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Moving Files To New Hard Drive

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by ampig, Jan 4, 2010.

  1. ampig

    ampig Flightless Bird

    I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had 80GB
    and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002. How do I
    go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?
     
  2. Mark Adams

    Mark Adams Flightless Bird

    "ampig" wrote:

    >
    > I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had 80GB
    > and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002. How do I
    > go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?
    >
    >


    Use the cloning software that came with the new disk to clone the old disk
    to the new. Everything is copied to the new disk and the installation is
    bootable just as the old disk. When the cloning process has finished, shut
    the machine down and remove the original disk before restarting. Do not
    reformat the old disk until you are sure the cloned disk functions normally.
     
  3. Mauricio

    Mauricio Flightless Bird

    On Jan 4, 12:37 pm, ampig <ampig.44a...@no.email.invalid> wrote:
    > I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had 80GB
    > and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002. How do I
    > go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?


    Do you want to increase your partitions to use up the entire new drive
    or not?
     
  4. (PeteCresswell)

    (PeteCresswell) Flightless Bird

    Per ampig:
    >
    >I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had 80GB
    >and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002. How do I
    >go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?


    My suggestion would be:

    - Don't move *everything*.

    - Leave the system and apps on the 80-gigger (which is
    plenty large enough for both)

    - Move the data to the 250 and change the 250's drive
    letter to "D:" (for "Data").

    - Sell her on the idea of never, *ever* saving anything
    to C: - that everything gets saved to D:.

    - If you want to go the extra mile, move "MyData" and it's
    subdirectories to D:.

    - Now she is in a much better position if the system
    goes South: She just re-images C: from the setup
    disc that probably came with the PC and does not
    lose any data.

    - If she wants to replace that PC with another one,
    all she needs to worry about is copying the stuff
    from D: or just installing that drive on the new box.

    - She is also in a position to back up data much
    more easily: just copy everything on D: to the
    backup.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  5. Patrick Keenan

    Patrick Keenan Flightless Bird

    "ampig" <ampig.44aa6l@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
    news:ampig.44aa6l@no.email.invalid...
    >
    > I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had 80GB
    > and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002. How do I
    > go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?


    Clone it. If you don't have software, download the free trial of Acronis
    True Image.
     
  6. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > Per ampig:
    >>
    >> I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had
    >> 80GB and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002.
    >> How do I go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?

    >
    > My suggestion would be:
    >
    > - Don't move *everything*.
    >
    > - Leave the system and apps on the 80-gigger (which is
    > plenty large enough for both)
    >
    > - Move the data to the 250 and change the 250's drive
    > letter to "D:" (for "Data").
    >
    > - Sell her on the idea of never, *ever* saving anything
    > to C: - that everything gets saved to D:.
    >
    > - If you want to go the extra mile, move "MyData" and it's
    > subdirectories to D:.
    >
    > - Now she is in a much better position if the system
    > goes South: She just re-images C: from the setup
    > disc that probably came with the PC and does not
    > lose any data.
    >
    > - If she wants to replace that PC with another one,
    > all she needs to worry about is copying the stuff
    > from D: or just installing that drive on the new box.
    >
    > - She is also in a position to back up data much
    > more easily: just copy everything on D: to the
    > backup.


    I like this suggestion.

    I would like to add that if OP's girlfriend uses OE, the Message Store
    and Address Book can be relocated to D: as well.
     
  7. ~Sage

    ~Sage Flightless Bird

    On Jan 4, 4:19 pm, Mark Adams <MarkAd...@discussions.microsoft.com>
    wrote:
    > "ampig" wrote:
    >
    > > I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had 80GB
    > > and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002. How do I
    > > go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?

    >
    > Use the cloning software that came with the new disk to clone the old disk
    > to the new. Everything is copied to the new disk and the installation is
    > bootable just as the old disk. When the cloning process has finished, shut
    > the machine down and remove the original disk before restarting. Do not
    > reformat the old disk until you are sure the cloned disk functions normally.


    Will this procedure work for an OEM XP version installed on a HD? My
    HD on another PC is failing and this looks to be a good solution,
    considering I only have restore disks, not the XP cd.

    ~Sage
     
  8. Mark Adams

    Mark Adams Flightless Bird

    "~Sage" wrote:

    > On Jan 4, 4:19 pm, Mark Adams <MarkAd...@discussions.microsoft.com>
    > wrote:
    > > "ampig" wrote:
    > >
    > > > I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had 80GB
    > > > and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002. How do I
    > > > go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?

    > >
    > > Use the cloning software that came with the new disk to clone the old disk
    > > to the new. Everything is copied to the new disk and the installation is
    > > bootable just as the old disk. When the cloning process has finished, shut
    > > the machine down and remove the original disk before restarting. Do not
    > > reformat the old disk until you are sure the cloned disk functions normally.

    >
    > Will this procedure work for an OEM XP version installed on a HD? My
    > HD on another PC is failing and this looks to be a good solution,
    > considering I only have restore disks, not the XP cd.
    >
    > ~Sage
    > .
    >


    Sage, as far as I know you can clone any kind of operating system using this
    procedure, as long as the source hard drive is in good enough shape to copy
    the data off. The cloning tools that come from the hard drive manufacturers
    are generally brand specific, meaning that the tool must come from the maker
    of one of the drives (usually the destination drive). If your new hard drive
    didn't come with a utility CD, you can download the utility from the maker's
    website. You can get versions that can run from a floppy or a CD.

    To use the cloning tool, Slave the new drive into your computer. Set the
    computer to boot from the floppy or CD, put the disk in the drive and boot
    the machine. Follow the instructions that came with new hard drive to make
    the clone. The process runs off the boot disk while Windows isn't even
    running, so it just copies everything from the source drive to the
    destination drive regardless of what kind of data it is. This includes all
    the viruses, spyware, and other malware that your source drive contains! ;-)

    When the cloning is done, shut down the computer and remove the source
    drive. Remove the utility disk from the drive and reboot the machine. It
    should now boot on the new drive. Don't reformat the old drive until you are
    absolutely sure that the clone is functioning correctly.
     
  9. Barry Watzman

    Barry Watzman Flightless Bird

    Use cloning or Image backup software. If you bought a major brand
    (Western Digital, Seagate, Hitachi and one or two others) FULL RETAIL
    BOXED drive, you might have gotten such software with the drive. It's
    also possible that you can download such software if you got an OEM
    drive (Western Digital has had, at times, downloadable versions of
    Acronis drive software modified to work ONLY with Western Digital
    drives). Otherwise you will have to find freeware or buy something.

    After you get the partition copied to the new drive and bootable, it may
    be only it's original size. You can use the "extend" command in Windows
    XP to expand it, but, note, you will have to mount the 250GB drive as a
    SECOND drive with some other drive as the boot drive (or even on another
    computer) to do that. You can't use the extend command on an active
    "C:" partition while Windows is running from that partition. Use the
    Windows Help function to learn how to use the extend command (it's a
    command line (DOS) command).

    There are some pitfalls here; sometimes after you copy a partition, the
    new drive won't boot. This can usually be fixed by running FDISK/MBR on
    the drive from a bootable floppy or CD with DOS and FDISK on it. I have
    no idea why this works, but it usually does. Do it BEFORE expanding or
    creating any partitions that would go beyond the first 137 [decimal]
    gigabytes of the drive.


    ampig wrote:
    > I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had 80GB
    > and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002. How do I
    > go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?
    >
    >
     
  10. ~Sage

    ~Sage Flightless Bird

    On Jan 5, 9:34 am, Mark Adams <MarkAd...@discussions.microsoft.com>
    wrote:
    > "~Sage" wrote:
    > > On Jan 4, 4:19 pm, Mark Adams <MarkAd...@discussions.microsoft.com>
    > > wrote:
    > > > "ampig" wrote:

    >
    > > > > I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had 80GB
    > > > > and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002. How do I
    > > > > go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?

    >
    > > > Use the cloning software that came with the new disk to clone the olddisk
    > > > to the new. Everything is copied to the new disk and the installationis
    > > > bootable just as the old disk. When the cloning process has finished,shut
    > > > the machine down and remove the original disk before restarting. Do not
    > > > reformat the old disk until you are sure the cloned disk functions normally.

    >
    > > Will this procedure work for an OEM XP version installed on a HD?  My
    > > HD on another PC is failing and this looks to be a good solution,
    > > considering I only have restore disks, not the XP cd.

    >
    > > ~Sage
    > > .

    >
    > Sage, as far as I know you can clone any kind of operating system using this
    > procedure, as long as the source hard drive is in good enough shape to copy
    > the data off. The cloning tools that come from the hard drive manufacturers
    > are generally brand specific, meaning that the tool must come from the maker
    > of one of the drives (usually the destination drive). If your new hard drive
    > didn't come with a utility CD, you can download the utility from the maker's
    > website. You can get versions that can run from a floppy or a CD.
    >
    > To use the cloning tool, Slave the new drive into your computer. Set the
    > computer to boot from the floppy or CD, put the disk in the drive and boot
    > the machine. Follow the instructions that came with new hard drive to make
    > the clone. The process runs off the boot disk while Windows isn't even
    > running, so it just copies everything from the source drive to the
    > destination drive regardless of what kind of data it is. This includes all
    > the viruses, spyware, and other malware that your source drive contains! ;-)
    >
    > When the cloning is done, shut down the computer and remove the source
    > drive. Remove the utility disk from the drive and reboot the machine. It
    > should now boot on the new drive. Don't reformat the old drive until you are
    > absolutely sure that the clone is functioning correctly.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thank you very much Mark! I don't have a new drive yet, but now I see
    it would be a good move for me to find one that comes with cloning
    software. My drive is clean, no evil things living there, it's just
    sick. ;-)

    ~Sage
     
  11. ampig

    ampig Flightless Bird

    I think that I'll try Pete's suggestion. It seems simple and logical for
    a non techie like myself.
     
  12. (PeteCresswell)

    (PeteCresswell) Flightless Bird

    Per Daave:
    >I like this suggestion.
    >
    >I would like to add that if OP's girlfriend uses OE, the Message Store
    >and Address Book can be relocated to D: as well.


    Seems to me like something in this vein sb built into Windows: A
    single menu or popup (like PowerToys, but simplified) that
    basically asks the user: "Which drive do you want to keep data
    on?".

    Keeping data on the system drive is such a patently bad idea that
    I can't, for the life of me, figure out why MS would encourage it
    through defaults.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  13. (PeteCresswell)

    (PeteCresswell) Flightless Bird

    Per (PeteCresswell):
    >Keeping data on the system drive is such a patently bad idea that
    >I can't, for the life of me, figure out why MS would encourage it
    >through defaults.


    Oops... It's starting to dawn on me: the context of re-imaging
    the system would constitute an admission that the Windows OS
    could go South... which I'd guess he marketing people at MS would
    frown on.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  14. Mark Adams

    Mark Adams Flightless Bird

    "~Sage" wrote:

    > On Jan 5, 9:34 am, Mark Adams <MarkAd...@discussions.microsoft.com>
    > wrote:
    > > "~Sage" wrote:
    > > > On Jan 4, 4:19 pm, Mark Adams <MarkAd...@discussions.microsoft.com>
    > > > wrote:
    > > > > "ampig" wrote:

    > >
    > > > > > I just upgraded the hard drive in my girlfriends computer. It had 80GB
    > > > > > and I added an additional 250GB drive. The OS is XP Home 2002. How do I
    > > > > > go about moving _*everything*_ to the larger hard drive?

    > >
    > > > > Use the cloning software that came with the new disk to clone the old disk
    > > > > to the new. Everything is copied to the new disk and the installation is
    > > > > bootable just as the old disk. When the cloning process has finished, shut
    > > > > the machine down and remove the original disk before restarting. Do not
    > > > > reformat the old disk until you are sure the cloned disk functions normally.

    > >
    > > > Will this procedure work for an OEM XP version installed on a HD? My
    > > > HD on another PC is failing and this looks to be a good solution,
    > > > considering I only have restore disks, not the XP cd.

    > >
    > > > ~Sage
    > > > .

    > >
    > > Sage, as far as I know you can clone any kind of operating system using this
    > > procedure, as long as the source hard drive is in good enough shape to copy
    > > the data off. The cloning tools that come from the hard drive manufacturers
    > > are generally brand specific, meaning that the tool must come from the maker
    > > of one of the drives (usually the destination drive). If your new hard drive
    > > didn't come with a utility CD, you can download the utility from the maker's
    > > website. You can get versions that can run from a floppy or a CD.
    > >
    > > To use the cloning tool, Slave the new drive into your computer. Set the
    > > computer to boot from the floppy or CD, put the disk in the drive and boot
    > > the machine. Follow the instructions that came with new hard drive to make
    > > the clone. The process runs off the boot disk while Windows isn't even
    > > running, so it just copies everything from the source drive to the
    > > destination drive regardless of what kind of data it is. This includes all
    > > the viruses, spyware, and other malware that your source drive contains! ;-)
    > >
    > > When the cloning is done, shut down the computer and remove the source
    > > drive. Remove the utility disk from the drive and reboot the machine. It
    > > should now boot on the new drive. Don't reformat the old drive until you are
    > > absolutely sure that the clone is functioning correctly.- Hide quoted text -
    > >
    > > - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Thank you very much Mark! I don't have a new drive yet, but now I see
    > it would be a good move for me to find one that comes with cloning
    > software. My drive is clean, no evil things living there, it's just
    > sick. ;-)
    >
    > ~Sage
    > .
    >


    ~Sage, the hard drive makers also have drive testing utilities for free
    download as well. Test your drive; if it is truely failing, don't waste time
    replacing it. It could go PFFFFFTTTTTT at any moment. Copy your data off to
    external media while you still have a chance.
     
  15. (PeteCresswell)

    (PeteCresswell) Flightless Bird

    Per ampig:
    >I think that I'll try Pete's suggestion. It seems simple and logical for
    >a non techie like myself.


    The only hitch is tracking down the stuff that applications store
    for you automagically like OutLook, MyDocuments, and so-forth.

    It's not rocket science, it's worth the time, but it *does*
    require a little investment.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     

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