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is Outlook free on new Win7 machines

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by MikeS, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. MikeS

    MikeS Flightless Bird

    A friend of mine has a dying XP machine and he's considering what to
    buy. If he buys a new Win7 box will Outlook come with it, or will he
    have to purchase Office to get it?
     
  2. Bruce Hagen

    Bruce Hagen Flightless Bird

    "MikeS" <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:hvla81$vcv$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >A friend of mine has a dying XP machine and he's considering what to buy.
    >If he buys a new Win7 box will Outlook come with it, or will he have to
    >purchase Office to get it?



    He will have to purchase Office. Office/Outlook has never been included in
    any Windows version. If he has the CD for Office 2003 or later, that is
    compatible with Win7.
    --
    Bruce Hagen
    MS-MVP [Mail]
    Imperial Beach, CA
     
  3. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 07:57:05 -0700, MikeS <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > A friend of mine has a dying XP machine and he's considering what to
    > buy. If he buys a new Win7 box will Outlook come with it, or will he
    > have to purchase Office to get it?



    Several points:

    1. In my view, he certainly should get Windows 7. It makes no sense to
    get an old obsolescent version of Windows.

    2. Outlook does not come with Windows 7, not has it ever come with
    *any* version of Windows (although Outlook Express, a very different
    program, came with Windows XP).

    3. Microsoft Office *may* come, not with Windows, but with the
    computer, as something that the manufacturer bundles with the computer
    he sells. However, be aware that most copies of Office that come with
    computers these days are just trial versions, so if your friend gets
    such a machine, he should make sure he knows whether what he's getting
    is just a trial version.

    4. If he wants Outlook, he can buy it, either by itself or as part of
    Microsoft Office.

    5. Windows 7 comes with *no* e-mail or newsgroup program. Although
    many people object to this, I think it's a step in the right
    direction, since it leaves everyone more free to choose whatever
    program(s) he likes best. There are many choices available, both from
    Microsoft and from third-parties. Some are free and some are for sale.
    Microsoft has Windows Live Mail (which is essentially also a newer
    version of Outlook Express/Windows Mail, with still another new name)
    available for download for free and Outlook (a different program from
    outlook express) available for sale, either alone or as part of
    Microsoft Office.

    Some people will tell you to use Windows Live Mail; others will tell
    you to use Thunderbird; still others may have other recommendations.
    My advice is to ignore all such recommendations. I personally use
    Microsoft Outlook for e-mail and Forté Agent for newsgroups, but you
    should try several and choose what *you* like best, rather than make
    your decision based on what I, or anyone else, likes best (or even
    what Microsoft suggests).


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     
  4. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    Ken Blake wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 07:57:05 -0700, MikeS <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote:


    <snipped>

    > 5. Windows 7 comes with *no* e-mail or newsgroup program. Although
    > many people object to this, I think it's a step in the right
    > direction, since it leaves everyone more free to choose whatever
    > program(s) he likes best.


    That's bull. People have ALWAYS been able to choose the mail client they
    like best. My choice was always Outlook Express, and that choice has now
    been taken from me.

    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003


    --
    Crash

    Committed to the search for intraterrestrial intelligence.
     
  5. Bruce Hagen

    Bruce Hagen Flightless Bird

    "Dave "Crash" Dummy" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:iorTn.83568$HG1.59108@newsfe21.iad...


    > That's bull. People have ALWAYS been able to choose the mail client they
    > like best. My choice was always Outlook Express, and that choice has now
    > been taken from me.
    > --
    > Crash
    >
    > Committed to the search for intraterrestrial intelligence.



    There are many people that liked OE, including myself. But the problem is
    that all production of Outlook Express ended in June 2006.
    --
    Bruce Hagen
    MS-MVP [Mail]
    Imperial Beach, CA
     
  6. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    On 06/20/2010 06:32 PM, Dave "Crash" Dummy wrote:
    > Ken Blake wrote:
    >> On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 07:57:05 -0700, MikeS <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    > <snipped>
    >
    >> 5. Windows 7 comes with *no* e-mail or newsgroup program. Although
    >> many people object to this, I think it's a step in the right
    >> direction, since it leaves everyone more free to choose whatever
    >> program(s) he likes best.

    >
    > That's bull. People have ALWAYS been able to choose the mail client they
    > like best. My choice was always Outlook Express, and that choice has now
    > been taken from me.


    It doesn't have spell check, junk filters and can explode if the message
    store gets too big. Backing it up is a pain and so is restoring it. It's
    nick name is Outhouse Distress. The only thing good about it is the
    multiple sig feature. You can, however, choose OE if you run Win 7 Pro
    or Ultimate with the virtual XP trip so it really hasn't been taken away
    from you.


    --
    Alias
     
  7. bettablue

    bettablue Flightless Bird

    "MikeS" <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:hvla81$vcv$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > A friend of mine has a dying XP machine and he's considering what to buy.
    > If he buys a new Win7 box will Outlook come with it, or will he have to
    > purchase Office to get it?


    Ken is correct. And, to add my own comments, I would definitely go with
    Windows 7. As good as XP was/is, Windows 7 is so much better; especially
    for networking. Now to answer your question, Outlook does not come as part
    of any version of Windows unless it was included as part of the
    manufacturers software bundle. If a computer does come with Outlook, or MS
    Office, it is usually a trial version that will either give you limited
    functionality, or it will time out so you only have a set amount of time,
    usually 30 or 90 days.

    I personally use Windows Live Mail for my mail and Usenet needs at home,
    even though I also have Microsoft Office 2003 and will be upgrading to 2010
    shortly. At work, I use Outlook. Windows Live Mail works best for me at
    home because it supports Usenet by default and I have no need for Usenet at
    my office. Why Outlook doesn't support Usenet has been a question I have
    asked Microsoft numerous times. Although Outlook does not natively support
    Usenet, there are several third party programs/plug-ins that will allow you
    to add Usenet functionality, for a cost starting at something like $69.95.
    Another thing to consider, Microsoft is ending their support of their Usenet
    groups, and because of that, many cable companies are following suit and
    ending their own Usenet access. Cox is following suit and ending their
    Usenet access this month forcing their customers to find alternatives.

    Now to get back on topic, Windows Live Mail has functionality that previous
    versions of Outlook Express and Windows Mail have either had and later
    removed, or have never supported. One of these is the ability to add mail
    accounts from web based mail such as Hotmail and Gmail. WLM also allows for
    adding other Usenet accounts as well, like eternal-september.org and
    AIOE.org. Neither of these can be added into Outlook without the for
    mentioned third party program/plug-in.
     
  8. Gordon

    Gordon Flightless Bird

    "Dave "Crash" Dummy" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:iorTn.83568$HG1.59108@newsfe21.iad...
    > Ken Blake wrote:
    >> On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 07:57:05 -0700, MikeS <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    > <snipped>
    >
    >> 5. Windows 7 comes with *no* e-mail or newsgroup program. Although many
    >> people object to this, I think it's a step in the right direction, since
    >> it leaves everyone more free to choose whatever program(s) he likes best.

    >
    > That's bull. People have ALWAYS been able to choose the mail client they
    > like best.


    Bull yourself. What do the MAJORITY do? "Choose" what's dished up to them on
    a plate.
     
  9. Gordon

    Gordon Flightless Bird

    "bettablue" <bettablue@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:hvliso$71l$1@news.eternal-september.org...

    > Why Outlook doesn't support Usenet has been a question I have asked
    > Microsoft numerous times.


    Because by far and away the VAST majority of Outlook installations are in a
    corporate environment where usenet is either not required or is specifically
    banned....and in an Exchange environment if access IS required to some
    newsgroups for technical matters then Exchange can be configured to use
    Public Folders as newsgroups. Thus there has been no incentive for MS to add
    usenet capability to Outlook..
     
  10. Death

    Death Flightless Bird

    "Alias" <aka@hewhoismasked&anonymous.com> wrote in message
    news:hvlipi$6qp$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > On 06/20/2010 06:32 PM, Dave "Crash" Dummy wrote:
    >> Ken Blake wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 07:57:05 -0700, MikeS <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >>
    >> <snipped>
    >>
    >>> 5. Windows 7 comes with *no* e-mail or newsgroup program. Although
    >>> many people object to this, I think it's a step in the right
    >>> direction, since it leaves everyone more free to choose whatever
    >>> program(s) he likes best.

    >>
    >> That's bull. People have ALWAYS been able to choose the mail client they
    >> like best. My choice was always Outlook Express, and that choice has now
    >> been taken from me.

    >
    > It doesn't have spell check, junk filters and can explode if the message
    > store gets too big. Backing it up is a pain and so is restoring it. It's
    > nick name is Outhouse Distress. The only thing good about it is the
    > multiple sig feature. You can, however, choose OE if you run Win 7 Pro or
    > Ultimate with the virtual XP trip so it really hasn't been taken away from
    > you.
    >
    >


    Aiyeeee ... its gonna explode.
    Mine has got spelll chek enabled.

    --
    Vita brevis breviter in brevi finietur,
    Mors venit velociter quae neminem veretur.
     
  11. Nil

    Nil Flightless Bird

    On 20 Jun 2010, "bettablue" <bettablue@hotmail.com> wrote in
    alt.windows7.general:

    > Another thing to consider, Microsoft is ending their support of
    > their Usenet groups, and because of that, many cable companies are
    > following suit and ending their own Usenet access. Cox is
    > following suit and ending their Usenet access this month forcing
    > their customers to find alternatives.


    You've got that kind of backward. ISPs dropping their own usenet
    service has been going on for the past few years, long before
    Microsoft decided to end their service. If Cox is ending their
    service now, it's a coincidence that has nothing to do with
    Microsoft's decision.
     
  12. Agent_C

    Agent_C Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 07:57:05 -0700, MikeS <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >A friend of mine has a dying XP machine and he's considering what to
    >buy. If he buys a new Win7 box will Outlook come with it, or will he
    >have to purchase Office to get it?


    If you're referring to Outlook [Express]; essentially yes, it's still
    free, but it's now called Windows Live Mail.

    It doesn't come packaged with W7, it's a separate free download.

    http://explore.live.com/windows-live-mail

    A_C
     
  13. Bob

    Bob Flightless Bird

    Win7 does not come with MS Office.


    The Open source (free) office suite www.openoffice.org does not include an
    integrated email client, but otherwise it will do practically everything MS
    Office does.



    "MikeS" <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:hvla81$vcv$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >A friend of mine has a dying XP machine and he's considering what to buy.
    >If he buys a new Win7 box will Outlook come with it, or will he have to
    >purchase Office to get it?
     
  14. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 12:32:26 -0400, "Dave \"Crash\" Dummy"
    <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:

    > Ken Blake wrote:
    > > On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 07:57:05 -0700, MikeS <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    > <snipped>
    >
    > > 5. Windows 7 comes with *no* e-mail or newsgroup program. Although
    > > many people object to this, I think it's a step in the right
    > > direction, since it leaves everyone more free to choose whatever
    > > program(s) he likes best.

    >
    > That's bull.



    You are always free to disagree with anything I say, but as far as I'm
    concerned, you are not free to do it insultingly with a phrase like
    that. I won't killfile you yet, but if that continues, I will.


    > People have ALWAYS been able to choose the mail client they
    > like best.




    Absolutely. And I didn't say otherwise. Note that I said "it leaves
    everyone *more* free." My point was although there was always freedom,
    only few people exercised that freedom when an e-mail program came
    with Windows. Without any included program, everyone is forced to make
    a choice, and that is *more* freedom.


    > My choice was always Outlook Express, and that choice has now
    > been taken from me.




    That has nothing to do with Windows 7. Outlook Express has been gone
    since Windows Vista.

    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     
  15. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 10:24:33 -0700, "bettablue"
    <bettablue@hotmail.com> wrote:


    > Another thing to consider, Microsoft is ending their support of their Usenet
    > groups, and because of that, many cable companies are following suit and
    > ending their own Usenet access. Cox is following suit and ending their
    > Usenet access this month forcing their customers to find alternatives.



    What cable companies (and other ISPs) have been doing really has
    nothing to do with Microsoft's dropping their news servers. Note the
    following three points:

    1. The ISPs are not really "following suit." Many ISPs dropped their
    news servers *way* before Microsoft did.

    2. There are over 100,000 newsgroups out there. The Microsoft
    newsgroups were only a very small percentage of what was available.

    3. With regard to the Microsoft newsgroups, because they have always
    been echoed to thousands of other news servers all over the world,
    what Microsoft does really doesn't mean that they cease to exist. And
    if the many ISPs that have had news servers still had them, they would
    be helping to keep those Microsoft newsgroups alive.


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     
  16. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 10:24:33 -0700, "bettablue"
    <bettablue@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Why Outlook doesn't support Usenet has been a question I have
    > asked Microsoft numerous times.



    In my view there's no reason why it should. An E-mail client is one
    kind of application and a newsreader is another. Although there have
    been, and still are, many programs that do both, there's no reason why
    they should be packaged together.

    In fact, I think separate programs are better, since it leaves us more
    free to make the choice that suits us better for an e-mail client and
    a different choice that also suits us better for a newsreader. So I
    like Outlook for e-mail, but FortÊ Agent for a newsreader; even though
    Agent can also do e-mail, I don't use it for that, because I prefer
    Outlook for that purpose.

    I feel similarly about suites, and almost always avoid them. I want to
    make an individual choice concerning each type of program that a suite
    may contain. As I single example, I like Corel WordPerfect better than
    Microsoft Word, but Microsoft Excel better than Corel Quattro
    Professional.

    Please note in all the above that I am not trying to convince anyone
    that my preferences (Outlook, Agent, WordPerfect, Excel, etc.) are
    what they should choose. I am only pointing out that having the
    ability to choose which product is best for you is valuable, so any
    kind of package of applications, such as a suite, is usually good to
    stay away from.

    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     
  17. milt

    milt Flightless Bird

    On 6/20/2010 12:24 PM, bettablue wrote:
    > Another thing to consider, Microsoft is ending their support of their Usenet
    > groups, and because of that, many cable companies are following suit and
    > ending their own Usenet access. Cox is following suit and ending their
    > Usenet access this month forcing their customers to find alternatives.
    >


    Actually, MS discontinuing their usenet server has nothing to do with
    cable companies dropping usenet access. They have been doing that for a
    couple of years now, decreasing the service you get but still charging
    you the same price, yet another way cable companies are ripping people
    off, less service for the same price and sometimes they RAISE the price!
    How is that any good for the consumer? Getting less for more...

    Honestly, its all a way to cut costs and make more money while bending
    the consumer over. As for why MS is doing it, most of their users these
    days think the Internet IS the web! It's very sad.
     
  18. SC Tom

    SC Tom Flightless Bird

    "Agent_C" <agent-c-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:6qms1613nvjkspk1u6i4p3givttso08ge0@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 07:57:05 -0700, MikeS <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >>A friend of mine has a dying XP machine and he's considering what to
    >>buy. If he buys a new Win7 box will Outlook come with it, or will he
    >>have to purchase Office to get it?

    >
    > If you're referring to Outlook [Express]; essentially yes, it's still
    > free, but it's now called Windows Live Mail.
    >
    > It doesn't come packaged with W7, it's a separate free download.
    >
    > http://explore.live.com/windows-live-mail
    >
    > A_C
    >

    Windows Live Mail is not Outlook Express renamed. Even though the look is
    similar, it's an entirely different program.
    --
    SC Tom
     
  19. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 17:10:57 -0400, "SC Tom" <sc@tom.net> wrote:


    > "Agent_C" <agent-c-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote in message
    > news:6qms1613nvjkspk1u6i4p3givttso08ge0@4ax.com...
    > > On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 07:57:05 -0700, MikeS <mscir@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >>A friend of mine has a dying XP machine and he's considering what to
    > >>buy. If he buys a new Win7 box will Outlook come with it, or will he
    > >>have to purchase Office to get it?

    > >
    > > If you're referring to Outlook [Express]; essentially yes, it's still
    > > free, but it's now called Windows Live Mail.
    > >
    > > It doesn't come packaged with W7, it's a separate free download.
    > >
    > > http://explore.live.com/windows-live-mail
    > >
    > > A_C
    > >

    > Windows Live Mail is not Outlook Express renamed. Even though the look is
    > similar, it's an entirely different program.




    In one sense, you are right of course. But in another sense, it's not
    *renamed* Outlook Express, but it is a later version of Outlook
    Express. Windows Mail was a later version, and now Windows Live Mail
    is a still later version.

    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     
  20. Agent_C

    Agent_C Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 17:10:57 -0400, "SC Tom" <sc@tom.net> wrote:

    >Windows Live Mail is not Outlook Express renamed. Even though the look is
    >similar, it's an entirely different program.


    It really doesn't matter... At the end of the day the question is
    simply whether Windows still comes with a free email client or not.

    A_C
     

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