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media.legacy[2].txt

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by bobster, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Every time I do a scan with SUPERAntiSpyware on my XP-SP3 system I get the
    following "bad" cookie report:

    media.legacy[2].txt

    I remove it with SAS but it's always back the next time I run SAS. It
    doesn't appear when I run Malwarebytes, MSE or Spybot S&D .

    I can't find out much about it on Google or Bing.

    Does anyone know what it is or if it is dangerous?

    TIA
     
  2. Saucy

    Saucy Flightless Bird

    Cookies per se are not dangerous in and of themselves. They are strings of
    text, therefore basically static or inert and not dangerous. They are placed
    on your machine by the web servers of the websites you visited. This is by
    design.

    They can however be used to uniquely identify the website's visitor (that is
    *you*) and may contain information about you.

    Some anti-spyware will flag cookies that are known to be tracking you. You
    may or may not care that there is tracking going on.

    So with some anti-spyware programs you can set them to ignore cookies.

    Why not just turn off cookies in your browser? This is a solution, but makes
    browsing difficult. Interactive websites might not work without your browser
    setting cookies.

    Another solution is to download a hosts file from the Microsoft Most Valued
    Professional website and place it in the C:/Windows\System32\drivers\etc
    folder (overwriting the blank hosts file already there).

    Here's the link to the website:

    http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/hosts.htm

    and a direct link to the hosts file:

    http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/hosts.txt

    It must be renamed from "hosts.txt" to just "hosts" - no file extension -
    before being placed in the C:/Windows\System32\drivers\etc folder.

    Once done, log off then back on and a whole slew of web tracking servers
    will never reach your browser. Have a look at the content of the hosts.txt
    file to get an idea of the type of domains that place tracking cookies. You
    will not miss them. And because these tracking domains are blocked many of
    those annoying ads you see in websites won't appear.

    Have a nice weekend.



    "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
    news:e#RjQrBrKHA.1800@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > Every time I do a scan with SUPERAntiSpyware on my XP-SP3 system I get the
    > following "bad" cookie report:
    >
    > media.legacy[2].txt
    >
    > I remove it with SAS but it's always back the next time I run SAS. It
    > doesn't appear when I run Malwarebytes, MSE or Spybot S&D .
    >
    > I can't find out much about it on Google or Bing.
    >
    > Does anyone know what it is or if it is dangerous?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >
     
  3. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    bobster wrote:

    > Every time I do a scan with SUPERAntiSpyware on my XP-SP3 system I get the
    > following "bad" cookie report:
    >
    > media.legacy[2].txt
    >
    > I remove it with SAS but it's always back the next time I run SAS. It
    > doesn't appear when I run Malwarebytes, MSE or Spybot S&D .
    >
    > I can't find out much about it on Google or Bing.
    >
    > Does anyone know what it is or if it is dangerous?
    >
    > TIA


    Cookies are NOT malware. They are just text files. Whether they are used
    to track your web navigation depends on the sites that you visit. So don't
    visit whatever sites create this cookie if you don't want it. Since cookies
    are not malware, whether an anti-malware product reports the cookie depends
    either on settings in that security program or if they are trying to bloat
    their perceived effectiveness by reporting on something rather than
    reporting on real problems.

    In SuperAntispyware, disable the option to scan for tracking cookies. All
    cookies despite their content *can* be used for tracking. A tire iron can
    be used to murder, too.

    Any site can create a cookie .txt file. However, only the site whose domain
    matches the one recorded inside the cookie can access the contents of that
    cookie. So domain A could write a cookie for domain B and if you happen to
    visit domain B then it can see the cookie's content which would have stuff
    written in it from domain A.

    So why not configure your web browser to purge all cookies when you exit
    that web browser? You might also want to up the enforcement policy on what
    cookies are allowed on your host. How that's done depends on what web
    browser(s) you use. There are tons of methods to manage cookies.

    You can probably use a text editor to look inside the cookie to see for what
    domain it was written for its access. The domain inside the cookie might
    for the domain you visit that wrote the cookie (but that's not required).
    That would lead you to which site you keep revisiting that creates this
    cookie file. Rather than use a text editor and decipher its content, you
    could use Nirsoft's IE Cookie Viewer (*if* IE is the web browser that you
    use since you didn't mention it).
     
  4. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Thanks, VanguardLH and Saucy for your helpful suggestions. You have both
    eased my mind on the dangers of tracking cookies.

    I found the option to "scan for tracking cookies" under Scanning Control in
    SUPRERAntiSpyware preferences and have unchecked it.

    ====================================================================
    "VanguardLH" <V@nguard.LH> wrote in message
    news:hl4vo6$1tn$1@news.albasani.net...
    bobster wrote:

    > Every time I do a scan with SUPERAntiSpyware on my XP-SP3 system I get the
    > following "bad" cookie report:
    >
    > media.legacy[2].txt
    >
    > I remove it with SAS but it's always back the next time I run SAS. It
    > doesn't appear when I run Malwarebytes, MSE or Spybot S&D .
    >
    > I can't find out much about it on Google or Bing.
    >
    > Does anyone know what it is or if it is dangerous?
    >
    > TIA


    Cookies are NOT malware. They are just text files. Whether they are used
    to track your web navigation depends on the sites that you visit. So don't
    visit whatever sites create this cookie if you don't want it. Since cookies
    are not malware, whether an anti-malware product reports the cookie depends
    either on settings in that security program or if they are trying to bloat
    their perceived effectiveness by reporting on something rather than
    reporting on real problems.

    In SuperAntispyware, disable the option to scan for tracking cookies. All
    cookies despite their content *can* be used for tracking. A tire iron can
    be used to murder, too.

    Any site can create a cookie .txt file. However, only the site whose domain
    matches the one recorded inside the cookie can access the contents of that
    cookie. So domain A could write a cookie for domain B and if you happen to
    visit domain B then it can see the cookie's content which would have stuff
    written in it from domain A.

    So why not configure your web browser to purge all cookies when you exit
    that web browser? You might also want to up the enforcement policy on what
    cookies are allowed on your host. How that's done depends on what web
    browser(s) you use. There are tons of methods to manage cookies.

    You can probably use a text editor to look inside the cookie to see for what
    domain it was written for its access. The domain inside the cookie might
    for the domain you visit that wrote the cookie (but that's not required).
    That would lead you to which site you keep revisiting that creates this
    cookie file. Rather than use a text editor and decipher its content, you
    could use Nirsoft's IE Cookie Viewer (*if* IE is the web browser that you
    use since you didn't mention it).
     
  5. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    bobster wrote:

    > Thanks, VanguardLH and Saucy for your helpful suggestions. You have both
    > eased my mind on the dangers of tracking cookies.
    >
    > I found the option to "scan for tracking cookies" under Scanning Control in
    > SUPRERAntiSpyware preferences and have unchecked it.


    Cookies only allow a small amount of storage on your host: typically 300
    cookies total, 20 cookies per domain, 4096 bytes per cookie. These are the
    recommended minimums [but are *not* required] by RFC 2109. IE goes its own
    way with a maximum cookie count of 20 (but got upped to 50) with a total of
    4096 bytes maximum consumed by all cookies (upped to 10KB in IE8); see (see
    http://blogs.msdn.com/ieinternals/archive/2009/08/20/WinINET-IE-Cookie-Internals-FAQ.aspx.
    You'll have to do your own research regarding maximums in other web
    browsers. Some web servers also have their own maximums. Apache will fail
    with "Size of a request header field exceeds server limit" if the total of
    all cookies retrieved by the Cookie: request header exceeds 8190 bytes.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Http_cookie

    Another source of cookies are with Flash which has its own .sol files. You
    can manage how big they can become or if any are saved on your host at all.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flash_cookie

    Cookies are not the only means of saving site data (euphemistically called
    "user data" for a site) on your host. User persistent data is a separate
    cache and allows far more storage of site data on your host. Check if you
    have the following options enabled:

    Internet Options

    - Advanced tab
    Security section
    Enable DOM Storage

    - Security tab
    <pick a security zone, like Internet>
    Custom Level
    Miscellaneous section
    Userdata persistence

    See:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc197062(VS.85).aspx
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOM_storage
    https://developer.mozilla.org/En/DOM:Storage#Description

    DOM storage is new as of IE8 (http://dev.w3.org/html5/webstorage/). As I
    recall, the persistent data is stored under the %userprofile%\UserData
    folder for IE. Other web browsers have their own DOM storage location
    (e.g., Firefox uses an SQLlite file). I've had these options disabled for
    so long and probably did cleanup at the time that there is nothing to find
    on my host under this folder. There may be freeware that not only purges
    the classic .txt cookies (and possibly the Flash .sol cookies) but also the
    UserData records.
     

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