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"Repair" install over existing XP

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by _DD, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. _DD

    _DD Flightless Bird

    I've got a couple XP partitions that seem flakey, perhaps just due to
    hit-or-miss Windows updates (some didn't go well--I noticed problems
    immediately after). I do have newer install CDs with SP3 merged, but
    I don't want to reinstall all apps if that can be avoided.

    Is there an easy way to do a "repair" installation from the XP SP3
    CDs, over top of the existing XP installs? Goal being to keep all the
    existing apps.

    Secondary to this, I'd probably need to wipe the older keys, as the
    newer CDs have different keys. A regular repair seems to want the
    original install CD, which, in this case, would defeat the purpose.
     
  2. Shenan Stanley

    Shenan Stanley Flightless Bird

    _DD wrote:
    > I've got a couple XP partitions that seem flakey, perhaps just due
    > to hit-or-miss Windows updates (some didn't go well--I noticed
    > problems immediately after). I do have newer install CDs with SP3
    > merged, but I don't want to reinstall all apps if that can be
    > avoided.
    >
    > Is there an easy way to do a "repair" installation from the XP SP3
    > CDs, over top of the existing XP installs? Goal being to keep all
    > the existing apps.
    >
    > Secondary to this, I'd probably need to wipe the older keys, as the
    > newer CDs have different keys. A regular repair seems to want the
    > original install CD, which, in this case, would defeat the purpose.


    How to Perform a Windows XP Repair Install
    http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/XPrepairinstall.htm

    How to perform an in-place upgrade (reinstallation) of Windows XP
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315341

    A "repair" installation of Windows XP (in-place upgrade) normally does not
    require one to re-install any software, etc. It can be used to change the
    product key of a Windows XP installation as well (although Microsoft does
    provide a tool that can do that too.) In any case - a specific product key
    is not assigned to a specific Windows XP CD - the CD itself (unless modified
    for an unattended or partially unattended installation) has no record of the
    specific key - just the *type* of key one can use (for what edition - home,
    professional, media center, tablet pc, etc... AND the type of license - OEM,
    retail, upgrade, volume, etc...)

    Hope that helps.

    --
    Shenan Stanley
    MS-MVP
    --
    How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
     
  3. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    > _DD wrote:
    >> I've got a couple XP partitions that seem flakey, perhaps just due
    >> to hit-or-miss Windows updates (some didn't go well--I noticed
    >> problems immediately after). I do have newer install CDs with SP3
    >> merged, but I don't want to reinstall all apps if that can be
    >> avoided.
    >>
    >> Is there an easy way to do a "repair" installation from the XP SP3
    >> CDs, over top of the existing XP installs? Goal being to keep all
    >> the existing apps.
    >>
    >> Secondary to this, I'd probably need to wipe the older keys, as the
    >> newer CDs have different keys. A regular repair seems to want the
    >> original install CD, which, in this case, would defeat the purpose.



    "Shenan Stanley" <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:-OVuJo9ElKHA.6096@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > How to Perform a Windows XP Repair Install
    > http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/XPrepairinstall.htm
    >
    > How to perform an in-place upgrade (reinstallation) of Windows XP
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315341
    >
    > A "repair" installation of Windows XP (in-place upgrade) normally does not
    > require one to re-install any software, etc. It can be used to change the
    > product key of a Windows XP installation as well (although Microsoft does
    > provide a tool that can do that too.) In any case - a specific product
    > key is not assigned to a specific Windows XP CD - the CD itself (unless
    > modified for an unattended or partially unattended installation) has no
    > record of the specific key - just the *type* of key one can use (for what
    > edition - home, professional, media center, tablet pc, etc... AND the type
    > of license - OEM, retail, upgrade, volume, etc...)
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    >
    > --
    > Shenan Stanley
    > MS-MVP
    > --
    > How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    > http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html



    DD:
    Undertaking a Repair install of the OS is a relatively straightforward
    process. It would be roughly akin to making a fresh install of the OS, but
    in nearly every case your existing programs & user-created data would be
    retained. Notice I said "nearly". While it would be a rather rare situation
    where data would be lost or corrupted as a result of the Repair install, and
    as unlikely as it may be, it *could* happen.

    So if there are any programs and/or other data on your present drive that
    are absolutely crucial to you and you could not tolerate their loss, then I
    would strongly suggest that before undertaking this Repair install operation
    that you first either make a "clone" of your existing HDD (using a
    disk-cloning or disk-imaging program) or, if that's not practical, prior to
    undertaking the Repair install, pull off whatever data you want onto some
    removable media, e.g., flash drive, CD, another external HDD, etc.

    Again, it's a relatively rare event that a loss or corruption of data will
    occur even when the Repair install is unsuccessful, but it *can* happen. So
    you should be aware of this.

    Here are some more step-by-step instructions re the Repair install that can
    be found at Microsoft's site...
    The repair and reinstallation process might take more than an hour.
    Eventually, Setup prompts you to answer questions just as if you were
    installing Windows XP for the first time. For detailed instructions, read
    "Install Windows XP" at...
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/winxp/install.mspx"

    <quote>
    Before performing a repair installation of Windows XP, you should have both
    your Windows XP CD and your product key available.

    To perform a repair installation of Windows XP

    1. Insert your Windows XP CD into your computer.

    2. Restart your computer. If prompted, press a key to start from the CD-ROM.

    3. When the Welcome to Setup page appears, press ENTER on your keyboard.

    4. On the Windows XP Licensing Agreement page, read the licensing agreement.
    Press the PAGE DOWN key to scroll to the bottom of the agreement. Then,
    press F8.

    5. When prompted, press R to have Windows XP attempt to repair Windows by
    reinstalling important Windows components.
    </quote>

    Also, here are some other websites that contain detailed step-by-step
    instructions for undertaking a Repair install in case you're interested.
    It's a relatively simple & straightforward process and usually not terribly
    time-consuming. As I've indicated, it's roughly similar to making a fresh
    install of the XP OS.
    http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/repair_xp.htm
    http://www.geekstogo.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=138
    http://www.windowsreinstall.com/winxppro/installxpcdrepair/indexfullpage.htm
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;315341

    As you will note from the various instructions re the Repair install, and as
    Shenan pointed out, you can enter the appropriate Product ID key during the
    process.

    Assuming the Repair install is successful, you should use your A-V program
    to immediately check out your PC for any virus infestation. Also, you will
    need to download/install *all* the MS critical updates since SP3 and
    possibly some updated programs from MS in which you're interested.

    Just one thing more...

    It's just possible that other factors may be involved here that are causing
    the problem(s) you relate when you state "I've got a couple XP partitions
    that seem flakey..." and that a Repair install of the OS won't "cure". But
    no doubt you're aware of that, yes?
    Anna
     
  4. pip22

    pip22 Flightless Bird

    You don't need the original CD to perform a repair-install, but the CD
    must contain exactly the same edition of Windows (and same service-pack
    level) as the installation you want to repair. Also, a repair-install
    does not ask for the CD-key, and the existing (installed) key remains
    the same when repair is completed.

    If you want to avoid even more "flakey installs" don't look for
    short-cuts. A clean install on to an empty partition is the best way to
    go (and in any case many XP discs with integrated SP3 won't let you do
    it any other way, they insist on the target partition being empty).

    It will take up more of your time than a repair job but you should be
    rewarded with a more stable OS.
     
  5. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird


    > _DD wrote:
    >> I've got a couple XP partitions that seem flakey, perhaps just due
    >> to hit-or-miss Windows updates (some didn't go well--I noticed
    >> problems immediately after). I do have newer install CDs with SP3
    >> merged, but I don't want to reinstall all apps if that can be
    >> avoided.
    >>
    >> Is there an easy way to do a "repair" installation from the XP SP3
    >> CDs, over top of the existing XP installs? Goal being to keep all
    >> the existing apps.
    >>
    >> Secondary to this, I'd probably need to wipe the older keys, as the
    >> newer CDs have different keys. A regular repair seems to want the
    >> original install CD, which, in this case, would defeat the purpose.



    "pip22" <pip22.44qzaq@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
    news:pip22.44qzaq@no.email.invalid...

    > You don't need the original CD to perform a repair-install, but the CD
    > must contain exactly the same edition of Windows (and same service-pack
    > level) as the installation you want to repair. Also, a repair-install
    > does not ask for the CD-key, and the existing (installed) key remains
    > the same when repair is completed.

    (SNIP)

    pip22 (& DD)...
    While it is true one needs to use the same edition (e.g., Home or Pro, etc.)
    as the XP OS one is attempting to Repair, it's not mandatory that the XP OS
    installation CD contain the same Service Pack level. For example, as long as
    a user will be booting to the XP OS installation CD that contains SP2 and
    the installed OS he or she is trying to Repair contains SP3, the Repair
    install could be undertaken with that CD. Assuming the Repair install is
    successful the user could then install SP3 onto the system.

    Having said that...

    All things considered, for obvious reasons, it would generally be best (in
    the above example) to use a "slipstreamed" XP OS installation CD that
    contained SP3.
    Anna
     
  6. _DD

    _DD Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 06:53:17 -0600, "Shenan Stanley"
    <newshelper@gmail.com> wrote:

    >_DD wrote:
    >> I've got a couple XP partitions that seem flakey, perhaps just due
    >> to hit-or-miss Windows updates (some didn't go well--I noticed
    >> problems immediately after). I do have newer install CDs with SP3
    >> merged, but I don't want to reinstall all apps if that can be
    >> avoided.
    >>
    >> Is there an easy way to do a "repair" installation from the XP SP3
    >> CDs, over top of the existing XP installs? Goal being to keep all
    >> the existing apps.
    >>
    >> Secondary to this, I'd probably need to wipe the older keys, as the
    >> newer CDs have different keys. A regular repair seems to want the
    >> original install CD, which, in this case, would defeat the purpose.

    >
    > How to Perform a Windows XP Repair Install
    > http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/XPrepairinstall.htm
    >
    > How to perform an in-place upgrade (reinstallation) of Windows XP
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315341
    >
    >A "repair" installation of Windows XP (in-place upgrade) normally does not
    >require one to re-install any software, etc. It can be used to change the
    >product key of a Windows XP installation as well (although Microsoft does
    >provide a tool that can do that too.) In any case - a specific product key
    >is not assigned to a specific Windows XP CD - the CD itself (unless modified
    >for an unattended or partially unattended installation) has no record of the
    >specific key - just the *type* of key one can use (for what edition - home,
    >professional, media center, tablet pc, etc... AND the type of license - OEM,
    >retail, upgrade, volume, etc...)
    >
    >Hope that helps.
    >
    >--
    >Shenan Stanley
    > MS-MVP


    Thanks to all for the replies. It went surprisingly smoothly,
    considering my previous attempts to do something similar. The
    question was based on some upgrade/repair failures that halted with
    messages about the install CDs having different versions or serials
    (don't remember...it's been a while).

    Latest was with an MSDN version with SP3 pre-merged. Maybe that had
    something to do with it.

    Previous OS problems may have been caused by services or 'internal'
    files that had been stopped or corrupted. The repair evidently fixed
    those problems. Thanks again.
     
  7. _DD

    _DD Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 18:41:26 -0500, "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote:

    >
    >> _DD wrote:
    >>> I've got a couple XP partitions that seem flakey, perhaps just due
    >>> to hit-or-miss Windows updates (some didn't go well--I noticed
    >>> problems immediately after). I do have newer install CDs with SP3
    >>> merged, but I don't want to reinstall all apps if that can be
    >>> avoided.
    >>>
    >>> Is there an easy way to do a "repair" installation from the XP SP3
    >>> CDs, over top of the existing XP installs? Goal being to keep all
    >>> the existing apps.
    >>>
    >>> Secondary to this, I'd probably need to wipe the older keys, as the
    >>> newer CDs have different keys. A regular repair seems to want the
    >>> original install CD, which, in this case, would defeat the purpose.

    >
    >
    >"pip22" <pip22.44qzaq@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
    >news:pip22.44qzaq@no.email.invalid...
    >
    >> You don't need the original CD to perform a repair-install, but the CD
    >> must contain exactly the same edition of Windows (and same service-pack
    >> level) as the installation you want to repair. Also, a repair-install
    >> does not ask for the CD-key, and the existing (installed) key remains
    >> the same when repair is completed.

    >(SNIP)
    >
    >pip22 (& DD)...
    >While it is true one needs to use the same edition (e.g., Home or Pro, etc.)
    >as the XP OS one is attempting to Repair, it's not mandatory that the XP OS
    >installation CD contain the same Service Pack level. For example, as long as
    >a user will be booting to the XP OS installation CD that contains SP2 and
    >the installed OS he or she is trying to Repair contains SP3, the Repair
    >install could be undertaken with that CD. Assuming the Repair install is
    >successful the user could then install SP3 onto the system.
    >
    >Having said that...
    >
    >All things considered, for obvious reasons, it would generally be best (in
    >the above example) to use a "slipstreamed" XP OS installation CD that
    >contained SP3.
    >Anna


    That's what I did in this case (slipstreamed SP3). As mentioned, in
    past years, I had tried something similar with a slipstreamed SP2 CD,
    but that failed. Not sure what was different this time.

    The install process did ask for the new key, BTW.
     

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