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Printer and Task Scheduler Definitions

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Peter Marshall, Feb 23, 2010.

  1. Peter Marshall

    Peter Marshall Flightless Bird

    Is there a file or folder of files on WinXP that defines the PC's printer
    definitions and Scheduled Tasks. If so, it would be much easier to
    replicate these to a new PC or back them up for safety.

    --

    Peter Marshall
    Manager Information Services
    Ohio Coatings Company
     
  2. pip22

    pip22 Flightless Bird

    What do you mean by "printer definitions" - I've never heard of those
    and I've been a PC user/builder for over 10 years?
     
  3. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Feb 23, 9:37 am, "Peter Marshall"
    <peter.marsh...@ohiocoatingscompany.com> wrote:
    > Is there a file or folder of files on WinXP that defines the PC's printer
    > definitions and Scheduled Tasks.  If so, it would be much easier to
    > replicate these to a new PC or back them up for safety.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Peter Marshall
    > Manager Information Services
    > Ohio Coatings Company


    I don't know about printer definitions, but scheduled tasks can be
    backed up and copied and are generally here:

    c:/windows\tasks

    You can certainly back them up and copy them for safety or even copy
    them to another computer, but the tasks will only run on the new
    computer if the task credentials (user and password) and all the
    permissions are exactly the same between the computers.

    Copying the task might save some time, but the task might need
    tweaking in the credentials areas to get it to run...

    That will usually generate the "oh yeah..." moment later, so think
    about it now.
     
  4. Peter Marshall

    Peter Marshall Flightless Bird

    Thank you, Jose! That's exactly what I was looking for. I have a PC
    dedicated to doing scheduled tasks 24/7, and if it would crash, recreating
    those tasks would be a real pain. In this case, I don't think the
    credentials would be a problem.

    --

    Peter Marshall
    Manager Information Services
    Ohio Coatings Company
    "Jose" <jose_ease@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:9b022e41-63b0-4bde-a0c8-80696394687f@g10g2000yqh.googlegroups.com...
    On Feb 23, 9:37 am, "Peter Marshall"
    <peter.marsh...@ohiocoatingscompany.com> wrote:
    > Is there a file or folder of files on WinXP that defines the PC's printer
    > definitions and Scheduled Tasks. If so, it would be much easier to
    > replicate these to a new PC or back them up for safety.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Peter Marshall
    > Manager Information Services
    > Ohio Coatings Company


    I don't know about printer definitions, but scheduled tasks can be
    backed up and copied and are generally here:

    c:/windows\tasks

    You can certainly back them up and copy them for safety or even copy
    them to another computer, but the tasks will only run on the new
    computer if the task credentials (user and password) and all the
    permissions are exactly the same between the computers.

    Copying the task might save some time, but the task might need
    tweaking in the credentials areas to get it to run...

    That will usually generate the "oh yeah..." moment later, so think
    about it now.
     
  5. Peter Marshall

    Peter Marshall Flightless Bird

    I am hoping that when you create a new printer definition (Add Printer) on a
    PC that a printer definition file would be created and could be
    copied/archived.

    --

    Peter Marshall
    Manager Information Services
    Ohio Coatings Company
    "pip22" <pip22.46wuma@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
    news:pip22.46wuma@no.email.invalid...
    >
    > What do you mean by "printer definitions" - I've never heard of those
    > and I've been a PC user/builder for over 10 years?
    >
    >
     
  6. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Feb 25, 10:42 am, "Peter Marshall"
    <peter.marsh...@ohiocoatingscompany.com> wrote:
    > I am hoping that when you create a new printer definition (Add Printer) on a
    > PC that a printer definition file would be created and could be
    > copied/archived.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Peter Marshall
    > Manager Information Services
    > Ohio Coatings Company"pip22" <pip22.46w...@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
    >
    > news:pip22.46wuma@no.email.invalid...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > What do you mean by "printer definitions" - I've never heard of those
    > > and I've been a PC user/builder for over 10 years?


    I am pretty sure printers are a little more involved than just copying
    some files. Scheduled Tasks are pretty easy.

    Maybe if you try to ask your question a different way and/or explain
    what you are trying to accomplish you will get some ideas.

    Do you need to just backup and save some settings on a single computer
    once you have them the way you want, do you want to take some printer
    and tasks that you know work and propagate them out to a bunch of
    different computers, do you need to be able to quickly reapply or
    reset some settings that have gotten somehow messed up...
     
  7. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Feb 25, 10:40 am, "Peter Marshall"
    <peter.marsh...@ohiocoatingscompany.com> wrote:
    > Thank you, Jose!  That's exactly what I was looking for.  I have a PC
    > dedicated to doing scheduled tasks 24/7, and if it would crash, recreating
    > those tasks would be a real pain.  In this case, I don't think the
    > credentials would be a problem.
    >
    > --



    Good.

    I thought later it might improve your confidence and understanding of
    the STs to copy one from c:/windows\tasks (they are just files) to
    another folder, delete the original, reboot, verify the original ST is
    really gone, bring the copy back where it belongs, test the replaced
    task by running it manually (right click the task, Run).

    If there should be some kind of issue, it would be better to figure it
    out now instead of later.
     

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