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Re: Controlling Sequence In Which Applications Are Shut Down?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by John Wunderlich, May 4, 2010.

  1. John Wunderlich

    John Wunderlich Flightless Bird

    "(PeteCresswell)" <x@y.Invalid> wrote in
    news:9qo0u5hmesnltu219d19r2lhq8jlh4ltmp@4ax.com:

    > I just ran into a situation where:
    >
    > - I was connecting to a PC remotely using something
    > called "TeamViewer"
    >
    > - I upgraded MS Office to 2007
    >
    > - The Office install had to re-booted the PC
    >
    > - During the shutdown process, TeamViewer got
    > killed before it got to some other applications
    > like Excel and some that I have never heard of.
    >
    > - Those applications issued prompts that needed tb
    > replied to in order to continue the shutdown
    >
    > - I couldn't reply bc my connection had been shut
    > down by virtue of TeamViewer having been killed.
    >
    > - Had to drive to the site, hook up a monitor/keyboard
    > to the PC and take it from there.
    >
    >
    > Seems like I'd want to set things up so that TeamViewer
    > was always the last application to be terminated in the
    > event of a PC shutdown and/or reboot.
    >
    > Is there a way?


    The best practice is to quit all programs before doing an install.

    Barring that, most installs that need a reboot will pause at the end
    and allow you to "Reboot Later" or at least pause and make you hit the
    "OK" button. If Reboot Later is a choice pick that. Then hit:
    Start -> Run
    and in the box that pops up, enter the following command:
    shutdown -r -f -t 60

    This will start a 60 second timer (giving you time to gracefully log
    off thereby stopping your applications) after which the computer will
    reboot. The "-f" option is supposed to force all running applications
    to quit without displaying any confirmation dialog. This works most of
    the time, but there are exceptions.

    HTH,
    John
     

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