the new drive,
    >> you will need to clone the old drive to the new one. Most hard drive makers
    >> have a cloning utility included in the box with the new drive. You can also
    >> check their website for a cloning utility that you can download. There is
    >> also a trial version of Acronis True Image that I believe can also perform
    >> the cloning.


    Mark made an incorrect assumption about the type of drive you bought.
    You bought a PATA drive, which is the correct type for your old
    computer. I won't repeat Ken's comment about drive size, to which you've
    already replied, but your decision seems a bit penny wise, pound foolish.

    Western Digital has some helpful tutorials (these are the ones for you,
    even though your particular drive isn't listed):
    http://support.wdc.com/product/install.asp?modelno=wd800aajb&x=8&y=15

    If you intend to *replace* your existing drive with the new one, you
    will want to "clone" the old drive onto the new one. Western Digital
    supplies a free version of Acronis True Image to do this:
    http://support.wdc.com/product/downloaddetail.asp?swid=119&wdc_lang=en

    Often, it's a bit simpler to do the cloning operation with the new drive
    attached in an external USB case -- but that involves a small amount of
    additional expense (although later, you can put the original drive in
    the external case and use it for a backup drive). If you install the
    new drive as a secondary (slave) drive inside your computer, triple
    check to make sure which is the *source* drive (your old one) and which
    is the *target* drive (the new one) *before* you start the cloning
    operation. Note that you do not have to partition or format the new
    drive if you are going do a cloning operation.
    How to:
    http://wdc.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/wdc...new_search=1&p_search_type=answers.search_fnl

    The following is a bit old, but is from a poster in the XP newsgroups --
    Anna -- who is extremely knowledgeable about cloning and disk imaging.
    It is based on an older version of the commercial Acronis product, but
    the interface should be very similar to what you'll see with the WD free
    version.
    *VERY IMPORTANT: read the "NOTE" after step 13.*

    <QUOTE from Anna>
    Step-by-Step Instructions for Using the Acronis True Image Program to
    Backup & Restore One's Hard Drive...

    Using the Acronis True Image program there are two different approaches
    one can take to back up the entire contents of one's day-to-day working
    HDD, i.e., the operating system, all programs & applications, and
    user-created data - in short, *everything* that's on one's HDD...

    1. Direct disk-to-disk cloning, or,
    2. Creating disk images

    By using either of these strategies the user can restore his or her
    system should their day-to-day working HDD become inoperable because of
    mechanical/electronic failure of the disk or corruption of the system
    resulting in a dysfunctional operating system.

    In undertaking either of these two backup & recovery processes you're
    dealing with two hard drives - the so-called source & destination disks
    - the source disk being the HDD you're backing up and the destination
    disk being the HDD that will be the recipient of the cloned contents of
    the source disk or the recipient of the disk image you will be creating.

    When using either process it's usually best for most users to use an
    external HDD as the destination drive, i.e., the recipient of the cloned
    contents of the source disk or the recipient of the created disk image.
    This can be either a USB or Firewire or SATA external HDD. While another
    internal HDD can also serve as the destination disk there's an
    additional element of safety in using an external HDD since that drive
    will be ordinarily disconnected from the system except during the disk
    cloning or recovery process.

    One other suggestion. After you install the Acronis program on your
    computer it's a good idea to create what Acronis calls their "Bootable
    Rescue Media"(CD). In most cases the recovery process (described below)
    will utilize that Acronis bootable CD to restore your system. This
    "rescue" CD is easily created from the program by clicking on the
    "Create Bootable Rescue Media" icon on the opening Acronis screen and
    simply going through the screens to create the bootable CD. The
    following are step-by-step instructions for using the Acronis True Image
    9 program to clone the contents of one HDD to an external HDD. (The
    steps are essentially the same using the newer ATI 10 version):

    1. With both hard drives (source & destination disks) connected, boot
    up. Ensure that no other storage devices, e.g., flash drives, ZIP
    drives, etc., are connected. It's also probably a good idea to shut down
    any programs you may have working in the background - including any
    anti-virus anti-spyware programs - before undertaking this disk-to-disk
    cloning operation.

    2. Access the Acronis True Image 9 program and under "Pick a Task",
    click on "Clone Disk". (In the ATI 10 version click on "Manage Hard
    Disks" in the "Pick a Tool" area and on the next screen click on "Clone
    Disk").

    3. On the next "Welcome to the Disk Clone Wizard!" window, click Next.

    4. On the next "Clone Mode" window select the Automatic option (it
    should be the default option selected) and click Next.

    5. On the next "Source Hard Disk" window, ensure that the correct
    source HDD (the disk you're cloning from) has been selected (click to
    highlight). Click Next.

    6. On the next "Destination Hard Disk" window, ensure that the correct
    destination HDD (the disk you're cloning to) has been selected (again,
    click to highlight). Click Next.

    7. On the next window, select the option "Delete partitions on the
    destination hard disk". Understand that all data presently on the disk
    that will be the recipient of the clone will be deleted prior to the
    disk cloning operation. Click Next.

    8. The next window will reflect the source and destination disks.
    Again, confirm that the correct drives have been selected. Click Next.

    9. On the next window click on the Proceed button. A message box will
    display indicating that a reboot will be required to undertake the disk
    cloning operation. Click Reboot.

    10. The cloning operation will proceed during the reboot. With modern
    components and a medium to high-powered processor, data transfer rate
    will be somewhere in the range of about 450 MB/min to 800 MB/min when
    cloning to a USB external HDD; considerably faster when cloning to
    another internal HDD.

    11. When the disk cloning operation has been completed, a message will
    (usually) appear indicating the disk cloning process has been successful
    and instructs you to shut down the computer by pressing any key. Do so
    and disconnect your USB external HDD. If, however, the destination drive
    (the recipient of the clone) has been another *internal* HDD, see the
    NOTE below.

    12. Note that the cloned contents now residing on the USB external HDD
    take on the file system of the source drive. For example, if prior to
    the disk-cloning operation your USB external HDD had been
    FAT32-formatted and your XP OS was NTFS-formatted, the cloned contents
    will be NTFS-formatted. There is no need to format the USB external HDD
    prior to the disk-cloning operation. Similarly, there is no need prior
    to the disk-cloning operation to format an internal HDD should you be
    using an internal HDD as the destination drive .

    13. Restoration of the system can be achieved by cloning the contents of
    the data residing on the external HDD to an internal HDD through the
    normal disk-cloning process as described above.

    NOTE: Just one other point that should be emphasized with respect to the
    disk cloning operation should the recipient of the clone be another
    internal HDD and not a USB or Firewire external HDD. Immediately
    following the disk cloning operation the machine should be shutdown and
    the source HDD should be disconnected. Boot ONLY to the newly-cloned
    drive. DO NOT BOOT IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE CLONING OPERATION WITH BOTH
    DRIVES CONNECTED. There's a strong possibility that by doing so it is
    likely to cause future boot problems with the cloned drive. Obviously
    there is no problem in this area should a USB or Firewire EHD be the
    recipient of the clone since that device is not ordinarily bootable in
    an XP environment.

    [portions dealing with disk imaging and recovery omitted]

    <\QUOTE from Anna>

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
  8. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Ken Blake, MVP wrote:
    > On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 07:45:07 -0700, Safety123
    > <safety123@invalid.aol.com> wrote:
    >
    >> I have a Pentium 4 2.26 GHZ with one gig ram with a WD Caviar 80 gig
    >> 800 JB. Hard drive is 2006, computer is 2002.
    >>
    >> I ordered a similar hard drive and wish to add it.

    >
    >
    > You're buying another 80GB drive? These days that's absolutely tiny.
    > For very little more money, you could have gotten one double the size.
    >


    I suspect he is trying to tell us, the computer has ribbon
    cable interfaces (2002), and he is adding another
    IDE ribbon cable drive, small enough as to not run into
    48 bit LBA problems. Just a matter of getting the Master/Slave/CS
    jumpering right, finding a spare IDE connector to connect to
    on one of the two ribbon cables. If the disk manufacturer has
    downloadable cloning software, then it may even be possible to
    transfer everything with zero fuss.

    (He says the new drive is WD800AAJB. Only $40.)

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136457&Tpk=WD800AAJB

    To add a SATA drive, might require an add-in PCI card on an
    older machine. That may allow larger drives to be used, but it
    is hard to find nice PCI cards for that purpose. You can still
    buy them, but not all the ones available are winners.

    The only word of warning, with regard to cloning, is to remember
    to disconnect the original disk, the first time that the computer
    boots WinXP from the clone drive. Once the computer has booted at
    least once with the clone, you can connect the old drive up again
    later. That is a nuisance with IDE, due to the jumpering, using
    the proper connector for a single drive and so on. If you have a
    single drive on an IDE cable, it goes on the end connector, NOT the middle one.

    Paul
     
  9. Rich

    Rich Flightless Bird

    "Safety123" <safety123@invalid.aol.com> wrote in message
    news:vqcps5dukfi19qemt7kicfvqmn00mm1bu7@4ax.com...
    > The new drive is 22-136-457 HD 80G|WD 7K 8M ATA100 WD800AAJB
    > My first drive is acting flaky so I would like to clone them
    >
    > Thank you
    > safety123@aol.com
    >
    >
    > On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 08:42:01 -0700, Mark Adams
    > <MarkAdams@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>"Safety123" wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have a Pentium 4 2.26 GHZ with one gig ram with a WD Caviar 80 gig
    >>> 800 JB. Hard drive is 2006, computer is 2002.
    >>>
    >>> I ordered a similar hard drive and wish to add it. How hard will it
    >>> be? Is it just a matter of connecting it?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks
    >>> Safety123@aol.com
    >>> .
    >>>

    >>
    >>If you are adding it just for additional storage space, yes just connect
    >>the
    >>cables and it should be good to go. The new drive is undoubtedly SATA;
    >>make
    >>sure that your older machine has SATA ports to connect to. If not, you
    >>will
    >>have to add a SATA controller card to an available PCI slot.
    >>
    >>If you wish to move the operating system and applications to the new
    >>drive,
    >>you will need to clone the old drive to the new one. Most hard drive
    >>makers
    >>have a cloning utility included in the box with the new drive. You can
    >>also
    >>check their website for a cloning utility that you can download. There is
    >>also a trial version of Acronis True Image that I believe can also perform
    >>the cloning.

    >
    > __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus
    > signature database 5036 (20100417) __________
    >
    > The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.
    >
    > http://www.eset.com
    >
    >
    >


    If you have time to cancel that order, I would consider buying a larger
    size. For about the same price of an 80G ATA drive, you can get a 250g
    drive. I was always curious why on-line sellers still list the 80G for the
    same price as a 250G, wondering who would buy it. I recently purchased a WD
    250G ATA drive from ZIPZOOMFLY for about $58 to upgrade a very old system
    (older than your Dell).
    Rich


    __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 5036 (20100417) __________

    The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

    http://www.eset.com
     
  10. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird

    "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    news:-OCvSBUA4KHA.4332@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    (SNIP)...
    > The following is a bit old, but is from a poster in the XP newsgroups --
    > Anna -- who is extremely knowledgeable about cloning and disk imaging. It
    > is based on an older version of the commercial Acronis product, but the
    > interface should be very similar to what you'll see with the WD free
    > version.
    > *VERY IMPORTANT: read the "NOTE" after step 13.*
    >
    > <QUOTE from Anna>
    > Step-by-Step Instructions for Using the Acronis True Image Program to
    > Backup & Restore One's Hard Drive...
    >
    > Using the Acronis True Image program there are two different approaches
    > one can take to back up the entire contents of one's day-to-day working
    > HDD, i.e., the operating system, all programs & applications, and
    > user-created data - in short, *everything* that's on one's HDD...
    >
    > 1. Direct disk-to-disk cloning, or,
    > 2. Creating disk images

    (SNIP)...
    > NOTE: Just one other point that should be emphasized with respect to the
    > disk cloning operation should the recipient of the clone be another
    > internal HDD and not a USB or Firewire external HDD. Immediately following
    > the disk cloning operation the machine should be shutdown and the source
    > HDD should be disconnected. Boot ONLY to the newly-cloned drive. DO NOT
    > BOOT IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE CLONING OPERATION WITH BOTH DRIVES
    > CONNECTED. There's a strong possibility that by doing so it is likely to
    > cause future boot problems with the cloned drive. Obviously there is no
    > problem in this area should a USB or Firewire EHD be the recipient of the
    > clone since that device is not ordinarily bootable in an XP environment.
    >
    > <\QUOTE from Anna>
    >
    > --
    > Lem
    >
    > Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    > http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html



    Lem:
    As you possibly may know from my previous posts re this issue of
    disk-cloning/disk-imaging, I'm a rather passionate supporter of the Casper 6
    disk-cloning program and strongly recommend that program for most PC users
    as a comprehensive backup tool.

    (I recognize this is probably of little interest to the OP since I take it
    he/she is primarily or exclusively concerned with just cloning the contents
    of his/her (apparently) failing HDD to a newer HDD. And it appears he/she
    may have other problems as well!)

    The reason for this post is in connection with my cautionary "NOTE" (above
    quoted) with respect to the ATI program. I wanted to mention that one of the
    principal reasons we prefer the Casper program to other disk-cloning
    programs (such as the Acronis one) is that unlike those other programs
    Casper completely avoids that potential problem that I referred to.

    Over the past two years or so since we began working with the Casper
    disk-cloning program we've performed (or have been involved with) hundreds
    of disk-cloning operations involving a wide variety of PC makes/models, HDDs
    (both PATA & SATA), etc. During that time we have never encountered a
    *single* occurrence of the problem alluded to. That is to say a user could
    clone the contents of his/her "source" HDD to another *internal* HDD and
    there would be no (possible) subsequent problem affecting the boot
    capability of the destination (cloned) HDD even when the system was booted
    to the source HDD with the cloned HDD connected *immediately* following the
    disk-cloning operation.

    Under that scenario the cloned HDD would of course be treated as a secondary
    HDD with a drive letter assignment of (obviously) other than C:. However,
    should the source HDD be later disconnected so that the boot would involve
    *only* the newly cloned HDD, that drive would boot without incident an be
    assigned the "normal" drive letter assignment of C:.

    Furthermore, should both HDDs be connected in the system and the user
    changes the setting of the BIOS boot priority order to accommodate a first
    boot to the cloned HDD, similarly that HDD will boot without incident. And,
    of course, the former source HDD would then be treated by the system as a
    secondary HDD as would be expected under those circumstances.

    And should (for some reason) the user decide to boot to the original source
    HDD at some subsequent time, the boot to that drive would proceed normally.

    I thought the above info might be of some interest to you & others.
    Anna
     
  11. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    Anna wrote:
    > "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    > news:-OCvSBUA4KHA.4332@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > (SNIP)...
    >> The following is a bit old, but is from a poster in the XP newsgroups --
    >> Anna -- who is extremely knowledgeable about cloning and disk imaging. It
    >> is based on an older version of the commercial Acronis product, but the
    >> interface should be very similar to what you'll see with the WD free
    >> version.
    >> *VERY IMPORTANT: read the "NOTE" after step 13.*
    >>
    >> <QUOTE from Anna>
    >> Step-by-Step Instructions for Using the Acronis True Image Program to
    >> Backup & Restore One's Hard Drive...
    >>
    >> Using the Acronis True Image program there are two different approaches
    >> one can take to back up the entire contents of one's day-to-day working
    >> HDD, i.e., the operating system, all programs & applications, and
    >> user-created data - in short, *everything* that's on one's HDD...
    >>
    >> 1. Direct disk-to-disk cloning, or,
    >> 2. Creating disk images

    > (SNIP)...
    >> NOTE: Just one other point that should be emphasized with respect to the
    >> disk cloning operation should the recipient of the clone be another
    >> internal HDD and not a USB or Firewire external HDD. Immediately following
    >> the disk cloning operation the machine should be shutdown and the source
    >> HDD should be disconnected. Boot ONLY to the newly-cloned drive. DO NOT
    >> BOOT IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE CLONING OPERATION WITH BOTH DRIVES
    >> CONNECTED. There's a strong possibility that by doing so it is likely to
    >> cause future boot problems with the cloned drive. Obviously there is no
    >> problem in this area should a USB or Firewire EHD be the recipient of the
    >> clone since that device is not ordinarily bootable in an XP environment.
    >>
    >> <\QUOTE from Anna>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem
    >>
    >> Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    >> http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html

    >
    >
    > Lem:
    > As you possibly may know from my previous posts re this issue of
    > disk-cloning/disk-imaging, I'm a rather passionate supporter of the Casper 6
    > disk-cloning program and strongly recommend that program for most PC users
    > as a comprehensive backup tool.
    >
    > (I recognize this is probably of little interest to the OP since I take it
    > he/she is primarily or exclusively concerned with just cloning the contents
    > of his/her (apparently) failing HDD to a newer HDD. And it appears he/she
    > may have other problems as well!)
    >
    > The reason for this post is in connection with my cautionary "NOTE" (above
    > quoted) with respect to the ATI program. I wanted to mention that one of the
    > principal reasons we prefer the Casper program to other disk-cloning
    > programs (such as the Acronis one) is that unlike those other programs
    > Casper completely avoids that potential problem that I referred to.
    >
    > Over the past two years or so since we began working with the Casper
    > disk-cloning program we've performed (or have been involved with) hundreds
    > of disk-cloning operations involving a wide variety of PC makes/models, HDDs
    > (both PATA & SATA), etc. During that time we have never encountered a
    > *single* occurrence of the problem alluded to. That is to say a user could
    > clone the contents of his/her "source" HDD to another *internal* HDD and
    > there would be no (possible) subsequent problem affecting the boot
    > capability of the destination (cloned) HDD even when the system was booted
    > to the source HDD with the cloned HDD connected *immediately* following the
    > disk-cloning operation.
    >
    > Under that scenario the cloned HDD would of course be treated as a secondary
    > HDD with a drive letter assignment of (obviously) other than C:. However,
    > should the source HDD be later disconnected so that the boot would involve
    > *only* the newly cloned HDD, that drive would boot without incident an be
    > assigned the "normal" drive letter assignment of C:.
    >
    > Furthermore, should both HDDs be connected in the system and the user
    > changes the setting of the BIOS boot priority order to accommodate a first
    > boot to the cloned HDD, similarly that HDD will boot without incident. And,
    > of course, the former source HDD would then be treated by the system as a
    > secondary HDD as would be expected under those circumstances.
    >
    > And should (for some reason) the user decide to boot to the original source
    > HDD at some subsequent time, the boot to that drive would proceed normally.
    >
    > I thought the above info might be of some interest to you & others.
    > Anna
    >
    >


    Anna -

    Thanks.

    As you can tell, I think highly of your posts (and save them for others).

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     

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