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Moving application without installing CD

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by setecastronomy, Apr 1, 2010.

  1. setecastronomy

    setecastronomy Flightless Bird

    Here we have some legacy applications for windows whose installing media went
    lost. We don't even have any contact with the software houses or programmers
    who developed them. We would like to move some of them to new computers but
    it can be a nightmare. Searching on the net I learnt there are commercial
    software which claim to do that dirty work, but I found no clue on how to do
    it manually. In the past I tried to solve a similar scenario using
    sysinternals tools (ProcessMonitor) to understand what files and dlls an
    application needed but I ended up with total failure. Any suggestions ?


    Thanks
    Filippo
     
  2. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    "setecastronomy" <setecastronomy@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:A2BC5191-42CF-4264-BEEC-E8C43B489312@microsoft.com...
    > Here we have some legacy applications for windows whose installing media
    > went
    > lost. We don't even have any contact with the software houses or
    > programmers
    > who developed them. We would like to move some of them to new computers
    > but
    > it can be a nightmare. Searching on the net I learnt there are commercial
    > software which claim to do that dirty work, but I found no clue on how to
    > do
    > it manually. In the past I tried to solve a similar scenario using
    > sysinternals tools (ProcessMonitor) to understand what files and dlls an
    > application needed but I ended up with total failure. Any suggestions ?
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    > Filippo


    With simple applications it is sufficient to copy the application folders to
    the new machine and perhaps also some .dll files in case it complains. With
    complex applications you would have to replicate each and every registry
    entry, which sounds like an impossible task unless they are all clearly
    marked as belonging to this particular application. Your best bet may be to
    replace the applications with new ones that are fully supported and for
    which you implement a formal register to protect yourself against future
    loss. Note also that if these are 16-bit applications, they won't run under
    new OSs such as Windows 7.
     
  3. John Doue

    John Doue Flightless Bird

    On 4/1/2010 10:36 AM, Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >
    >
    > "setecastronomy" <setecastronomy@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
    > message news:A2BC5191-42CF-4264-BEEC-E8C43B489312@microsoft.com...
    >> Here we have some legacy applications for windows whose installing
    >> media went
    >> lost. We don't even have any contact with the software houses or
    >> programmers
    >> who developed them. We would like to move some of them to new
    >> computers but
    >> it can be a nightmare. Searching on the net I learnt there are commercial
    >> software which claim to do that dirty work, but I found no clue on how
    >> to do
    >> it manually. In the past I tried to solve a similar scenario using
    >> sysinternals tools (ProcessMonitor) to understand what files and dlls an
    >> application needed but I ended up with total failure. Any suggestions ?
    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> Filippo

    >
    > With simple applications it is sufficient to copy the application
    > folders to the new machine and perhaps also some .dll files in case it
    > complains. With complex applications you would have to replicate each
    > and every registry entry, which sounds like an impossible task unless
    > they are all clearly marked as belonging to this particular application.
    > Your best bet may be to replace the applications with new ones that are
    > fully supported and for which you implement a formal register to protect
    > yourself against future loss. Note also that if these are 16-bit
    > applications, they won't run under new OSs such as Windows 7.


    One easier -IMHO- option is:

    1/ Run a registry cleaner to get rid of existing issues *after* making a
    backup of it and making sure System Restore is activated.

    2/ Create a restore point.

    3/ Move (not copy) the directory (ies) to their new location, keeping
    the same structure.

    4/ Run again the registry cleaner and make a careful note of what comes
    up as new issues.

    5/ Go into the registry and do a search and replace to replace the old
    locations by the new ones.

    6/ Run again the registry cleaner to see if you missed some registry keys.

    7 / Try running the software.

    Doing this assumes you are familiar with working on the registry, doing
    backups, and restores. Sorry if this sounds patronizing.

    I do not know many tools which can do search and replace in the
    registry. One of them is Powertools, whose registry cleaner and other
    applications I find reliable.

    Good luck.

    --
    John Doue
     
  4. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Thu, 01 Apr 2010 16:06:46 +0300, John Doue <notwobe@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    > 1/ Run a registry cleaner to get rid of existing issues *after* making a
    > backup of it and making sure System Restore is activated.



    Registry cleaning programs are *all* snake oil. Cleaning of the
    registry isn't needed and is dangerous. Leave the registry alone and
    don't use any registry cleaner. Despite what many people think, and
    what vendors of registry cleaning software try to convince you of,
    having unused registry entries doesn't really hurt you.

    The risk of a serious problem caused by a registry cleaner erroneously
    removing an entry you need is far greater than any potential benefit
    it may have.

    Read http://www.edbott.com/weblog/archives/000643.html

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  5. HeyBub

    HeyBub Flightless Bird

    setecastronomy wrote:
    > Here we have some legacy applications for windows whose installing
    > media went lost. We don't even have any contact with the software
    > houses or programmers who developed them. We would like to move some
    > of them to new computers but it can be a nightmare. Searching on the
    > net I learnt there are commercial software which claim to do that
    > dirty work, but I found no clue on how to do it manually. In the past
    > I tried to solve a similar scenario using sysinternals tools
    > (ProcessMonitor) to understand what files and dlls an application
    > needed but I ended up with total failure. Any suggestions ?
    >


    The first question that must be answered is WHY you want to move them to a
    new computer?

    Assuming your are REPLACING an existing computer with a new one, the
    following often works:

    1. Remove hard drive from new computer and install in old computer as #2
    drive.
    2. Use the new hard drive manufacturer's utilities to copy everything from
    existing #1 hard drive to #2 hard drive
    3. Put #2 hard drive back in new computer.
    4. Deal with XP bitching about being in a strange land..
     
  6. John Doue

    John Doue Flightless Bird

    On 4/1/2010 6:59 PM, Ken Blake, MVP wrote:
    > On Thu, 01 Apr 2010 16:06:46 +0300, John Doue<notwobe@yahoo.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> 1/ Run a registry cleaner to get rid of existing issues *after* making a
    >> backup of it and making sure System Restore is activated.

    >
    >
    > Registry cleaning programs are *all* snake oil. Cleaning of the
    > registry isn't needed and is dangerous. Leave the registry alone and
    > don't use any registry cleaner. Despite what many people think, and
    > what vendors of registry cleaning software try to convince you of,
    > having unused registry entries doesn't really hurt you.
    >
    > The risk of a serious problem caused by a registry cleaner erroneously
    > removing an entry you need is far greater than any potential benefit
    > it may have.
    >
    > Read http://www.edbott.com/weblog/archives/000643.html
    >


    Sorry, but you missed the point by a mile. My suggestion has nothing to
    do with "cleaning" or "removing" entries: it has all to do with allowing
    a subsequent detection of what entries become faulty *due to* moving the
    directories and files.

    This cannot be done without prior establishing of a base, whatever its
    merits. And I made sure to provide the useful advices in case the user
    has little experience.
    --
    John Doue
     
  7. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    "John Doue" <notwobe@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:eLMIwwZ0KHA.4168@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > On 4/1/2010 10:36 AM, Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> "setecastronomy" <setecastronomy@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
    >> message news:A2BC5191-42CF-4264-BEEC-E8C43B489312@microsoft.com...
    >>> Here we have some legacy applications for windows whose installing
    >>> media went
    >>> lost. We don't even have any contact with the software houses or
    >>> programmers
    >>> who developed them. We would like to move some of them to new
    >>> computers but
    >>> it can be a nightmare. Searching on the net I learnt there are
    >>> commercial
    >>> software which claim to do that dirty work, but I found no clue on how
    >>> to do
    >>> it manually. In the past I tried to solve a similar scenario using
    >>> sysinternals tools (ProcessMonitor) to understand what files and dlls an
    >>> application needed but I ended up with total failure. Any suggestions ?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Thanks
    >>> Filippo

    >>
    >> With simple applications it is sufficient to copy the application
    >> folders to the new machine and perhaps also some .dll files in case it
    >> complains. With complex applications you would have to replicate each
    >> and every registry entry, which sounds like an impossible task unless
    >> they are all clearly marked as belonging to this particular application.
    >> Your best bet may be to replace the applications with new ones that are
    >> fully supported and for which you implement a formal register to protect
    >> yourself against future loss. Note also that if these are 16-bit
    >> applications, they won't run under new OSs such as Windows 7.

    >
    > One easier -IMHO- option is:
    >
    > 1/ Run a registry cleaner to get rid of existing issues *after* making a
    > backup of it and making sure System Restore is activated.
    >
    > 2/ Create a restore point.
    >
    > 3/ Move (not copy) the directory (ies) to their new location, keeping the
    > same structure.
    >
    > 4/ Run again the registry cleaner and make a careful note of what comes up
    > as new issues.
    >
    > 5/ Go into the registry and do a search and replace to replace the old
    > locations by the new ones.
    >
    > 6/ Run again the registry cleaner to see if you missed some registry keys.
    >
    > 7 / Try running the software.
    >
    > Doing this assumes you are familiar with working on the registry, doing
    > backups, and restores. Sorry if this sounds patronizing.
    >
    > I do not know many tools which can do search and replace in the registry.
    > One of them is Powertools, whose registry cleaner and other applications I
    > find reliable.
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > --
    > John Doue


    Your suggestion expands on the point I had made: That a transfer could be
    feasible if the application had flagged all its registry keys so that they
    would be recognisable. This is a tall order for a human and an much taller
    order for an automated process. My suspicion is that the registry cleaner
    would miss numerous relevant entries and flag numerous irrelevant entries.
    Would you care to test the idea on your machine, e.g. with Acrobat Reader,
    and report the results here?
     
  8. John Doue

    John Doue Flightless Bird

    On 4/1/2010 8:22 PM, Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >
    >
    > "John Doue" <notwobe@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:eLMIwwZ0KHA.4168@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> On 4/1/2010 10:36 AM, Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "setecastronomy" <setecastronomy@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
    >>> message news:A2BC5191-42CF-4264-BEEC-E8C43B489312@microsoft.com...
    >>>> Here we have some legacy applications for windows whose installing
    >>>> media went
    >>>> lost. We don't even have any contact with the software houses or
    >>>> programmers
    >>>> who developed them. We would like to move some of them to new
    >>>> computers but
    >>>> it can be a nightmare. Searching on the net I learnt there are
    >>>> commercial
    >>>> software which claim to do that dirty work, but I found no clue on how
    >>>> to do
    >>>> it manually. In the past I tried to solve a similar scenario using
    >>>> sysinternals tools (ProcessMonitor) to understand what files and
    >>>> dlls an
    >>>> application needed but I ended up with total failure. Any suggestions ?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks
    >>>> Filippo
    >>>
    >>> With simple applications it is sufficient to copy the application
    >>> folders to the new machine and perhaps also some .dll files in case it
    >>> complains. With complex applications you would have to replicate each
    >>> and every registry entry, which sounds like an impossible task unless
    >>> they are all clearly marked as belonging to this particular application.
    >>> Your best bet may be to replace the applications with new ones that are
    >>> fully supported and for which you implement a formal register to protect
    >>> yourself against future loss. Note also that if these are 16-bit
    >>> applications, they won't run under new OSs such as Windows 7.

    >>
    >> One easier -IMHO- option is:
    >>
    >> 1/ Run a registry cleaner to get rid of existing issues *after* making
    >> a backup of it and making sure System Restore is activated.
    >>
    >> 2/ Create a restore point.
    >>
    >> 3/ Move (not copy) the directory (ies) to their new location, keeping
    >> the same structure.
    >>
    >> 4/ Run again the registry cleaner and make a careful note of what
    >> comes up as new issues.
    >>
    >> 5/ Go into the registry and do a search and replace to replace the old
    >> locations by the new ones.
    >>
    >> 6/ Run again the registry cleaner to see if you missed some registry
    >> keys.
    >>
    >> 7 / Try running the software.
    >>
    >> Doing this assumes you are familiar with working on the registry,
    >> doing backups, and restores. Sorry if this sounds patronizing.
    >>
    >> I do not know many tools which can do search and replace in the
    >> registry. One of them is Powertools, whose registry cleaner and other
    >> applications I find reliable.
    >>
    >> Good luck.
    >>
    >> --
    >> John Doue

    >
    > Your suggestion expands on the point I had made: That a transfer could
    > be feasible if the application had flagged all its registry keys so that
    > they would be recognisable. This is a tall order for a human and an much
    > taller order for an automated process. My suspicion is that the registry
    > cleaner would miss numerous relevant entries and flag numerous
    > irrelevant entries. Would you care to test the idea on your machine,
    > e.g. with Acrobat Reader, and report the results here?


    We are talking legacy applications here. I do not think Acrobat Reader
    qualifies. If I took the time to expose this process, it is because I
    have used it previously, even for applications which make extensive
    (very extensive use) of the registry. Like WordPerfect X4. Involved, but
    feasible. Worth trying if you value said application.

    If the application does not make much use of registry keys, it might
    just work after a move, or editing of ini files might be in order.

    Any way, this is worth a try. Of course, suggesting to replace legacy
    applications is less involved: if your car no longer works, just buy a
    new one. Easier.
    --
    John Doue
     
  9. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    John Doue wrote:
    > On 4/1/2010 8:22 PM, Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> "John Doue" <notwobe@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >> news:eLMIwwZ0KHA.4168@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>> On 4/1/2010 10:36 AM, Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "setecastronomy" <setecastronomy@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
    >>>> message news:A2BC5191-42CF-4264-BEEC-E8C43B489312@microsoft.com...
    >>>>> Here we have some legacy applications for windows whose installing
    >>>>> media went
    >>>>> lost. We don't even have any contact with the software houses or
    >>>>> programmers
    >>>>> who developed them. We would like to move some of them to new
    >>>>> computers but
    >>>>> it can be a nightmare. Searching on the net I learnt there are
    >>>>> commercial
    >>>>> software which claim to do that dirty work, but I found no clue on how
    >>>>> to do
    >>>>> it manually. In the past I tried to solve a similar scenario using
    >>>>> sysinternals tools (ProcessMonitor) to understand what files and
    >>>>> dlls an
    >>>>> application needed but I ended up with total failure. Any
    >>>>> suggestions ?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks
    >>>>> Filippo
    >>>>
    >>>> With simple applications it is sufficient to copy the application
    >>>> folders to the new machine and perhaps also some .dll files in case it
    >>>> complains. With complex applications you would have to replicate each
    >>>> and every registry entry, which sounds like an impossible task unless
    >>>> they are all clearly marked as belonging to this particular
    >>>> application.
    >>>> Your best bet may be to replace the applications with new ones that are
    >>>> fully supported and for which you implement a formal register to
    >>>> protect
    >>>> yourself against future loss. Note also that if these are 16-bit
    >>>> applications, they won't run under new OSs such as Windows 7.
    >>>
    >>> One easier -IMHO- option is:
    >>>
    >>> 1/ Run a registry cleaner to get rid of existing issues *after* making
    >>> a backup of it and making sure System Restore is activated.
    >>>
    >>> 2/ Create a restore point.
    >>>
    >>> 3/ Move (not copy) the directory (ies) to their new location, keeping
    >>> the same structure.
    >>>
    >>> 4/ Run again the registry cleaner and make a careful note of what
    >>> comes up as new issues.
    >>>
    >>> 5/ Go into the registry and do a search and replace to replace the old
    >>> locations by the new ones.
    >>>
    >>> 6/ Run again the registry cleaner to see if you missed some registry
    >>> keys.
    >>>
    >>> 7 / Try running the software.
    >>>
    >>> Doing this assumes you are familiar with working on the registry,
    >>> doing backups, and restores. Sorry if this sounds patronizing.
    >>>
    >>> I do not know many tools which can do search and replace in the
    >>> registry. One of them is Powertools, whose registry cleaner and other
    >>> applications I find reliable.
    >>>
    >>> Good luck.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> John Doue

    >>
    >> Your suggestion expands on the point I had made: That a transfer could
    >> be feasible if the application had flagged all its registry keys so that
    >> they would be recognisable. This is a tall order for a human and an much
    >> taller order for an automated process. My suspicion is that the registry
    >> cleaner would miss numerous relevant entries and flag numerous
    >> irrelevant entries. Would you care to test the idea on your machine,
    >> e.g. with Acrobat Reader, and report the results here?

    >
    > We are talking legacy applications here. I do not think Acrobat Reader
    > qualifies. If I took the time to expose this process, it is because I
    > have used it previously, even for applications which make extensive
    > (very extensive use) of the registry. Like WordPerfect X4. Involved, but
    > feasible. Worth trying if you value said application.
    >
    > If the application does not make much use of registry keys, it might
    > just work after a move, or editing of ini files might be in order.
    >
    > Any way, this is worth a try. Of course, suggesting to replace legacy
    > applications is less involved: if your car no longer works, just buy a
    > new one. Easier.


    Although your process has a certain logical appeal, it depends on the
    repeatability of the registry cleaner that is used. Although the cleaner
    you used may well have worked for the applications that you had, I've
    seen more than one report about registry cleaners that find "registry
    errors" on a second pass *after* they have run, found errors, and been
    permitted to "clean" or "repair" those errors.

    As you suggest, it *may* be worth the time and effort to try, but your
    first instruction, to make a backup, is crucial. I'd make a disk image,
    rather than a registry backup. If you manage to corrupt the registry
    sufficiently to prevent Windows from starting, then it probably will be
    easier to restore using an image than using a registry backup utility
    (which likely will require booting into a non-Windows OS).

    [Sometimes it *is* more cost effective to buy a new car rather than
    continuing to make repairs to an old one. But that's another story.]

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
  10. John Doue

    John Doue Flightless Bird

    On 4/1/2010 9:40 PM, Lem wrote:
    > John Doue wrote:
    >> On 4/1/2010 8:22 PM, Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "John Doue" <notwobe@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:eLMIwwZ0KHA.4168@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>>> On 4/1/2010 10:36 AM, Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "setecastronomy" <setecastronomy@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
    >>>>> message news:A2BC5191-42CF-4264-BEEC-E8C43B489312@microsoft.com...
    >>>>>> Here we have some legacy applications for windows whose installing
    >>>>>> media went
    >>>>>> lost. We don't even have any contact with the software houses or
    >>>>>> programmers
    >>>>>> who developed them. We would like to move some of them to new
    >>>>>> computers but
    >>>>>> it can be a nightmare. Searching on the net I learnt there are
    >>>>>> commercial
    >>>>>> software which claim to do that dirty work, but I found no clue on
    >>>>>> how
    >>>>>> to do
    >>>>>> it manually. In the past I tried to solve a similar scenario using
    >>>>>> sysinternals tools (ProcessMonitor) to understand what files and
    >>>>>> dlls an
    >>>>>> application needed but I ended up with total failure. Any
    >>>>>> suggestions ?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thanks
    >>>>>> Filippo
    >>>>>
    >>>>> With simple applications it is sufficient to copy the application
    >>>>> folders to the new machine and perhaps also some .dll files in case it
    >>>>> complains. With complex applications you would have to replicate each
    >>>>> and every registry entry, which sounds like an impossible task unless
    >>>>> they are all clearly marked as belonging to this particular
    >>>>> application.
    >>>>> Your best bet may be to replace the applications with new ones that
    >>>>> are
    >>>>> fully supported and for which you implement a formal register to
    >>>>> protect
    >>>>> yourself against future loss. Note also that if these are 16-bit
    >>>>> applications, they won't run under new OSs such as Windows 7.
    >>>>
    >>>> One easier -IMHO- option is:
    >>>>
    >>>> 1/ Run a registry cleaner to get rid of existing issues *after* making
    >>>> a backup of it and making sure System Restore is activated.
    >>>>
    >>>> 2/ Create a restore point.
    >>>>
    >>>> 3/ Move (not copy) the directory (ies) to their new location, keeping
    >>>> the same structure.
    >>>>
    >>>> 4/ Run again the registry cleaner and make a careful note of what
    >>>> comes up as new issues.
    >>>>
    >>>> 5/ Go into the registry and do a search and replace to replace the old
    >>>> locations by the new ones.
    >>>>
    >>>> 6/ Run again the registry cleaner to see if you missed some registry
    >>>> keys.
    >>>>
    >>>> 7 / Try running the software.
    >>>>
    >>>> Doing this assumes you are familiar with working on the registry,
    >>>> doing backups, and restores. Sorry if this sounds patronizing.
    >>>>
    >>>> I do not know many tools which can do search and replace in the
    >>>> registry. One of them is Powertools, whose registry cleaner and other
    >>>> applications I find reliable.
    >>>>
    >>>> Good luck.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> John Doue
    >>>
    >>> Your suggestion expands on the point I had made: That a transfer could
    >>> be feasible if the application had flagged all its registry keys so that
    >>> they would be recognisable. This is a tall order for a human and an much
    >>> taller order for an automated process. My suspicion is that the registry
    >>> cleaner would miss numerous relevant entries and flag numerous
    >>> irrelevant entries. Would you care to test the idea on your machine,
    >>> e.g. with Acrobat Reader, and report the results here?

    >>
    >> We are talking legacy applications here. I do not think Acrobat Reader
    >> qualifies. If I took the time to expose this process, it is because I
    >> have used it previously, even for applications which make extensive
    >> (very extensive use) of the registry. Like WordPerfect X4. Involved,
    >> but feasible. Worth trying if you value said application.
    >>
    >> If the application does not make much use of registry keys, it might
    >> just work after a move, or editing of ini files might be in order.
    >>
    >> Any way, this is worth a try. Of course, suggesting to replace legacy
    >> applications is less involved: if your car no longer works, just buy a
    >> new one. Easier.

    >
    > Although your process has a certain logical appeal, it depends on the
    > repeatability of the registry cleaner that is used. Although the cleaner
    > you used may well have worked for the applications that you had, I've
    > seen more than one report about registry cleaners that find "registry
    > errors" on a second pass *after* they have run, found errors, and been
    > permitted to "clean" or "repair" those errors.
    >
    > As you suggest, it *may* be worth the time and effort to try, but your
    > first instruction, to make a backup, is crucial. I'd make a disk image,
    > rather than a registry backup. If you manage to corrupt the registry
    > sufficiently to prevent Windows from starting, then it probably will be
    > easier to restore using an image than using a registry backup utility
    > (which likely will require booting into a non-Windows OS).
    >
    > [Sometimes it *is* more cost effective to buy a new car rather than
    > continuing to make repairs to an old one. But that's another story.]
    >

    My idea of a registry backup is a backup which can be restored, if
    needed, out of Windows, otherwise the interest is limited. For that
    purpose, my registry backups (daily) are stored on a partition other
    than C:. Saved my bacon more than once. Just to boot a CD or diskette,
    unpack the zip file, modify as needed the restore batch file to reflect
    the drive Windows is installed on, and there I go.

    The cleaner I suggested (Powertools) is 100% consistent in its results.
    Indeed, I would not trust any such utility without extensive experience
    with it.

    At the end of the day, the idea is to offer solutions to the OP, not to
    attempt to prove your suggestion is the best, or the only one. On the
    other hand, sidestepping the question is not answering it :).

    Indeed, moving to a more modern application is often a wise solution,
    but in some cases, businesses especially, custom critical applications
    were developped and for some reason, not updated to follow Windows
    evolution. So, this is not always a simple option ... even if it remains
    desirable in a longer term perspective.

    --
    John Doue
     

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