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Office Picture Manager diffilculties Resizing Converting

Discussion in 'Microsoft Office' started by Vincent, Feb 25, 2010.

  1. Vincent

    Vincent Flightless Bird

    As I understand the measure Pixel is a relative one, depending on
    (screen/printer) resolution One pixel measures different. Yet pixels are
    treated like something absolute, like one measure to add to centimeters and
    inches.
    Which therefor makes it difficult to convert 1000 pixels to a compareable
    measurement.
    Converting cm to inches is merely a question of multiplying a number, this
    can never be done using pixels... Right?

    Did I miss something?
    --
     
  2. db

    db Flightless Bird

    picture manager doesn't
    have all the fancy features
    that a full fledge graphics
    program can offer.

    for example, in a full fledge
    graphics program you can
    set the image to 10 pixels
    per inch and set the canvas to
    be 20" by 30" which would
    make overall size of the file
    on the disk to be perhaps
    2 megs.

    but the above would be
    a image of poor quality
    unless you were being
    artistic.

    on the other hand you can
    set an image to be 1000
    pixels per inch and set the
    canvas size to 4" x 6" which
    would make the overall size
    of the file on the disk to maybe
    80 megs


    so as you can see by the
    above pixels are not absolute
    or relative to the size of
    the canvas

    you just need to use a high
    level graphics editor to manage
    these variables.

    incidentally, to print a good
    looking 4 x 6 picture it should
    have between 260 - 300
    pixels per inch which would make
    its file size around 2 megs.









    --

    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
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    ~~~~~~~~~~"share the nirvana" - dbZen

    >
    >


    "Vincent" <vincent.jonsson@chello.se> wrote in message news:1AD33FA5-7B13-4556-8C8C-B196D1B4EB09@microsoft.com...
    > As I understand the measure Pixel is a relative one, depending on
    > (screen/printer) resolution One pixel measures different. Yet pixels are
    > treated like something absolute, like one measure to add to centimeters and
    > inches.
    > Which therefor makes it difficult to convert 1000 pixels to a compareable
    > measurement.
    > Converting cm to inches is merely a question of multiplying a number, this
    > can never be done using pixels... Right?
    >
    > Did I miss something?
    > --
    >
     
  3. Bob I

    Bob I Flightless Bird

    No, a pixel is a unit of information it contains the color of a spot.
    How many of those spots are placed in particular area is called
    resolution. Whether you use CM or inches is immaterial as that is merely
    defining the same area using a different unit of measure.

    Vincent wrote:
    > As I understand the measure Pixel is a relative one, depending on
    > (screen/printer) resolution One pixel measures different. Yet pixels are
    > treated like something absolute, like one measure to add to centimeters and
    > inches.
    > Which therefor makes it difficult to convert 1000 pixels to a compareable
    > measurement.
    > Converting cm to inches is merely a question of multiplying a number, this
    > can never be done using pixels... Right?
    >
    > Did I miss something?
     
  4. Steve Rindsberg

    Steve Rindsberg Flightless Bird

    In article <1AD33FA5-7B13-4556-8C8C-B196D1B4EB09@microsoft.com>, Vincent wrote:
    > As I understand the measure Pixel is a relative one, depending on
    > (screen/printer) resolution One pixel measures different.


    If we're talking about pixels in an image file, a pixel is just a series of
    numbers representing one color sample (dot if you like) in the image.

    When the image is displayed or printed, it appears on a device that has
    measurable pixel sizes (a 1200 dot per inch printer, for example).

    > Yet pixels are
    > treated like something absolute, like one measure to add to centimeters and
    > inches.


    When a program imports an image, it usually needs to assign it some size in
    inches/cm/whatever. It needs to know how large to display the image. Some
    images can also contain data that says "Make me 5" wide" or similar. Some
    don't. In the case of the ones that don't, the program has to make an
    arbitrary decision; PowerPoint, for example, assumes 72 or 96 or some other DPI
    value, depending on version. So a 1000 pixel image will import at 1000/72
    inches.

    > Which therefor makes it difficult to convert 1000 pixels to a compareable
    > measurement.
    > Converting cm to inches is merely a question of multiplying a number, this
    > can never be done using pixels... Right?


    Not sure I understand this last ... can you explain what you're after here?
     

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