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Plugged in USB 2.0 HD Not recoginized in Windows XP

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Keith, Feb 9, 2010.

  1. Keith

    Keith Flightless Bird

    I have a USB 2.0 HD enclosure with a 100 GB HD. I can plug the HD into a
    Windows 7 machine and the HD is displayed properly in windows explorer.
    However in windows XP the device is recognized and listed by the hardware
    manager, but windows XP can not see the HD. What should I check in WinXP SP3
    to see why the USB HD is not being mounted in windows? BTW, the HD is
    formatted in NTFS format.

    TIA

    --
    Best Regards, Keith
    http://home.comcast.net/~kilowattradio/
    Tired of Google Groups?
    http://home.comcast.net/~kilowattradio/usenet.html
     
  2. boatman312

    boatman312 Flightless Bird

    On 02/09/10 3:57 AM, Keith wrote:
    > I have a USB 2.0 HD enclosure with a 100 GB HD. I can plug the HD into a
    > Windows 7 machine and the HD is displayed properly in windows explorer.
    > However in windows XP the device is recognized and listed by the hardware
    > manager, but windows XP can not see the HD. What should I check in WinXP SP3
    > to see why the USB HD is not being mounted in windows? BTW, the HD is
    > formatted in NTFS format.
    >
    > TIA
    >


    First, try another USB port. If that doesn't work, open Disk Manager:

    Start>Run>"diskmgmt.msc" without the quotes.

    Look for the drive there. If it's there, you might have to change the
    drive letter to one that's unused.

    If it's not there, report back here.
     
  3. Keith

    Keith Flightless Bird

    On Tue, 09 Feb 2010 07:03:15 -0500, boatman312 <eracars@gmail.com> wrote:

    > On 02/09/10 3:57 AM, Keith wrote:
    > > I have a USB 2.0 HD enclosure with a 100 GB HD. I can plug the HD into a
    > > Windows 7 machine and the HD is displayed properly in windows explorer.
    > > However in windows XP the device is recognized and listed by the hardware
    > > manager, but windows XP can not see the HD. What should I check in WinXP SP3
    > > to see why the USB HD is not being mounted in windows? BTW, the HD is
    > > formatted in NTFS format.
    > >
    > > TIA
    > >

    >
    > First, try another USB port. If that doesn't work, open Disk Manager:
    >
    > Start>Run>"diskmgmt.msc" without the quotes.
    >
    > Look for the drive there. If it's there, you might have to change the
    > drive letter to one that's unused.
    >
    > If it's not there, report back here.


    Yes it is listed, however the manager says that it is a healthy GPT Protective
    Partition. In Win7 it is listed as a NTFS partition.
    --
    Best Regards, Keith
    http://home.comcast.net/~kilowattradio/
    Tired of Google Groups?
    http://home.comcast.net/~kilowattradio/usenet.html
     
  4. boatman312

    boatman312 Flightless Bird

    On 02/09/10 8:16 AM, Keith wrote:
    > On Tue, 09 Feb 2010 07:03:15 -0500, boatman312<eracars@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >> On 02/09/10 3:57 AM, Keith wrote:
    >>> I have a USB 2.0 HD enclosure with a 100 GB HD. I can plug the HD into a
    >>> Windows 7 machine and the HD is displayed properly in windows explorer.
    >>> However in windows XP the device is recognized and listed by the hardware
    >>> manager, but windows XP can not see the HD. What should I check in WinXP SP3
    >>> to see why the USB HD is not being mounted in windows? BTW, the HD is
    >>> formatted in NTFS format.
    >>>
    >>> TIA
    >>>

    >>
    >> First, try another USB port. If that doesn't work, open Disk Manager:
    >>
    >> Start>Run>"diskmgmt.msc" without the quotes.
    >>
    >> Look for the drive there. If it's there, you might have to change the
    >> drive letter to one that's unused.
    >>
    >> If it's not there, report back here.

    >
    > Yes it is listed, however the manager says that it is a healthy GPT Protective
    > Partition. In Win7 it is listed as a NTFS partition.


    The partition was formatted from a 64 bit OS and not compatible with WinXP.

    Take a look here (Google is your friend...):

    http://computerhelpforum.org/forum/hardware/f8/gpt_protective_partition/t11614.html
     
  5. Keith

    Keith Flightless Bird

    On Tue, 09 Feb 2010 09:11:19 -0500, boatman312 <eracars@gmail.com> wrote:

    > On 02/09/10 8:16 AM, Keith wrote:
    > > On Tue, 09 Feb 2010 07:03:15 -0500, boatman312<eracars@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On 02/09/10 3:57 AM, Keith wrote:
    > >>> I have a USB 2.0 HD enclosure with a 100 GB HD. I can plug the HD into a
    > >>> Windows 7 machine and the HD is displayed properly in windows explorer.
    > >>> However in windows XP the device is recognized and listed by the hardware
    > >>> manager, but windows XP can not see the HD. What should I check in WinXP SP3
    > >>> to see why the USB HD is not being mounted in windows? BTW, the HD is
    > >>> formatted in NTFS format.
    > >>>
    > >>> TIA
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >> First, try another USB port. If that doesn't work, open Disk Manager:
    > >>
    > >> Start>Run>"diskmgmt.msc" without the quotes.
    > >>
    > >> Look for the drive there. If it's there, you might have to change the
    > >> drive letter to one that's unused.
    > >>
    > >> If it's not there, report back here.

    > >
    > > Yes it is listed, however the manager says that it is a healthy GPT Protective
    > > Partition. In Win7 it is listed as a NTFS partition.

    >
    > The partition was formatted from a 64 bit OS and not compatible with WinXP.
    >
    > Take a look here (Google is your friend...):
    >
    > http://computerhelpforum.org/forum/hardware/f8/gpt_protective_partition/t11614.html


    Thanks, I learn something new every day.
    --
    Best Regards, Keith
    http://home.comcast.net/~kilowattradio/
    Tired of Google Groups?
    http://home.comcast.net/~kilowattradio/usenet.html
     
  6. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Keith wrote:
    > On Tue, 09 Feb 2010 09:11:19 -0500, boatman312 <eracars@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >> On 02/09/10 8:16 AM, Keith wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 09 Feb 2010 07:03:15 -0500, boatman312<eracars@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 02/09/10 3:57 AM, Keith wrote:
    >>>>> I have a USB 2.0 HD enclosure with a 100 GB HD. I can plug the HD into a
    >>>>> Windows 7 machine and the HD is displayed properly in windows explorer.
    >>>>> However in windows XP the device is recognized and listed by the hardware
    >>>>> manager, but windows XP can not see the HD. What should I check in WinXP SP3
    >>>>> to see why the USB HD is not being mounted in windows? BTW, the HD is
    >>>>> formatted in NTFS format.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> TIA
    >>>>>
    >>>> First, try another USB port. If that doesn't work, open Disk Manager:
    >>>>
    >>>> Start>Run>"diskmgmt.msc" without the quotes.
    >>>>
    >>>> Look for the drive there. If it's there, you might have to change the
    >>>> drive letter to one that's unused.
    >>>>
    >>>> If it's not there, report back here.
    >>> Yes it is listed, however the manager says that it is a healthy GPT Protective
    >>> Partition. In Win7 it is listed as a NTFS partition.

    >> The partition was formatted from a 64 bit OS and not compatible with WinXP.
    >>
    >> Take a look here (Google is your friend...):
    >>
    >> http://computerhelpforum.org/forum/hardware/f8/gpt_protective_partition/t11614.html

    >
    > Thanks, I learn something new every day.


    There is an article here you can look at.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table

    "Legacy MBR (LBA 0)

    The MBR at the beginning of the disk was originally designed to prevent
    MBR-based disk utilities from mis-recognizing, and possibly over-writing,
    GPT disks (however, in Operating Systems that support GPT-based boot, it is
    nowadays also used to store the first stage of the bootloader). A single
    partition type of 0xEE, encompassing the entire GPT drive, is indicated
    and identifies it as GPT."

    That might be what you're seeing in Disk Management.

    Maybe you could prepare the drive in WinXP and then humbly offer it to your
    new OS ? You'd hope that a plain NTFS drive, would be portable.

    Paul
     
  7. John Wunderlich

    John Wunderlich Flightless Bird

    >>> Yes it is listed, however the manager says that it is a healthy
    >>> GPT Protective Partition. In Win7 it is listed as a NTFS
    >>> partition.

    >>
    >> The partition was formatted from a 64 bit OS and not compatible
    >> with WinXP.
    >>
    >> Take a look here (Google is your friend...):
    >>
    >> http://computerhelpforum.org/forum/hardware/f8/gpt_protective_part
    >> ition/t11614.html

    >
    > Thanks, I learn something new every day.


    From Microsoft KB:

    "HOW TO: Change a GUID Partition Table Disk into a Master Boot Record
    Disk in Windows XP"

    <http://support.microsoft.com/kb/282793/>

    HTH,
    John
     
  8. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    Keith wrote:

    > Yes it is listed, however the manager says that it is a healthy GPT Protective
    > Partition. In Win7 it is listed as a NTFS partition.


    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/302873
    See "Why does the GUID Partition Table have a Protective MBR?"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table
    "Windows XP 32-bit (the most prevalent version of Windows XP) and earlier
    Windows systems cannot (without hacks) read or write to drives formatted
    with a GUID partition table, however, Vista and Windows 7 include this
    capability"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_boot_record
    "Where a data storage device has been partitioned with the GPT scheme, the
    Master Boot Record will still contain a partition table, but its only
    purpose is to indicate the existence of the GUID Table and to prevent
    utility programs that understand only the MBR Partition Table scheme from
    creating any partitions in what they would see as free space on the disk,
    thereby accidentally erasing the GUID table."
     
  9. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    VanguardLH wrote:

    > Keith wrote:
    >
    >> Yes it is listed, however the manager says that it is a healthy GPT Protective
    >> Partition. In Win7 it is listed as a NTFS partition.

    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/302873
    > See "Why does the GUID Partition Table have a Protective MBR?"
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table
    > "Windows XP 32-bit (the most prevalent version of Windows XP) and earlier
    > Windows systems cannot (without hacks) read or write to drives formatted
    > with a GUID partition table, however, Vista and Windows 7 include this
    > capability"
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_boot_record
    > "Where a data storage device has been partitioned with the GPT scheme, the
    > Master Boot Record will still contain a partition table, but its only
    > purpose is to indicate the existence of the GUID Table and to prevent
    > utility programs that understand only the MBR Partition Table scheme from
    > creating any partitions in what they would see as free space on the disk,
    > thereby accidentally erasing the GUID table."


    In addition (I haven't done this so it's at your own risk):

    To remove the GPT and revert to the old standard MBR structure with
    partition tables, use the 'diskpart' program included in Windows.
    - Open a command shell:
    Start -> Run menu
    Enter: cmd.exe
    - At the command prompt, run:
    diskpart
    - List all the disk IDs on your host (under the "Disk ###" column):
    list disk
    - Select the device to change focus to it for further commands:
    select <disk id#>
    (for example, "select disk 5")
    - Show details for the selected disk (helps ensure you pick the right one):
    detail disk
    - Clean the MBR record:
    clean
    - Load the Disk Management applet (diskmgmt.msc).
    - The cleaned disk should now show as "unallocated" (no partitions).
    - Right-click on a disk info and select "Initialize Disk".
    o If running a 64-bit version of Windows, the schemes are:
    Master Boot Record (MBR)
    GUID Protective Partition (GPT)
    o MBR is usable on 32/64-bit Windows. GPT only on 64-bit Windows.
    o This disk is initialized as a "basic disk".
    o All data is erased on the disk.
     

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