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Safely remove?

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by Alex Clayton, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Flightless Bird

    Safely remove?
    In playing around with a couple external drives on a couple Win.7 machines
    today I noticed the safely remove seems to be gone? I never used it on my
    Vista anyway, but when I was looking at something else on the right click
    menu I noticed it was not there. Did they move it, or just decide that you
    don't need to use it any more?
    --
    To err is human.....
    But to blame someone else shows management potential.
     
  2. Stubbo of Oz

    Stubbo of Oz Flightless Bird

    On Tue, 5 Jan 2010 19:41:28 -0800, "Alex Clayton"
    <Alexx1400@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >Safely remove?
    > In playing around with a couple external drives on a couple Win.7 machines
    >today I noticed the safely remove seems to be gone? I never used it on my
    >Vista anyway, but when I was looking at something else on the right click
    >menu I noticed it was not there. Did they move it, or just decide that you
    >don't need to use it any more?


    Its present in my Win 7 system - but in the systray's hidden icons.

    Its also in the right click menu with the name "Eject"





    --
    ----------------
    Stubbo of Oz
    ----------------
     
  3. R. C. White

    R. C. White Flightless Bird

    Hi, Alex.

    In Disk Management, right-click on that Disk # - NOT on the volume letter -
    and click Policies. Is it set to Optimize for quick removal? Or for
    performance? If it is optimized for quick removal, you probably won't see -
    or need - the "safely remove" button. The cache will be quickly emptied
    after every write, so the drive can be removed immediately without risk of
    loss of not-yet-written data.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@grandecom.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64

    "Alex Clayton" <Alexx1400@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:SYadnVD3i-z6m9nWnZ2dnUVZ_tWdnZ2d@nventure.com...
    > Safely remove?
    > In playing around with a couple external drives on a couple Win.7
    > machines today I noticed the safely remove seems to be gone? I never used
    > it on my Vista anyway, but when I was looking at something else on the
    > right click menu I noticed it was not there. Did they move it, or just
    > decide that you don't need to use it any more?
     
  4. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Flightless Bird

    "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
    news:26OdnepHpKiUhdnWnZ2dnUVZ_hednZ2d@posted.grandecom...
    > Hi, Alex.
    >
    > In Disk Management, right-click on that Disk # - NOT on the volume
    > letter - and click Policies. Is it set to Optimize for quick removal? Or
    > for performance? If it is optimized for quick removal, you probably won't
    > see - or need - the "safely remove" button. The cache will be quickly
    > emptied after every write, so the drive can be removed immediately without
    > risk of loss of not-yet-written data.
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    > rc@grandecom.net
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64
    >
    >


    I don't know where disk management is? I just plugged one I had been using
    in again, it still does not show on the right click menu like it did in
    Vista, so I guess it's set to not need it. I never used it anyway, I was
    just curious as to why it was no longer there.
    --
    There are three kinds of men: The ones that learn by reading. The few who
    learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence and
    find out for themselves.
    Will Rogers
     
  5. R. C. White

    R. C. White Flightless Bird

    Hi, Alex.

    > I don't know where disk management is?


    Ever since Windows 2000, Disk Management has been THE tool to manage disks -
    and anything else that can be assigned a "drive" letter, including thumb
    drives, card readers, digital cameras, network drives... But Microsoft
    buried access to DM (same initials as Device Manager, but NOT the same
    thing!) under so many mouse-clicks that even many Windows veterans haven't
    found it yet, 9 years later. :>(

    The official way for newbies to reach Disk Management in Win7 is: Start |
    Control Panel | Administrative Tools | Computer Management | Disk
    Management. But this opens DM inside the Microsoft Management Console, with
    so much other stuff around it that I feel like I'm working through a
    keyhole. :>(

    My favorite way is simply to click Start, type diskmgmt.msc, and press
    Enter.

    Either way, you'll need to furnish Administrator credentials because you
    might be doing some serious work on the computer system. And, either way,
    Maximize the window and the Status column so that you can actually see what
    it's trying to tell you. (Sadly, these settings are not "sticky" and you'll
    have to adjust them again each time you start DM.) By default, DM shows the
    Volume List at the top and the Graphical View at the bottom; both tell us a
    LOT and they complement each other.

    Note that the Volume List is organized alphabetically, including the Name
    (label) of each volume, if you have created a name for it. (I highly
    recommend creating a name for each volume; just right-click on the volume,
    choose Properties and type the name you want into the box at the top. This
    gets written to the disk and does not change if you re-assign drive letters,
    either intentionally or unintentionally by connecting or disconnecting
    devices.)

    The Graphical View is arranged by device, starting with HDDs, which it
    refers to by Disk NUMBER, starting with Disk 0, not by letters. On each
    disk, it shows all the partitions that have been created. After the HDDs,
    it lists Removable devices, such as thumb drives, and then CD/DVD drives.
    Right-click on the far-left column to see the context menu with Properties
    at the bottom. The next screen should include a Policies tab for removable
    devices, but not for fixed HDDs.

    Disk Management is one of my favorite utilities. It can do so much - but
    few users have discovered it. :>(

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@grandecom.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64

    "Alex Clayton" <Alexx1400@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:-OaWdnY_sX8sCr9nWnZ2dnUVZ_iydnZ2d@nventure.com...
    > "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
    > news:26OdnepHpKiUhdnWnZ2dnUVZ_hednZ2d@posted.grandecom...
    >> Hi, Alex.
    >>
    >> In Disk Management, right-click on that Disk # - NOT on the volume
    >> letter - and click Policies. Is it set to Optimize for quick removal?
    >> Or for performance? If it is optimized for quick removal, you probably
    >> won't see - or need - the "safely remove" button. The cache will be
    >> quickly emptied after every write, so the drive can be removed
    >> immediately without risk of loss of not-yet-written data.
    >>
    >> RC

    >
    > I don't know where disk management is? I just plugged one I had been using
    > in again, it still does not show on the right click menu like it did in
    > Vista, so I guess it's set to not need it. I never used it anyway, I was
    > just curious as to why it was no longer there.
     
  6. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Flightless Bird

    "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
    news:tsadnR2NutgVItnWnZ2dnUVZ_gCdnZ2d@posted.grandecom...
    > Hi, Alex.
    >
    >> I don't know where disk management is?

    >
    > Ever since Windows 2000, Disk Management has been THE tool to manage
    > disks - and anything else that can be assigned a "drive" letter, including
    > thumb drives, card readers, digital cameras, network drives... But
    > Microsoft buried access to DM (same initials as Device Manager, but NOT
    > the same thing!) under so many mouse-clicks that even many Windows
    > veterans haven't found it yet, 9 years later. :>(
    >
    > The official way for newbies to reach Disk Management in Win7 is: Start |
    > Control Panel | Administrative Tools | Computer Management | Disk
    > Management. But this opens DM inside the Microsoft Management Console,
    > with so much other stuff around it that I feel like I'm working through a
    > keyhole. :>(
    >
    > My favorite way is simply to click Start, type diskmgmt.msc, and press
    > Enter.
    >
    > Either way, you'll need to furnish Administrator credentials because you
    > might be doing some serious work on the computer system. And, either way,
    > Maximize the window and the Status column so that you can actually see
    > what it's trying to tell you. (Sadly, these settings are not "sticky" and
    > you'll have to adjust them again each time you start DM.) By default, DM
    > shows the Volume List at the top and the Graphical View at the bottom;
    > both tell us a LOT and they complement each other.
    >
    > Note that the Volume List is organized alphabetically, including the Name
    > (label) of each volume, if you have created a name for it. (I highly
    > recommend creating a name for each volume; just right-click on the volume,
    > choose Properties and type the name you want into the box at the top.
    > This gets written to the disk and does not change if you re-assign drive
    > letters, either intentionally or unintentionally by connecting or
    > disconnecting devices.)
    >
    > The Graphical View is arranged by device, starting with HDDs, which it
    > refers to by Disk NUMBER, starting with Disk 0, not by letters. On each
    > disk, it shows all the partitions that have been created. After the HDDs,
    > it lists Removable devices, such as thumb drives, and then CD/DVD drives.
    > Right-click on the far-left column to see the context menu with Properties
    > at the bottom. The next screen should include a Policies tab for
    > removable devices, but not for fixed HDDs.
    >
    > Disk Management is one of my favorite utilities. It can do so much - but
    > few users have discovered it. :>(
    >
    >


    Damn!! I guess I will just leave it alone if I have to do that to get at it.
    Sounds like someone like me could get into trouble with it. <G>
    --
    Things get better with age. I'm approaching magnificent!!
     
  7. R. C. White

    R. C. White Flightless Bird

    Hi, Alex.

    > I guess I will just leave it alone if I have to do that to get at it.


    You must have missed this line:

    >> My favorite way is simply to click Start, type diskmgmt.msc, and press
    >> Enter.


    It's well worth the investment of time! You will reap dividends, not just
    for today or this week, but for as long as you keep using computers - which
    might be for the rest of your life.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@grandecom.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64

    "Alex Clayton" <Alexx1400@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:maCdnbZEFPtPW9nWnZ2dnUVZ_rudnZ2d@nventure.com...
    > "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
    > news:tsadnR2NutgVItnWnZ2dnUVZ_gCdnZ2d@posted.grandecom...
    >> Hi, Alex.
    >>
    >>> I don't know where disk management is?

    >>
    >> Ever since Windows 2000, Disk Management has been THE tool to manage
    >> disks - and anything else that can be assigned a "drive" letter,
    >> including thumb drives, card readers, digital cameras, network drives...
    >> But Microsoft buried access to DM (same initials as Device Manager, but
    >> NOT the same thing!) under so many mouse-clicks that even many Windows
    >> veterans haven't found it yet, 9 years later. :>(
    >>
    >> The official way for newbies to reach Disk Management in Win7 is: Start
    >> | Control Panel | Administrative Tools | Computer Management | Disk
    >> Management. But this opens DM inside the Microsoft Management Console,
    >> with so much other stuff around it that I feel like I'm working through a
    >> keyhole. :>(
    >>
    >> My favorite way is simply to click Start, type diskmgmt.msc, and press
    >> Enter.
    >>
    >> Either way, you'll need to furnish Administrator credentials because you
    >> might be doing some serious work on the computer system. And, either
    >> way, Maximize the window and the Status column so that you can actually
    >> see what it's trying to tell you. (Sadly, these settings are not
    >> "sticky" and you'll have to adjust them again each time you start DM.)
    >> By default, DM shows the Volume List at the top and the Graphical View at
    >> the bottom; both tell us a LOT and they complement each other.
    >>
    >> Note that the Volume List is organized alphabetically, including the Name
    >> (label) of each volume, if you have created a name for it. (I highly
    >> recommend creating a name for each volume; just right-click on the
    >> volume, choose Properties and type the name you want into the box at the
    >> top. This gets written to the disk and does not change if you re-assign
    >> drive letters, either intentionally or unintentionally by connecting or
    >> disconnecting devices.)
    >>
    >> The Graphical View is arranged by device, starting with HDDs, which it
    >> refers to by Disk NUMBER, starting with Disk 0, not by letters. On each
    >> disk, it shows all the partitions that have been created. After the
    >> HDDs, it lists Removable devices, such as thumb drives, and then CD/DVD
    >> drives. Right-click on the far-left column to see the context menu with
    >> Properties at the bottom. The next screen should include a Policies tab
    >> for removable devices, but not for fixed HDDs.
    >>
    >> Disk Management is one of my favorite utilities. It can do so much - but
    >> few users have discovered it. :>(
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Damn!! I guess I will just leave it alone if I have to do that to get at
    > it. Sounds like someone like me could get into trouble with it. <G>
     
  8. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Flightless Bird

    "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
    news:eek:JednZxVPZGDYNnWnZ2dnUVZ_h6dnZ2d@posted.grandecom...
    > Hi, Alex.
    >
    >> I guess I will just leave it alone if I have to do that to get at it.

    >
    > You must have missed this line:
    >
    >>> My favorite way is simply to click Start, type diskmgmt.msc, and press
    >>> Enter.

    >
    > It's well worth the investment of time! You will reap dividends, not just
    > for today or this week, but for as long as you keep using computers -
    > which might be for the rest of your life.
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    > rc@grandecom.net
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64
    >
    >


    Yes I did miss that. I was reading the other steps and all I could think of
    was all the ways I could screw something up trying. <G>
    I just opened it from the start menu, plugged in one of the ED's.
    Has a whole page of "stuff" nothing I have any clue what to do with though.
    I have no idea what most of the stuff it's showing even means. I know it's
    FAT32 and understand the percentage used and free, but there is a lot of
    other stuff there I have no idea what it means. I guess if it is ever
    screwed up, and I can remember this, I know how to get to the page anyway.
    I went back to your previous post and did manage to find what you were
    talking about, and it is set for quick removal, not better performance. I
    had never heard of or seen this before.
    Is there any real up side to the better performance? Does that mean it
    works faster?

    --
    Things get better with age. I'm approaching magnificent!!
     
  9. R. C. White

    R. C. White Flightless Bird

    Hi, Alex.

    As I said, Microsoft originally buried DM so deeply that even many experts
    never found it. More users know about it now, but still too few. And, yes,
    like any powerful tool, it can do harm as well as good if not used
    carefully. That's why it won't run without specific Administrator approval.
    But if you run it often, as I do, you might want to create a shortcut and,
    in the shortcut's Properties, click Advanced and Run as administrator, so
    that you don't have to see the prompt each time. I don't really recommend
    this because it probably is best to be reminded each time.

    > Is there any real up side to the better performance? Does that mean it
    > works faster?


    As usual, "it depends". You probably are familiar with the workings of a
    cache or buffer system. As an example, when trying to pump 20 gallons of
    water through a pipe that can only move 1 gallon per minute, the pump is
    going to be busy for 20 minutes, even if the pipe could pump out 10 gallons
    per minute. But if you put a 20-gallon holding tank between the pump and
    the small pipe, the pump could fill that tank in 2 minutes and then go on to
    a different job while the small pipe slowly empties the holding tank.

    Your computer's hard drive cache is like the holding tank. Your fast CPU
    can send data many times faster than your thumb drive - or even your hard
    drive - can write it to the disk. With caching turned on, the CPU can send
    the data and then turn its attention to other matters while the drive writes
    the data - quickly, but not nearly as quickly as the CPU sent it. If you
    unplug the device before the cache is fully written, you will lose some of
    the data.

    So, if you do a lot of large writes to the disk (when backing up a big
    partition, for example), you could lose a lot of unwritten data by "pulling
    the plug" too soon. But if everything you send to the device is in short
    bursts, such as when you are manually updating a database, there's not much
    danger of loss - and not much gain from using the cache, anyhow. The write
    cache is not very big, so it typically gets emptied in a second - or less.
    (No, I don't really know how big it is.)

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@grandecom.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64

    "Alex Clayton" <Alexx1400@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:fYOdnYutq9zKndjWnZ2dnUVZ_jadnZ2d@nventure.com...
    > "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
    > news:eek:JednZxVPZGDYNnWnZ2dnUVZ_h6dnZ2d@posted.grandecom...
    >> Hi, Alex.
    >>
    >>> I guess I will just leave it alone if I have to do that to get at it.

    >>
    >> You must have missed this line:
    >>
    >>>> My favorite way is simply to click Start, type diskmgmt.msc, and press
    >>>> Enter.

    >>
    >> It's well worth the investment of time! You will reap dividends, not
    >> just for today or this week, but for as long as you keep using
    >> computers - which might be for the rest of your life.
    >>
    >> RC
    >>

    >
    > Yes I did miss that. I was reading the other steps and all I could think
    > of was all the ways I could screw something up trying. <G>
    > I just opened it from the start menu, plugged in one of the ED's.
    > Has a whole page of "stuff" nothing I have any clue what to do with
    > though. I have no idea what most of the stuff it's showing even means. I
    > know it's FAT32 and understand the percentage used and free, but there is
    > a lot of other stuff there I have no idea what it means. I guess if it is
    > ever screwed up, and I can remember this, I know how to get to the page
    > anyway.
    > I went back to your previous post and did manage to find what you were
    > talking about, and it is set for quick removal, not better performance. I
    > had never heard of or seen this before.
    > Is there any real up side to the better performance? Does that mean it
    > works faster?
     
  10. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Flightless Bird

    "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
    news:i6adnSrppvvHk9jWnZ2dnUVZ_uednZ2d@posted.grandecom...
    > Hi, Alex.
    >
    > As I said, Microsoft originally buried DM so deeply that even many experts
    > never found it. More users know about it now, but still too few. And,
    > yes, like any powerful tool, it can do harm as well as good if not used
    > carefully. That's why it won't run without specific Administrator
    > approval. But if you run it often, as I do, you might want to create a
    > shortcut and, in the shortcut's Properties, click Advanced and Run as
    > administrator, so that you don't have to see the prompt each time. I
    > don't really recommend this because it probably is best to be reminded
    > each time.
    >
    >> Is there any real up side to the better performance? Does that mean it
    >> works faster?

    >
    > As usual, "it depends". You probably are familiar with the workings of a
    > cache or buffer system. As an example, when trying to pump 20 gallons of
    > water through a pipe that can only move 1 gallon per minute, the pump is
    > going to be busy for 20 minutes, even if the pipe could pump out 10
    > gallons per minute. But if you put a 20-gallon holding tank between the
    > pump and the small pipe, the pump could fill that tank in 2 minutes and
    > then go on to a different job while the small pipe slowly empties the
    > holding tank.
    >
    > Your computer's hard drive cache is like the holding tank. Your fast CPU
    > can send data many times faster than your thumb drive - or even your hard
    > drive - can write it to the disk. With caching turned on, the CPU can
    > send the data and then turn its attention to other matters while the drive
    > writes the data - quickly, but not nearly as quickly as the CPU sent it.
    > If you unplug the device before the cache is fully written, you will lose
    > some of the data.
    >
    > So, if you do a lot of large writes to the disk (when backing up a big
    > partition, for example), you could lose a lot of unwritten data by
    > "pulling the plug" too soon. But if everything you send to the device is
    > in short bursts, such as when you are manually updating a database,
    > there's not much danger of loss - and not much gain from using the cache,
    > anyhow. The write cache is not very big, so it typically gets emptied in
    > a second - or less. (No, I don't really know how big it is.)
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA



    [Lazarus Long]
    > San Marcos, TX
    > rc@grandecom.net
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64
    >
    >


    Thanks. I had seen the terms you just used, but no, I really did not know
    what it all meant. Now I understand it a lot better. The thumb drives are
    just used to move very small stuff, like a report. The EHD, are loaded with
    all the important stuff I don't want to lose, so the first time I use one
    there is 5 or even 10 Gigs of stuff moving in. It does take a while but I
    have always just let it go or done other stuff while it ran, until it tells
    me everything has been copied. Now days it's just a matter of adding new
    stuff, so I will just leave things as they are. It was interesting though, I
    now know what a few more terms mean. Thanks!!!
    --
    "Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites.
    Moderation is for monks."

    [Lazarus Long]
     
  11. Char Jackson

    Char Jackson Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 6 Jan 2010 10:51:25 -0600, "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net>
    wrote:

    >Disk Management is one of my favorite utilities. It can do so much - but
    >few users have discovered it. :>(


    RC, how would you compare Disk Management in 7 to DM in XP? I'm still
    running XP on my own PC and about the only task I use DM for is to
    assign or change drive letters. For everything else disk-related I use
    Acronis Disk Director, which is far more capable than XP's DM. Have
    they souped up DM for 7?
     
  12. Kadaitcha Man

    Kadaitcha Man Flightless Bird

    "Char Jackson", thou porn-ogling fever blister. Thy intellect is not
    replenished, thou art only an animal, only sensible in the duller parts.
    Ye purred:

    > RC, how would you compare Disk Management in 7 to DM in XP? I'm still
    > running XP on my own PC and about the only task I use DM for is to
    > assign or change drive letters. For everything else disk-related I use
    > Acronis Disk Director, which is far more capable than XP's DM. Have they
    > souped up DM for 7?


    http://tinyurl.com/ybrga4h

    Dumbfuck cunt.
     
  13. R. C. White

    R. C. White Flightless Bird

    Hi, Char.

    Each version of Windows since Win2K has had an improved, more-capable
    version of Disk Management. I don't clearly recall just when each
    improvement appeared, but it keeps getting better. At first, as you said,
    it took over drive letter assignments, plus the functions previously done by
    FDISK and Format.exe, and not much else.

    Vista introduced one change that I don't much care for: Automatic creation
    of the extended partition. My practice since I began dual-booting with
    Win95/NT4 has been to create a single primary partition on each HDD and
    include the rest of that disk in an extended partition, which I divide into
    multiple logical drives.

    Caution: Major digression in the next 3 paragraphs:
    That arrangement came to me out of necessity at first. My 9 GB HDD was huge
    for its day in about 1998. Win95/98 could not read NTFS and WinNT4 could
    not read FAT32, so I had to limit each partition to the 2 GB that FAT(16)
    could handle, because both Windows versions could read that. So I chose to
    create the extended partition and make four 2 GB logical drives. That left
    me with about 800 MB of my 9 GB, so that's the size I made a single primary
    partition at the front of the disk, formatted FAT, and marked Active
    (bootable). This became my System Partition, Drive C:. I ran Win95 Setup
    to install Win95 on the first logical drive (D:), but it put its boot sector
    and startup files (IO.sys, MSDOS.sys, Config.sys and Autoexec.bat) onto
    Drive C: and the rest of Win95 into D:/Windows. Then I ran WinNT4 and it
    rewrote the boot sector and added NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini to C:/
    while installing the bulk of WinNT4 into E:/WinNT. So, C: was the System
    Partition, D: was the boot volume for Win95 and E: was the boot volume for
    WinNT4.

    In the decade since, I've installed/deleted/reinstalled many versions of
    Windows, but my basic disk organization has remained the same: one small
    primary partition to serve as the System Partition, and multiple logical
    drives to server as boot volumes for multiple Windows installations - and
    for apps and data volumes.

    Win2K and WinXP versions of Disk Management let me create the extended
    partition directly. Starting in Vista, though, Disk Management
    automatically creates the first 3 partitions as primary partitions. When
    asked to create a 4th partition, it first creates an extended partition and
    then creates a logical drive there. To get the single primary partition
    that I want, I have to use the more-powerful DiskPart.exe shell - and its
    command line interface.


    Other changes in DM include showing multiple labels in the Status column.
    In Win2K/XP, there could be only a single Status label, so if Drive C:
    served as both System and Boot volume, only the System label was shown. In
    Vista/Win7, we might see a half-dozen labels in the Status column: Healthy,
    System, Active, Primary Partition (or Logical Drive), Boot, Page File, Crash
    Dump.

    DM can now Shrink and Extend a volume - but it can't move one; you'll still
    need a third-party tool for that. It still irks me that DM can't remember
    its display settings from one session to the next. I have to Maximize the
    window and widen the Status column every time it runs. DM will also handle
    dynamic disks and GPT disks, but I've not learned much about those.

    Before Disk Management, I used Partition Manager, but I've hardly touched it
    since DM arrived in Win2K, and not at all since WinXP. And I've never used
    anything from Acronis, but I've heard many good reports about their
    products.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@grandecom.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64

    "Char Jackson" <none@none.invalid> wrote in message
    news:i862l5593vl948ud40b7eo4a99d6h5u6ut@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 6 Jan 2010 10:51:25 -0600, "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Disk Management is one of my favorite utilities. It can do so much - but
    >>few users have discovered it. :>(

    >
    > RC, how would you compare Disk Management in 7 to DM in XP? I'm still
    > running XP on my own PC and about the only task I use DM for is to
    > assign or change drive letters. For everything else disk-related I use
    > Acronis Disk Director, which is far more capable than XP's DM. Have
    > they souped up DM for 7?
     
  14. Char Jackson

    Char Jackson Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 15 Jan 2010 22:34:18 -0600, "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net>
    wrote:

    >Vista introduced one change that I don't much care for: Automatic creation
    >of the extended partition. My practice since I began dual-booting with
    >Win95/NT4 has been to create a single primary partition on each HDD and
    >include the rest of that disk in an extended partition, which I divide into
    >multiple logical drives.


    Yes, automatic-anything would be annoying. I stopped using logical
    partitions many years ago when I migrated from 98SE to Win2k. Since
    then I use a single primary partition per physical drive.

    Thanks for the other info on Disk Management over the years. Although
    it has apparently gained some functionality over time, it's still
    seriously limited when compared to 3rd party tools, so I guess it's
    still nothing more than a way to assign/change drive letters to me.
    I'll stick with Acronis Disk Director.
     
  15. Lord Vetinari

    Lord Vetinari Flightless Bird

    "Kadaitcha Man" <anon@no.email> wrote in message
    news:p611qp$1bj$0@thawed-out-good-time-girl.co.iceland...
    [snip]
    > Dumbfuck cunt.


    Indeed, you are. Now, FOAD, please.
     

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