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How to Request Login over a peer network?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Davy, May 13, 2010.

  1. Davy

    Davy Flightless Bird

    I have two Windows XP professional computers on a microsoft peer network.

    If I access the network from a laptop whilst logged on to a user which
    doesn't exist on the PCs then I get a different result:
    - one PC asks me to logon
    - the other shows the folders on the shared drives but does not allow
    access to those folders

    I would like to change the second PC to request a logon. Anybody know how
    to do this?

    thanks DAvy
     
  2. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    "Davy" <me@removeallthistextchobham.org.uk> wrote in message
    news:Xns9D77B5D3BA014meremoveallthistextc@216.196.109.145...
    > I have two Windows XP professional computers on a microsoft peer network.
    >
    > If I access the network from a laptop whilst logged on to a user which
    > doesn't exist on the PCs then I get a different result:
    > - one PC asks me to logon
    > - the other shows the folders on the shared drives but does not allow
    > access to those folders
    >
    > I would like to change the second PC to request a logon. Anybody know how
    > to do this?
    >
    > thanks DAvy


    Either the parent folder permissions are different or else the share
    permissions are different. I suspect it's the parent folder permissions.
    Examine both on each host machine, then align them.
     
  3. John Wunderlich

    John Wunderlich Flightless Bird

    "Pegasus [MVP]" <news@microsoft.com> wrote in
    news:#e7nG3r8KHA.420@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl:

    >
    >
    > "Davy" <me@removeallthistextchobham.org.uk> wrote in message
    > news:Xns9D77B5D3BA014meremoveallthistextc@216.196.109.145...
    >> I have two Windows XP professional computers on a microsoft peer
    >> network.
    >>
    >> If I access the network from a laptop whilst logged on to a user
    >> which doesn't exist on the PCs then I get a different result:
    >> - one PC asks me to logon
    >> - the other shows the folders on the shared drives but does not
    >> allow access to those folders
    >>
    >> I would like to change the second PC to request a logon. Anybody
    >> know how to do this?
    >>
    >> thanks DAvy

    >
    > Either the parent folder permissions are different or else the
    > share permissions are different. I suspect it's the parent folder
    > permissions. Examine both on each host machine, then align them.
    >
    >


    One other possibility:

    One of the XP Pro machines has "Simple File Sharing" enabled while
    the other doesn't. When Simple File Sharing is enabled, all incoming
    access to files is forced through the "Guest" user. When Simple File
    Sharing is disabled, individual user authentication takes place with
    a possible difference in access permissions.

    "How to disable simple file sharing and how to set permissions on a
    shared folder in Windows XP"
    <http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307874>

    HTH,
    John
     
  4. Davy

    Davy Flightless Bird

    John,
    I thought that you had hit on it but I examined folder options/view and
    both machines have 'simple file sharing' unchecked.

    thanks though

    Davy

    > One other possibility:
    >
    > One of the XP Pro machines has "Simple File Sharing" enabled while
    > the other doesn't. When Simple File Sharing is enabled, all incoming
    > access to files is forced through the "Guest" user. When Simple File
    > Sharing is disabled, individual user authentication takes place with
    > a possible difference in access permissions.
    >
    > "How to disable simple file sharing and how to set permissions on a
    > shared folder in Windows XP"
    > <http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307874>
    >
    > HTH,
    > John
    >
    >
     
  5. John Wunderlich

    John Wunderlich Flightless Bird

    Davy <me@removeallthistextchobham.org.uk> wrote in
    news:Xns9D785F5E6DE5meremoveallthistextc@216.196.109.145:

    > John,
    > I thought that you had hit on it but I examined folder
    > options/view and both machines have 'simple file sharing'
    > unchecked.
    >
    > thanks though
    >
    > Davy
    >



    OK. I had another thought.

    The normal condition would be to ask for user/password.

    So. Is it possible that you are already somehow connected to the
    machine that does not ask for authentication? Perhaps a drive mapping
    that reconnects on startup? Try this -- Before attempting to connect
    to the machine that doesn't prompt for user/password, bring up a
    command window on your laptop (start->run->"cmd") and enter the
    command:
    net use
    Examine the result and verify that the computer you are trying to
    connect to does _not_ show up anywhere on the resulting list. Windows
    will only allow one authentication per connected machine, so if you are
    already authenticated somehow, it will not ask for user/password.

    If it does show up in the list, disconnect either from command line:
    net use \\computer\share /delete
    or right-click "My Network Places" -> Disconnect Network Drive...
    (even if it is not mapped as a network drive)

    Also, double-check that your laptop username does not exist on the
    remote computer by bringing up a command prompt on the remote computer
    and entering the command:
    net user


    HTH,
    John
     
  6. Davy

    Davy Flightless Bird

    John,
    good thoughts again but .......

    John Wunderlich <jwunderlich@lycos.com> wrote in
    news:Xns9D7882B7D6041wunderpsdrscray@138.125.254.103:

    >
    > So. Is it possible that you are already somehow connected to the
    > machine that does not ask for authentication? Perhaps a drive mapping
    > that reconnects on startup? Try this -- Before attempting to connect
    > to the machine that doesn't prompt for user/password, bring up a
    > command window on your laptop (start->run->"cmd") and enter the
    > command:
    > net use
    > Examine the result and verify that the computer you are trying to
    > connect to does _not_ show up anywhere on the resulting list.



    Net Use does not show the computer that asks for a loggin; but has lots
    of entries for the PC that does not


    > Windows will only allow one authentication per connected machine, so if

    you are
    > already authenticated somehow, it will not ask for user/password.
    >
    > If it does show up in the list, disconnect either from command line:
    > net use \\computer\share /delete
    > or right-click "My Network Places" -> Disconnect Network Drive...
    > (even if it is not mapped as a network drive)


    I disconnected all the network drives in "My Network Places". Net Use
    then shows no network connections. But if I go to Windows Explorer/My
    Network Places/Entire Network/Microsoft Windows Network/Workgroup/PCname
    then all the network places still show up. If I click on one then I get a
    message 'access denied' but no invitation to login. This persists even if
    I log off and on again. Very strange!

    > Also, double-check that your laptop username does not exist on the
    > remote computer by bringing up a command prompt on the remote computer
    > and entering the command:
    > net user


    Net User shows it doesn't exist on the remote machine.

    cheers

    David
     
  7. Davy

    Davy Flightless Bird

    John,
    a little more testing shows that the differing behaviour between the two
    remote machine also works in reverse, i.e. the remote machine that requests
    a login is in turn asked for a login when it tries to access the local
    machine. And the remote machine that doesn't request a login does not get
    asked to login when accessing the local machine.

    Hope that made some sense.

    DAvy
     
  8. John Wunderlich

    John Wunderlich Flightless Bird

    Davy <me@removeallthistextchobham.org.uk> wrote in
    news:Xns9D79B71488EDmeremoveallthistextc@216.196.109.145:

    > John,
    > good thoughts again but .......
    >
    > John Wunderlich <jwunderlich@lycos.com> wrote in
    > news:Xns9D7882B7D6041wunderpsdrscray@138.125.254.103:
    >
    >>
    >> So. Is it possible that you are already somehow connected to the
    >> machine that does not ask for authentication? Perhaps a drive
    >> mapping that reconnects on startup? Try this -- Before
    >> attempting to connect to the machine that doesn't prompt for
    >> user/password, bring up a command window on your laptop
    >> (start->run->"cmd") and enter the command:
    >> net use
    >> Examine the result and verify that the computer you are trying to
    >> connect to does _not_ show up anywhere on the resulting list.

    >
    > Net Use does not show the computer that asks for a loggin; but has
    > lots of entries for the PC that does not


    Now we're getting somewhere. This is the reason that the one computer
    does not ask for login credentials. It is because you already have
    established a connections to that computer.

    >> Windows will only allow one authentication per connected machine,
    >> so if you are already authenticated somehow, it will not ask for
    >> user/password.
    >>
    >> If it does show up in the list, disconnect either from command
    >> line: net use \\computer\share /delete
    >> or right-click "My Network Places" -> Disconnect Network Drive...
    >> (even if it is not mapped as a network drive)

    >
    > I disconnected all the network drives in "My Network Places". Net
    > Use then shows no network connections. But if I go to Windows
    > Explorer/My Network Places/Entire Network/Microsoft Windows
    > Network/Workgroup/PCname then all the network places still show
    > up. If I click on one then I get a message 'access denied' but no
    > invitation to login. This persists even if I log off and on again.
    > Very strange!


    It may be that you have stored username/passwords for that one
    computer recorded under your login. These are stored by logged-in
    user name so one test would be to create a brand new user on your
    laptop, log in as that user and see if things are different.

    Also, try the following article and see if it helps:

    "How To Manage Stored User Names and Passwords on a Computer That Is
    Not in a Domain in Windows XP"
    <http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306541>

    HTH,
    John
     
  9. John Wunderlich

    John Wunderlich Flightless Bird

    Davy <me@removeallthistextchobham.org.uk> wrote in
    news:Xns9D79B71488EDmeremoveallthistextc@216.196.109.145:

    > I disconnected all the network drives in "My Network Places". Net
    > Use then shows no network connections. But if I go to Windows
    > Explorer/My Network Places/Entire Network/Microsoft Windows
    > Network/Workgroup/PCname then all the network places still show
    > up. If I click on one then I get a message 'access denied' but no
    > invitation to login. This persists even if I log off and on again.
    > Very strange!
    >


    One other thing to try.
    After clearing all your connections to that machine, bring up a
    command window and enter the command:

    net use * \\computer\share /user:computer\username

    where "computer" is replaced by the name of the computer you are
    trying to connect to (2 places), and "share" is replaced with a
    sharename on that computer. "username" is replaced with the username
    on that computer that you want to authenticate to. The rest is typed
    as shown. Keep the slashes (/) and back-slashes (\) straight. If it
    works, it will ask you for the password of that user before
    connecting. If there is a problem, the command line approach usually
    provides a more usable error message.

    HTH,
    John
     
  10. Davy

    Davy Flightless Bird

    John

    sorry for the delay in getting back but have been away.

    John Wunderlich <jwunderlich@lycos.com> wrote in
    news:Xns9D7972E08AE8Fwunderpsdrscray@207.46.248.16:

    > Now we're getting somewhere. This is the reason that the one computer
    > does not ask for login credentials. It is because you already have
    > established a connections to that computer.
    >
    > It may be that you have stored username/passwords for that one
    > computer recorded under your login. These are stored by logged-in
    > user name so one test would be to create a brand new user on your
    > laptop, log in as that user and see if things are different.
    >

    I created a new user (which does not exist on the other two machines)on the
    laptop. Was surprised to see in Windows Explorer/network/MS network/ listed
    all the folders that had been accessed by an authenticated user on the
    laptop! When clicking on the folder I get an access violation message.
    Nevertheless, seems to be some kind of privacy breach cos can see what
    another user has been accessing.

    I think its time to give up!

    DAvy
     

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