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recover directories like found.000

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by nks, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. nks

    nks Flightless Bird

    hello
    I use O.S. windows xp
    i have an external hdd
    Almost all the data disappeared and i found directories hidden founf.001, ecc


    i know that usually this directories s appears after defrag or scandisk but
    i didnt run it.


    can i recover the data?
    If i run a scandisk I ll recover the hdd? Or i ll lose all my data?

    thnks
     
  2. Teneo

    Teneo Flightless Bird

    Bit difficult to recover from those, try a file recovery program, plenty of
    free on the net

    One is

    http://www.piriform.com/recuva



    "nks" <nks@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:419272EE-DEDB-4121-9F49-A30448E1D481@microsoft.com...
    > hello
    > I use O.S. windows xp
    > i have an external hdd
    > Almost all the data disappeared and i found directories hidden founf.001,
    > ecc
    >
    >
    > i know that usually this directories s appears after defrag or scandisk
    > but
    > i didnt run it.
    >
    >
    > can i recover the data?
    > If i run a scandisk I ll recover the hdd? Or i ll lose all my data?
    >
    > thnks
    >
     
  3. Nil

    Nil Flightless Bird

    On 22 Mar 2010, =?Utf-8?B?bmtz?= <nks@discussions.microsoft.com>
    wrote in microsoft.public.windowsxp.general:

    > can i recover the data?


    Not automatically and not reliably. If the file names inside the folder
    have been munged, you just have to guess what each one is. Try
    examining them with a binary file viewer or hex editor.
     
  4. smlunatick

    smlunatick Flightless Bird

    On Mar 22, 8:36 am, nks <n...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > hello
    > I use O.S. windows xp
    > i have an external hdd
    > Almost all the data disappeared and i found directories hidden  founf.001, ecc
    >
    > i know that usually this directories s appears after  defrag or scandisk but
    > i didnt run it.
    >
    > can i recover the data?
    > If   i run a scandisk I ll recover the hdd?  Or i  ll lose all my data?
    >
    > thnks


    These files / directories are usually the result of Chkdsk / Scandisk
    scans. It has always be extremely difficult to re-build data from
    these.
     
  5. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 12:40:08 -0700 (PDT), smlunatick
    <yveslec@gmail.com> wrote:

    >On Mar 22, 8:36 am, nks <n...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    >> hello
    >> I use O.S. windows xp
    >> i have an external hdd
    >> Almost all the data disappeared and i found directories hidden  founf.001, ecc
    >>
    >> i know that usually this directories s appears after  defrag or scandisk but
    >> i didnt run it.
    >>
    >> can i recover the data?
    >> If   i run a scandisk I ll recover the hdd?  Or i  ll lose all my data?


    I don't know if any of your files will be there or not. And what I
    say below only applies to text files, or ascii files that you can
    read, to decide where they end. But you called it data so maybe it
    is like that.

    >> thnks

    >
    >These files / directories are usually the result of Chkdsk / Scandisk
    >scans. It has always be extremely difficult to re-build data from
    >these.


    When I hae files missing (which used to happen after a crash
    sometimes) I found that chkdsk made one file for every file that was
    missing. This was clear with text files and some ASCII data files
    when I knew what the data looked like. The file itself was at the
    beginning of the chkdsk file and after a certain point, there was just
    garbage I guess whatever was in the cluster before the chkdsk wront a
    file to it. Some editors have no limit on the size of hte file they
    will edit, and with that, one could delete the part that was garbage
    at the end, and rename the resulting file back to the original name,
    and put it in the original directory. Since every file you find will
    be at most only one file that you want, well, I don't know what your
    results will be.

    The best and by far the fastest way to look at dozens or hundreds of
    files, most of which you won't want to edit, is by using TCC LE 10.0
    or 11.0, which is now free at www.jpsoft.com . It may be hard to find
    it there, and if so write me, but before you do that google TCC LE
    download That's how I found it the last time. It's right there on
    the jpsoft site, and I found it there once, but the next time I
    couldn't. It is free for individual use. Once you have installed
    that, use the List command. All you do is press esc and it will go to
    the next file, no matter how long it is, in an instant. No file
    loading time. I used it a lot to look at chkdsk files.


    I miss mainframes, where one can copy a designated number of bytes
    from one file to another. Either at the start or even in the middle.
    Isn't there a dos command or windows program that will do that? I've
    looked and the only way seems to be an editor. But I don't think it
    matters here because the method above works.


    OTOH, some programas like newsreaders and email programs write loads
    of posts or emails for example to the same file, I had a program with
    a bug, and it didn't update that outbox file when it said it did, and
    when there was a crash, every post I had written in that sesssion was
    lost. In that case I had to remember some keywords from one of my
    posts, and hunt through the whole harddrive for them, (Harddrives were
    a lot smaller than, but slower) and there would be mulitiple
    occurrences if I had saved any email or post more than once while
    writing it, but when I eventually found the last version, it was like
    a mother load, and I could pretty quickly copy out each one
    separately, skipping the header information which was there, and
    resend them or save them or whatever. For that I used the Norton
    Utility diskedit, which ran in DOS. (There is some sort of disk
    editor Norton includes that runs in windows iirc, but it can't do what
    the dos version does.) Whether it runs in XP cmd, I don't know,
    because the bug I mention was fixed years ago.


    Now you have learned why you should backup every day, or more often,
    or at least every time you get something you value.
     
  6. Nil

    Nil Flightless Bird

    On 23 Mar 2010, mm <NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in
    microsoft.public.windowsxp.general:

    > The best and by far the fastest way to look at dozens or hundreds
    > of files, most of which you won't want to edit, is by using TCC LE
    > 10.0 or 11.0, which is now free at www.jpsoft.com . It may be
    > hard to find it there, and if so write me, but before you do that
    > google TCC LE download That's how I found it the last time.
    > It's right there on the jpsoft site, and I found it there once,
    > but the next time I couldn't.


    <http://www.jpsoft.com/download.htm>
     
  7. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 14:21:27 -0400, Nil
    <rednoise@REMOVETHIScomcast.net> wrote:

    >On 23 Mar 2010, mm <NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in
    >microsoft.public.windowsxp.general:
    >
    >> The best and by far the fastest way to look at dozens or hundreds
    >> of files, most of which you won't want to edit, is by using TCC LE
    >> 10.0 or 11.0, which is now free at www.jpsoft.com . It may be
    >> hard to find it there, and if so write me, but before you do that
    >> google TCC LE download That's how I found it the last time.
    >> It's right there on the jpsoft site, and I found it there once,
    >> but the next time I couldn't.

    >
    ><http://www.jpsoft.com/download.htm>


    LOL. That was simple. I guess when it says 30 days free trial, it's
    really forever with TCC LE. I used to see a page where it said that,
    and there probably still is one somewhere, but this will dl it.

    Thanks.
     

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