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Running Linux can cause Brain Injury

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by Bill Yanaire, ESQ, May 24, 2010.

  1. Bill Yanaire, ESQ

    Bill Yanaire, ESQ Flightless Bird

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), also called acquired brain injury or simply
    head injury, occurs when a sudden trauma causes damage to the brain. TBI can
    result when the user installs a LINUX based Operating System on his or her
    computer. Objects soon appear to pierce the skull and brain tissue.
    Symptoms of a TBI can be mild, moderate, or severe, depending on the extent
    of the damage to the brain. A person with a mild TBI may remain conscious
    or may experience a loss of consciousness for a few seconds or minutes.
    Other symptoms of mild TBI include using Open Source software like
    OpenOffice, GIMP,. Galeon, Mozilla, Bluefish, VI, or a host of other
    applications.

    Using versions of LINUX causes problems with memory, concentration,
    attention, or thinking. A person with a moderate or severe TBI may show
    these same symptoms, but may also have a headache that gets worse or does
    not go away, repeated vomiting or nausea, convulsions or seizures, an
    inability to awaken from sleep, dilation of one or both pupils of the eyes,
    slurred speech, weakness or numbness in the extremities, loss of
    coordination, and increased confusion, restlessness, or agitation.

    Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right away.
    Installing a Windows based solution should help stabilize an individual and
    focus on preventing further injury.
     
  2. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:

    > Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    > away


    Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much better.

    --
    Alias
     
  3. Frank

    Frank Flightless Bird

    On 5/24/2010 4:41 PM, Alias wrote:
    > On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >
    >> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >> away

    >
    > Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much better.
    >

    You got Hepatitis C from being a sheep-fucker, right?
    Figures!
     
  4. Bill Yanaire, ESQ

    Bill Yanaire, ESQ Flightless Bird

    "Alias" <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote in message
    news:htf2r7$r5h$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >
    >> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >> away

    >
    > Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much better.
    >
    > --
    > Alias


    My PC doesn't get the BSOD. Oops.
     
  5. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >
    >
    > "Alias" <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote in message
    > news:htf2r7$r5h$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >> On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>
    >>> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >>> away

    >>
    >> Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much better.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Alias

    >
    > My PC doesn't get the BSOD. Oops.
    >
    >


    You have to use the machine for more than posting lies in Usenet like
    you do.

    --
    Alias
     
  6. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    > Traumatic brain injury (TBI), also called acquired brain injury or simply
    > head injury, occurs when a sudden trauma causes damage to the brain. TBI
    > can
    > result when the user installs a LINUX based Operating System on his or her
    > computer. Objects soon appear to pierce the skull and brain tissue.
    > Symptoms of a TBI can be mild, moderate, or severe, depending on the extent
    > of the damage to the brain. A person with a mild TBI may remain conscious
    > or may experience a loss of consciousness for a few seconds or minutes.
    > Other symptoms of mild TBI include using Open Source software like
    > OpenOffice, GIMP,. Galeon, Mozilla, Bluefish, VI, or a host of other
    > applications.
    >
    > Using versions of LINUX causes problems with memory, concentration,
    > attention, or thinking. A person with a moderate or severe TBI may show
    > these same symptoms, but may also have a headache that gets worse or does
    > not go away, repeated vomiting or nausea, convulsions or seizures, an
    > inability to awaken from sleep, dilation of one or both pupils of the eyes,
    > slurred speech, weakness or numbness in the extremities, loss of
    > coordination, and increased confusion, restlessness, or agitation.
    >
    > Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    > away.
    > Installing a Windows based solution should help stabilize an individual and
    > focus on preventing further injury.
    >
    >
    >
    >


    The amazing and pathetic thing is that the Nymshifter actually believes
    this erroneous drivel.

    --
    Alias
     
  7. Frank

    Frank Flightless Bird

    On 5/25/2010 7:47 AM, Alias wrote:
    > Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> "Alias" <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote in message
    >> news:htf2r7$r5h$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>> On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >>>> away
    >>>
    >>> Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much
    >>> better.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Alias

    >>
    >> My PC doesn't get the BSOD. Oops.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > You have to use the machine for more than posting lies in Usenet like
    > you do.
    >

    You don't have nor use W 7. Best you just STFU, asshole.
     
  8. Frank

    Frank Flightless Bird

    On 5/25/2010 7:49 AM, Alias wrote:
    > Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >> Traumatic brain injury (TBI), also called acquired brain injury or simply
    >> head injury, occurs when a sudden trauma causes damage to the brain. TBI
    >> can
    >> result when the user installs a LINUX based Operating System on his or
    >> her
    >> computer. Objects soon appear to pierce the skull and brain tissue.
    >> Symptoms of a TBI can be mild, moderate, or severe, depending on the
    >> extent
    >> of the damage to the brain. A person with a mild TBI may remain conscious
    >> or may experience a loss of consciousness for a few seconds or minutes.
    >> Other symptoms of mild TBI include using Open Source software like
    >> OpenOffice, GIMP,. Galeon, Mozilla, Bluefish, VI, or a host of other
    >> applications.
    >>
    >> Using versions of LINUX causes problems with memory, concentration,
    >> attention, or thinking. A person with a moderate or severe TBI may show
    >> these same symptoms, but may also have a headache that gets worse or does
    >> not go away, repeated vomiting or nausea, convulsions or seizures, an
    >> inability to awaken from sleep, dilation of one or both pupils of the
    >> eyes,
    >> slurred speech, weakness or numbness in the extremities, loss of
    >> coordination, and increased confusion, restlessness, or agitation.
    >>
    >> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >> away.
    >> Installing a Windows based solution should help stabilize an
    >> individual and
    >> focus on preventing further injury.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > The amazing and pathetic thing is that the Nymshifter actually believes
    > this erroneous drivel.
    >

    Not really. The amazing thing is you beleive your drivel.
    Asshole!
     
  9. Death

    Death Flightless Bird

    "Alias" <aka@maskedandanymous.org.invalido> wrote in message
    news:htgnth$ctu$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>


    SNIP

    >>
    >> My PC doesn't get the BSOD. Oops.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > You have to use the machine for more than posting lies in Usenet like you
    > do.
    >


    That really isn't true anymore, Linux advocate.
    I think most linux users tend to recall Windows 95 or something.
    I haven't had a BSOD since XPsp1.

    Windows XP sp2/3, Vista and 7 have been amazingly stable.

    I think that's one reason I tinker with Linux...Windows pretty much runs
    itself...no tweaking is really required anymore.

    You linux advocates really need to get something made in the past 10 years.

    --
    Vita brevis breviter in brevi finietur,
    Mors venit velociter quae neminem veretur.
     
  10. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    On 05/25/2010 11:05 PM, Death wrote:
    >
    > "Alias" <aka@maskedandanymous.org.invalido> wrote in message
    > news:htgnth$ctu$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >> Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>>

    >
    > SNIP
    >
    >>>
    >>> My PC doesn't get the BSOD. Oops.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> You have to use the machine for more than posting lies in Usenet like
    >> you do.
    >>

    >
    > That really isn't true anymore, Linux advocate.


    Um, yes it is. Try doing a search on BSOD Windows 7. If you do XP, you
    will get millions of hits.


    > I think most linux users tend to recall Windows 95 or something.
    > I haven't had a BSOD since XPsp1.


    And you think this is standard? LOL!

    >
    > Windows XP sp2/3, Vista and 7 have been amazingly stable.


    Until some hardware goes south.

    >
    > I think that's one reason I tinker with Linux...Windows pretty much runs
    > itself...no tweaking is really required anymore.


    Define tweaking.

    >
    > You linux advocates really need to get something made in the past 10 years.
    >


    I can see you haven't installed the latest Ubuntu. It's a big change.

    --
    Alias
     
  11. Muad'Dib

    Muad'Dib Flightless Bird

    On 05/24/2010 05:41 PM, Alias wrote:
    > On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >
    >> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >> away

    >
    > Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much better.
    >


    Don't forget the KSOD! That one is pretty much unrecoverable, and
    according to MS's only fix it was recommended to do a complete "clean
    install" of the OS. I have personally been a victim of that one, and yup
    after MUCH research and trying every fix listed finally had to
    reinstall. What a pain.

    G'day
     
  12. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    On 05/26/2010 09:40 PM, Muad'Dib wrote:
    > On 05/24/2010 05:41 PM, Alias wrote:
    >> On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>
    >>> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >>> away

    >>
    >> Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much better.
    >>

    >
    > Don't forget the KSOD! That one is pretty much unrecoverable, and
    > according to MS's only fix it was recommended to do a complete "clean
    > install" of the OS. I have personally been a victim of that one, and yup
    > after MUCH research and trying every fix listed finally had to
    > reinstall. What a pain.
    >
    > G'day


    Course, if you have Home backed up, a reinstall of Ubuntu takes less
    time than it would take to have a cup of coffee.

    --
    Alias
     
  13. John B. Slocomb

    John B. Slocomb Flightless Bird

    On Thu, 27 May 2010 01:43:01 +0200, Alias
    <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote:

    >On 05/26/2010 09:40 PM, Muad'Dib wrote:
    >> On 05/24/2010 05:41 PM, Alias wrote:
    >>> On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >>>> away
    >>>
    >>> Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much better.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Don't forget the KSOD! That one is pretty much unrecoverable, and
    >> according to MS's only fix it was recommended to do a complete "clean
    >> install" of the OS. I have personally been a victim of that one, and yup
    >> after MUCH research and trying every fix listed finally had to
    >> reinstall. What a pain.
    >>
    >> G'day

    >
    >Course, if you have Home backed up, a reinstall of Ubuntu takes less
    >time than it would take to have a cup of coffee.



    And (he implies) Linux will never, never have a problem. One wonders
    why the following is a part of the system:

    Kernel Panic
    In Linux, a "panic" is an unrecoverable system error detected by the
    kernel as opposed to similar errors detected by user space code. It is
    possible for kernel code to indicate such a condition by calling the
    panic function located in the header file sys/system.h.

    Strange that they built such an unneeded function into this bullet
    proof operating system....

    Or perhaps Alias, once again, is demonstrating his lack of knowledge.

    John B. Slocomb
    (johnbslocombatgmaildotcom)
     
  14. Muad'Dib

    Muad'Dib Flightless Bird

    On 05/26/2010 05:43 PM, Alias wrote:
    > On 05/26/2010 09:40 PM, Muad'Dib wrote:
    >> On 05/24/2010 05:41 PM, Alias wrote:
    >>> On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >>>> away
    >>>
    >>> Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much
    >>> better.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Don't forget the KSOD! That one is pretty much unrecoverable, and
    >> according to MS's only fix it was recommended to do a complete "clean
    >> install" of the OS. I have personally been a victim of that one, and yup
    >> after MUCH research and trying every fix listed finally had to
    >> reinstall. What a pain.
    >>
    >> G'day

    >
    > Course, if you have Home backed up, a reinstall of Ubuntu takes less
    > time than it would take to have a cup of coffee.
    >


    Yes, have done that too. Works great and all your settings are not lost.
    Did some OS upgrades that way and it works like a charm!

    G'day
     
  15. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    On 05/27/2010 07:30 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
    > On Thu, 27 May 2010 01:43:01 +0200, Alias
    > <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote:
    >
    >> On 05/26/2010 09:40 PM, Muad'Dib wrote:
    >>> On 05/24/2010 05:41 PM, Alias wrote:
    >>>> On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >>>>> away
    >>>>
    >>>> Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much better.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Don't forget the KSOD! That one is pretty much unrecoverable, and
    >>> according to MS's only fix it was recommended to do a complete "clean
    >>> install" of the OS. I have personally been a victim of that one, and yup
    >>> after MUCH research and trying every fix listed finally had to
    >>> reinstall. What a pain.
    >>>
    >>> G'day

    >>
    >> Course, if you have Home backed up, a reinstall of Ubuntu takes less
    >> time than it would take to have a cup of coffee.

    >
    >
    > And (he implies) Linux will never, never have a problem.


    Liar.

    > One wonders
    > why the following is a part of the system:
    >
    > Kernel Panic
    > In Linux, a "panic" is an unrecoverable system error detected by the
    > kernel as opposed to similar errors detected by user space code. It is
    > possible for kernel code to indicate such a condition by calling the
    > panic function located in the header file sys/system.h.
    >
    > Strange that they built such an unneeded function into this bullet
    > proof operating system....
    >
    > Or perhaps Alias, once again, is demonstrating his lack of knowledge.
    >
    > John B. Slocomb
    > (johnbslocombatgmaildotcom)


    You're lying and there's no perhaps about it.


    --
    Alias
     
  16. John B. Slocomb

    John B. Slocomb Flightless Bird

    On Thu, 27 May 2010 12:08:06 +0200, Alias
    <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote:

    >On 05/27/2010 07:30 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
    >> On Thu, 27 May 2010 01:43:01 +0200, Alias
    >> <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 05/26/2010 09:40 PM, Muad'Dib wrote:
    >>>> On 05/24/2010 05:41 PM, Alias wrote:
    >>>>> On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >>>>>> away
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much better.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Don't forget the KSOD! That one is pretty much unrecoverable, and
    >>>> according to MS's only fix it was recommended to do a complete "clean
    >>>> install" of the OS. I have personally been a victim of that one, and yup
    >>>> after MUCH research and trying every fix listed finally had to
    >>>> reinstall. What a pain.
    >>>>
    >>>> G'day
    >>>
    >>> Course, if you have Home backed up, a reinstall of Ubuntu takes less
    >>> time than it would take to have a cup of coffee.

    >>
    >>
    >> And (he implies) Linux will never, never have a problem.

    >
    >Liar.
    >
    >> One wonders
    >> why the following is a part of the system:
    >>
    >> Kernel Panic
    >> In Linux, a "panic" is an unrecoverable system error detected by the
    >> kernel as opposed to similar errors detected by user space code. It is
    >> possible for kernel code to indicate such a condition by calling the
    >> panic function located in the header file sys/system.h.
    >>
    >> Strange that they built such an unneeded function into this bullet
    >> proof operating system....
    >>
    >> Or perhaps Alias, once again, is demonstrating his lack of knowledge.
    >>
    >> John B. Slocomb
    >> (johnbslocombatgmaildotcom)

    >
    >You're lying and there's no perhaps about it.


    So are you going to try and tell me that Linux systems do not have the
    kernel panic warnings built into them? Or are you telling me that I'm
    lying about it being there? Or is this an end run to try and deflect
    the fact that you don't know what you are talking about?

    John B. Slocomb
    (johnbslocombatgmaildotcom)
     
  17. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    John B. Slocomb wrote:
    > On Thu, 27 May 2010 12:08:06 +0200, Alias
    > <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote:
    >
    >> On 05/27/2010 07:30 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
    >>> On Thu, 27 May 2010 01:43:01 +0200, Alias
    >>> <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 05/26/2010 09:40 PM, Muad'Dib wrote:
    >>>>> On 05/24/2010 05:41 PM, Alias wrote:
    >>>>>> On 05/24/2010 11:31 PM, Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Anyone with signs of TBI should remove LINUX from their machines right
    >>>>>>> away
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Because the Nymshifting low life thinks you'll like the BSOD much better.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Don't forget the KSOD! That one is pretty much unrecoverable, and
    >>>>> according to MS's only fix it was recommended to do a complete "clean
    >>>>> install" of the OS. I have personally been a victim of that one, and yup
    >>>>> after MUCH research and trying every fix listed finally had to
    >>>>> reinstall. What a pain.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> G'day
    >>>>
    >>>> Course, if you have Home backed up, a reinstall of Ubuntu takes less
    >>>> time than it would take to have a cup of coffee.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> And (he implies) Linux will never, never have a problem.

    >>
    >> Liar.
    >>
    >>> One wonders
    >>> why the following is a part of the system:
    >>>
    >>> Kernel Panic
    >>> In Linux, a "panic" is an unrecoverable system error detected by the
    >>> kernel as opposed to similar errors detected by user space code. It is
    >>> possible for kernel code to indicate such a condition by calling the
    >>> panic function located in the header file sys/system.h.
    >>>
    >>> Strange that they built such an unneeded function into this bullet
    >>> proof operating system....
    >>>
    >>> Or perhaps Alias, once again, is demonstrating his lack of knowledge.
    >>>
    >>> John B. Slocomb
    >>> (johnbslocombatgmaildotcom)

    >>
    >> You're lying and there's no perhaps about it.

    >
    > So are you going to try and tell me that Linux systems do not have the
    > kernel panic warnings built into them?


    No.

    > Or are you telling me that I'm
    > lying about it being there?


    No.

    > Or is this an end run to try and deflect
    > the fact that you don't know what you are talking about?
    >
    > John B. Slocomb
    > (johnbslocombatgmaildotcom)


    No.

    --
    Alias
     
  18. Death

    Death Flightless Bird

    "Alias" <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote in message
    news:htiu7v$g1f$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > On 05/25/2010 11:05 PM, Death wrote:
    >>
    >> "Alias" <aka@maskedandanymous.org.invalido> wrote in message
    >> news:htgnth$ctu$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>> Bill Yanaire, ESQ wrote:
    >>>>

    >>
    >> SNIP
    >>
    >>>>
    >>>> My PC doesn't get the BSOD. Oops.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> You have to use the machine for more than posting lies in Usenet like
    >>> you do.
    >>>

    >>
    >> That really isn't true anymore, Linux advocate.

    >
    > Um, yes it is. Try doing a search on BSOD Windows 7. If you do XP, you
    > will get millions of hits.
    >


    If I search ubuntu crash, I get over 2 million hits.
    So what?

    >
    >> I think most linux users tend to recall Windows 95 or something.
    >> I haven't had a BSOD since XPsp1.

    >
    > And you think this is standard? LOL!
    >


    Yes.
    Most people run Windows without complaint.

    >>
    >> Windows XP sp2/3, Vista and 7 have been amazingly stable.

    >
    > Until some hardware goes south.
    >


    No duh.
    Functioning hardware is required.

    >>
    >> I think that's one reason I tinker with Linux...Windows pretty much runs
    >> itself...no tweaking is really required anymore.

    >
    > Define tweaking.
    >


    Fiddling.


    >>
    >> You linux advocates really need to get something made in the past 10
    >> years.
    >>

    >
    > I can see you haven't installed the latest Ubuntu. It's a big change.
    >


    Why in tarnation would I do that?
    If you're trying to create another ubuntard...keep walking.

    --
    Vita brevis breviter in brevi finietur,
    Mors venit velociter quae neminem veretur.
     

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