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How To Relate IDE Controller To Physical Drive?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by (PeteCresswell), Sep 6, 2010.

  1. (PeteCresswell)

    (PeteCresswell) Flightless Bird

    I am troubleshooting an excessive CPU usage problem - almost
    totally unencumbered by any real knowledge.

    Thanks to Process Explorer (thinks again to Cheng and Tim) I have
    discovered that Interrupts are going out of sight - as in 50%
    CPU.

    Googling around, I see that a common source of this is Windows
    automatically downgrading a drive from DMA access to PIO because
    of too many errors from the drive.

    I've got six SATA ('data') drives and one IDE ('system') drive.

    I pulled the DVD drive and the Brand-X SATA card it was attached
    to and I pulled the video card so that I *think* all that's left
    are the SATA drives and IDE drive.

    When I go into Device Manager, I see:

    Primary IDE Channel #1 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    Device 1 = "Not Applicable"

    Primary IDE Channel #2 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    Device 1 = Ultra DMA Mode 5

    Primary IDE Channel #3 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 6
    Device 1 = "Not Applicable"

    Secondary IDE Channel #1 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    Device 1 = "Not Applicable"

    Secondary IDE Channel #2 in list: Device 0 = PIO Mode <========
    Device 1 = Ultra DMA Mode 5

    Secondary IDE Channel #3 in list: Device 0 = "Not Applicable"
    Device 1 = "Not Applicable"

    Looking at the mobo (Asus P5Q SE2), it looks to me like there is
    only one IDE connector.

    Since I have only a single IDE drive, does the above info
    implicate it with no doubt?

    Or could some aspect of the SATA setup be masquerading as a
    "Secondary IDE Channel"?
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  2. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > I am troubleshooting an excessive CPU usage problem - almost
    > totally unencumbered by any real knowledge.
    >
    > Thanks to Process Explorer (thinks again to Cheng and Tim) I have
    > discovered that Interrupts are going out of sight - as in 50%
    > CPU.
    >
    > Googling around, I see that a common source of this is Windows
    > automatically downgrading a drive from DMA access to PIO because
    > of too many errors from the drive.
    >
    > I've got six SATA ('data') drives and one IDE ('system') drive.
    >
    > I pulled the DVD drive and the Brand-X SATA card it was attached
    > to and I pulled the video card so that I *think* all that's left
    > are the SATA drives and IDE drive.
    >
    > When I go into Device Manager, I see:
    >
    > Primary IDE Channel #1 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    > Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >
    > Primary IDE Channel #2 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    > Device 1 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    >
    > Primary IDE Channel #3 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 6
    > Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >
    > Secondary IDE Channel #1 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    > Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >
    > Secondary IDE Channel #2 in list: Device 0 = PIO Mode <========
    > Device 1 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    >
    > Secondary IDE Channel #3 in list: Device 0 = "Not Applicable"
    > Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >
    > Looking at the mobo (Asus P5Q SE2), it looks to me like there is
    > only one IDE connector.
    >
    > Since I have only a single IDE drive, does the above info
    > implicate it with no doubt?
    >
    > Or could some aspect of the SATA setup be masquerading as a
    > "Secondary IDE Channel"?


    Try the following in Device Manager.

    Right now, I'm on an ICH9R motherboard, with six SATA ports
    on the Southbridge, plus a Jmicron chip controlling a single IDE cable.
    In IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers, I can see

    Intel ICH9 Family 2 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 2 - 2926
    Intel ICH9R/DO/DH 4 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 1 - 2920
    Primary IDE Channel
    Primary IDE Channel
    Primary IDE Channel
    Secondary IDE Channel
    Secondary IDE Channel
    Secondary IDE Channel
    Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller

    Now, if I do properties on each, and look at the Details:Hardware Ids, I see

    Intel ICH9 Family 2 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 2 - 2926 8086-2926
    Intel ICH9R/DO/DH 4 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 1 - 2920 8086-2920
    Primary IDE Channel Intel 2926
    Primary IDE Channel Intel 2920
    Primary IDE Channel 197b-2368
    Secondary IDE Channel Intel 2926
    Secondary IDE Channel Intel 2920
    Secondary IDE Channel 197b-2368
    Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller 197b-2368

    Rearranging this into groups, I would get a 4 port SATA controller (with only
    two ports listed), a 2 port SATA controller, and a 2 drive IDE controller.

    Intel ICH9R/DO/DH 4 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 1 - 2920 8086-2920
    Primary IDE Channel Intel 2920
    Secondary IDE Channel Intel 2920
    x
    x

    Intel ICH9 Family 2 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 2 - 2926 8086-2926
    Primary IDE Channel Intel 2926
    Secondary IDE Channel Intel 2926

    Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller 197b-2368
    Primary IDE Channel 197b-2368
    Secondary IDE Channel 197b-2368

    The latter group, are on a Jmicron JMB368, and really are Master/Slave
    on an IDE cable. The other four (of six max) are SATA drives. I think
    my BIOS has them set to "Native" but not compatible. Native is supposed
    to make up to six SATA drives appear in PCI space, as offsets to a PCI BAR.

    I'm only showing you that, to show potentially how they're grouped in
    terms of the hardware.

    *******

    If you want a test case to try, use HDTune from hdtune.com

    http://www.hdtune.com/files/hdtune_255.exe

    Run the benchmark, on your drives one at a time. The drive delivering
    4-8MB/sec transfer rate or so, is the one in PIO mode. As far as I know,
    the order the disks appear in HDTune, is the same as the order of
    disks in Disk Management.

    You can get out of PIO mode, using the "workaround" section of this article.
    You'll return to PIO mode again later, if the system sees enough errors
    to "gear down" that port. So if your hardware problem is persistent, you'll
    end up right back where you started.

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;817472

    You can use the HDTune "SMART" tab, to review the SMART statistics, and
    "see if the drive is in trouble" with respect to its internal statistics.
    That is how you get an early warning that the drive is in trouble.

    Paul
     
  3. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Paul wrote:
    > (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    >> I am troubleshooting an excessive CPU usage problem - almost
    >> totally unencumbered by any real knowledge.
    >>
    >> Thanks to Process Explorer (thinks again to Cheng and Tim) I have
    >> discovered that Interrupts are going out of sight - as in 50%
    >> CPU.
    >>
    >> Googling around, I see that a common source of this is Windows
    >> automatically downgrading a drive from DMA access to PIO because
    >> of too many errors from the drive.
    >>
    >> I've got six SATA ('data') drives and one IDE ('system') drive.
    >>
    >> I pulled the DVD drive and the Brand-X SATA card it was attached
    >> to and I pulled the video card so that I *think* all that's left
    >> are the SATA drives and IDE drive.
    >>
    >> When I go into Device Manager, I see:
    >>
    >> Primary IDE Channel #1 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    >> Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >>
    >> Primary IDE Channel #2 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    >> Device 1 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    >>
    >> Primary IDE Channel #3 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 6
    >> Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >>
    >> Secondary IDE Channel #1 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    >> Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >>
    >> Secondary IDE Channel #2 in list: Device 0 = PIO Mode <========
    >> Device 1 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    >>
    >> Secondary IDE Channel #3 in list: Device 0 = "Not Applicable"
    >> Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >>
    >> Looking at the mobo (Asus P5Q SE2), it looks to me like there is
    >> only one IDE connector.
    >>
    >> Since I have only a single IDE drive, does the above info
    >> implicate it with no doubt?
    >>
    >> Or could some aspect of the SATA setup be masquerading as a
    >> "Secondary IDE Channel"?

    >
    > Try the following in Device Manager.
    >
    > Right now, I'm on an ICH9R motherboard, with six SATA ports
    > on the Southbridge, plus a Jmicron chip controlling a single IDE cable.
    > In IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers, I can see
    >
    > Intel ICH9 Family 2 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 2 - 2926
    > Intel ICH9R/DO/DH 4 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 1 - 2920
    > Primary IDE Channel
    > Primary IDE Channel
    > Primary IDE Channel
    > Secondary IDE Channel
    > Secondary IDE Channel
    > Secondary IDE Channel
    > Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller
    >
    > Now, if I do properties on each, and look at the Details:Hardware Ids, I
    > see
    >
    > Intel ICH9 Family 2 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 2 - 2926
    > 8086-2926
    > Intel ICH9R/DO/DH 4 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 1 - 2920
    > 8086-2920
    > Primary IDE Channel Intel 2926
    > Primary IDE Channel Intel 2920
    > Primary IDE Channel 197b-2368
    > Secondary IDE Channel Intel 2926
    > Secondary IDE Channel Intel 2920
    > Secondary IDE Channel 197b-2368
    > Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller 197b-2368
    >
    > Rearranging this into groups, I would get a 4 port SATA controller (with
    > only
    > two ports listed), a 2 port SATA controller, and a 2 drive IDE controller.
    >
    > Intel ICH9R/DO/DH 4 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 1 - 2920
    > 8086-2920
    > Primary IDE Channel Intel 2920
    > Secondary IDE Channel Intel 2920
    > x
    > x
    >
    > Intel ICH9 Family 2 port Serial ATA Storage Controller 2 - 2926
    > 8086-2926
    > Primary IDE Channel Intel 2926
    > Secondary IDE Channel Intel 2926
    >
    > Standard Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller 197b-2368
    > Primary IDE Channel 197b-2368
    > Secondary IDE Channel 197b-2368
    >
    > The latter group, are on a Jmicron JMB368, and really are Master/Slave
    > on an IDE cable. The other four (of six max) are SATA drives. I think
    > my BIOS has them set to "Native" but not compatible. Native is supposed
    > to make up to six SATA drives appear in PCI space, as offsets to a PCI BAR.
    >
    > I'm only showing you that, to show potentially how they're grouped in
    > terms of the hardware.
    >
    > *******
    >
    > If you want a test case to try, use HDTune from hdtune.com
    >
    > http://www.hdtune.com/files/hdtune_255.exe
    >
    > Run the benchmark, on your drives one at a time. The drive delivering
    > 4-8MB/sec transfer rate or so, is the one in PIO mode. As far as I know,
    > the order the disks appear in HDTune, is the same as the order of
    > disks in Disk Management.
    >
    > You can get out of PIO mode, using the "workaround" section of this
    > article.
    > You'll return to PIO mode again later, if the system sees enough errors
    > to "gear down" that port. So if your hardware problem is persistent, you'll
    > end up right back where you started.
    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;817472
    >
    > You can use the HDTune "SMART" tab, to review the SMART statistics, and
    > "see if the drive is in trouble" with respect to its internal statistics.
    > That is how you get an early warning that the drive is in trouble.
    >
    > Paul


    It occurs to me, that what I'm seeing in Device Manager, isn't exactly
    right. The JMB368 only has one IDE cable, so it should have Primary Master
    and Primary Slave, rather than Primary and Secondary. So whatever they're
    doing, isn't as descriptive as it might be.

    You can get equally amusing entries in the BIOS screen, where disks are
    detected. The labeling there might be closer to what I'm thinking of,
    as the right way to do it (if there is a right way). SATA drives don't
    have masters and slaves, so shouldn't need any labels except a port number
    of some sort. IDE cables still have Master and Slave drives, so that is
    still a useful label. If an IDE chip had two ribbon cables, one
    could be Primary, the other Secondary, and that would make sense.

    Paul
     
  4. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    When you ask "How To Relate IDE Controller To Physical Drive?", is it that
    you want to know which physical drive is connected to which IDE channel?

    If I got that right, then why not simply, in Device Manager, click on
    "View" from the top menus, and choose "Devices by connection"...

    Then, all you do is click on the + sign next to the icon for your PC (to
    expand that branch) and then again on the + sign next to the icons for :

    + Microsoft ACPI Compliant System
    + PCI Bus
    + (Whatever the make /model of..) Storage Controller

    ....and finally, on :

    + Primary IDE Channel
    + Secondary IDE Channel

    ....under which you will see the respective drives, be they optical or HDs,
    that are connected to either.

    An example picture to illustrate what I mean...
    http://twitpic.com/2lz4xb

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)



    "(PeteCresswell)" <x@y.Invalid> wrote in message
    news:1una865to8d22q2gvhhdfvc6ev1eqd7d7c@4ax.com...
    >I am troubleshooting an excessive CPU usage problem - almost
    > totally unencumbered by any real knowledge.
    >
    > Thanks to Process Explorer (thinks again to Cheng and Tim) I have
    > discovered that Interrupts are going out of sight - as in 50%
    > CPU.
    >
    > Googling around, I see that a common source of this is Windows
    > automatically downgrading a drive from DMA access to PIO because
    > of too many errors from the drive.
    >
    > I've got six SATA ('data') drives and one IDE ('system') drive.
    >
    > I pulled the DVD drive and the Brand-X SATA card it was attached
    > to and I pulled the video card so that I *think* all that's left
    > are the SATA drives and IDE drive.
    >
    > When I go into Device Manager, I see:
    >
    > Primary IDE Channel #1 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    > Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >
    > Primary IDE Channel #2 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    > Device 1 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    >
    > Primary IDE Channel #3 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 6
    > Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >
    > Secondary IDE Channel #1 in list: Device 0 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    > Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >
    > Secondary IDE Channel #2 in list: Device 0 = PIO Mode <========
    > Device 1 = Ultra DMA Mode 5
    >
    > Secondary IDE Channel #3 in list: Device 0 = "Not Applicable"
    > Device 1 = "Not Applicable"
    >
    > Looking at the mobo (Asus P5Q SE2), it looks to me like there is
    > only one IDE connector.
    >
    > Since I have only a single IDE drive, does the above info
    > implicate it with no doubt?
    >
    > Or could some aspect of the SATA setup be masquerading as a
    > "Secondary IDE Channel"?
    > --
    > PeteCresswell
     
  5. (PeteCresswell)

    (PeteCresswell) Flightless Bird

    Per Paul:
    >It occurs to me, that what I'm seeing in Device Manager, isn't exactly
    >right. The JMB368 only has one IDE cable, so it should have Primary Master
    >and Primary Slave, rather than Primary and Secondary. So whatever they're
    >doing, isn't as descriptive as it might be.
    >
    >You can get equally amusing entries in the BIOS screen, where disks are
    >detected. The labeling there might be closer to what I'm thinking of,
    >as the right way to do it (if there is a right way). SATA drives don't
    >have masters and slaves, so shouldn't need any labels except a port number
    >of some sort. IDE cables still have Master and Slave drives, so that is
    >still a useful label. If an IDE chip had two ribbon cables, one
    >could be Primary, the other Secondary, and that would make sense.


    I'm on it. Thanks for all the time spent.

    I struggled with the Device Manager stuff and then hopped over to
    HD Tune.

    Seems to me like HD Tune holds the promise of cutting right to
    the chase.

    On five of the drives, I see "Ultra DMA CRC Error Count Data = 0.
    On the #1 drive, I see Data = 29 - but haven't decided if that is
    a red herring or not.

    On the #3 drive HD Tune seems to hang. I can't even kill it with
    Process Explorer and I have to re-boot the server each time.

    I have a feeling that if I fool around long enough, HD Tune is
    going to tell me that one of those six drives is flaky.

    I've done the "Error Scan (quick)" on each one.

    Haven't verified active access method on that suspicious #3 drive
    yet.

    Either way I'll do the complete error scan just on GPs. If it's
    Ultra DMA 5 like the others, I'll fall back and re-group - and
    maybe try applying that MS hotfix that makes the algorithm for
    downgrading from DMA 5 to PIO less severe (I think it changes it
    from six CRC checks total to 6 consecutive checks).

    I've got a new 2 TB drive coming from NewEgg - on the assumption
    that it will turn out tb a drive issue.... and besides, I can
    always use an extra drive... -)
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  6. (PeteCresswell)

    (PeteCresswell) Flightless Bird

    Per Tim Meddick:
    >
    >If I got that right, then why not simply, in Device Manager, click on
    >"View" from the top menus, and choose "Devices by connection"...
    >
    >Then, all you do is click on the + sign next to the icon for your PC (to
    >expand that branch) and then again on the + sign next to the icons for :


    That's helpful - I never even thought about "View" options.

    But I still had the problem of Windows referring to my drives by
    their model number instead of SNs - and I have three of the same
    model. One controller | Many Drives.

    I started down the HotFix path, but got intimidated by/lost in
    all the boilerplate - and the penalty for failure seems severe.

    Instead, I did the workaround where you un-install the offending
    "Secondary IDE Channel" (still not knowing which disc connected
    to it is problematic) and then let Windows re-install it -
    re-initializing the transfer mode or whatever to UDMA.

    That *seems* to have done the trick - at least temporarily.
    Interrupts are holding at less than 10% CPU and Device Manager
    says both Device 0 and Device 1 on that channel are, indeed,
    using UDMA. Compared to my backup server, though, 10% isn't all
    that wonderful either.... but at least processes aren't hanging
    every time I try to do something.

    Also, HD Tune is not hanging when I try to point it at that third
    drive. I'm running the slower complete error scan right now.

    Gonna leave it overnight and hope....

    Either way, my plan is to replace the suspect drive with the new
    one once it arrives and figure out what to do with it later -
    when it's not fouling up my WSH box any more.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  7. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    Then, in Device Manager (in normal "view by type" mode), look under the
    "Disk drives" item and at the drives that are listed there - it will give
    you their serial numbers.

    Then, in the "Properties" for each drive, click on the "Volumes" tab and
    then click on the "Populate" button.

    You should now be able to work out which serial number goes with which
    drive-letter (volume).

    So, knowing that, go back to "view by connection" - locate the Storage
    Controller again, and now you will know which serial number is associated
    with what volume / drive-letters...

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)




    "(PeteCresswell)" <x@y.Invalid> wrote in message
    news:rd4b86hccdejeuf2he58bnj40r3r8hech0@4ax.com...
    > Per Tim Meddick:
    >>
    >>If I got that right, then why not simply, in Device Manager, click on
    >>"View" from the top menus, and choose "Devices by connection"...
    >>
    >>Then, all you do is click on the + sign next to the icon for your PC (to
    >>expand that branch) and then again on the + sign next to the icons for :

    >
    > That's helpful - I never even thought about "View" options.
    >
    > But I still had the problem of Windows referring to my drives by
    > their model number instead of SNs - and I have three of the same
    > model. One controller | Many Drives.
    >
    > I started down the HotFix path, but got intimidated by/lost in
    > all the boilerplate - and the penalty for failure seems severe.
    >
    > Instead, I did the workaround where you un-install the offending
    > "Secondary IDE Channel" (still not knowing which disc connected
    > to it is problematic) and then let Windows re-install it -
    > re-initializing the transfer mode or whatever to UDMA.
    >
    > That *seems* to have done the trick - at least temporarily.
    > Interrupts are holding at less than 10% CPU and Device Manager
    > says both Device 0 and Device 1 on that channel are, indeed,
    > using UDMA. Compared to my backup server, though, 10% isn't all
    > that wonderful either.... but at least processes aren't hanging
    > every time I try to do something.
    >
    > Also, HD Tune is not hanging when I try to point it at that third
    > drive. I'm running the slower complete error scan right now.
    >
    > Gonna leave it overnight and hope....
    >
    > Either way, my plan is to replace the suspect drive with the new
    > one once it arrives and figure out what to do with it later -
    > when it's not fouling up my WSH box any more.
    > --
    > PeteCresswell
     
  8. (PeteCresswell)

    (PeteCresswell) Flightless Bird

    Per Tim Meddick:
    >Then, in Device Manager (in normal "view by type" mode), look under the
    >"Disk drives" item and at the drives that are listed there - it will give
    >you their serial numbers.
    >
    >Then, in the "Properties" for each drive, click on the "Volumes" tab and
    >then click on the "Populate" button.
    >
    >You should now be able to work out which serial number goes with which
    >drive-letter (volume).
    >
    >So, knowing that, go back to "view by connection" - locate the Storage
    >Controller again, and now you will know which serial number is associated
    >with what volume / drive-letters...


    Good stuff. Thanks!

    I'm going to start another thread looking for a utility to do
    that. Seems like if I can do it, a little utility can to it
    .....
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  9. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    Try the tiny [free] command-line utility from Sysinternals (Microsoft)
    called "devcon.exe".

    With it, you can search for attached classes of hardware attached to your
    system.

    Download "Devcon.exe" (Winzip compressed self-extractor setup) (78Kb)
    http://download.microsoft.com/download/1/1/f/11f7dd10-272d-4cd2-896f-9ce67f3e0240/devcon.exe

    *NB When you've "unzipped" the contents, use the copy of devcon.exe that's
    in the i386 folder unless you're running 64-bit WinXP, in which case use
    the one in the ia64 folder instead.

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)




    "(PeteCresswell)" <x@y.Invalid> wrote in message
    news:k2md86lgtbf8417agh7043s9a2ngvr9foa@4ax.com...
    > Per Tim Meddick:
    >>Then, in Device Manager (in normal "view by type" mode), look under the
    >>"Disk drives" item and at the drives that are listed there - it will give
    >>you their serial numbers.
    >>
    >>Then, in the "Properties" for each drive, click on the "Volumes" tab and
    >>then click on the "Populate" button.
    >>
    >>You should now be able to work out which serial number goes with which
    >>drive-letter (volume).
    >>
    >>So, knowing that, go back to "view by connection" - locate the Storage
    >>Controller again, and now you will know which serial number is
    >>associated
    >>with what volume / drive-letters...

    >
    > Good stuff. Thanks!
    >
    > I'm going to start another thread looking for a utility to do
    > that. Seems like if I can do it, a little utility can to it
    > ....
    > --
    > PeteCresswell
     
  10. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    P.S But, sorry, it won't tell you what volumes (drive-letters) are
    associated with any HD / cd/dvd drive devices it finds....

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)
     
  11. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    P.P.S. However, if you start the MMC console - Disk Management (by typing
    : DISKMGMT.MSC ...into the "Run" box).

    Ignore the upper explorer-style drive-list, and instead, refer to the stack
    of boxes below.

    Each box represents, at a glance, a physical drive with it's description at
    the far left hand side. The rest of the box to the right of it's
    description are representations of the volumes (drive-letters) that
    currently exist on each piece of physical hardware.

    I tink this may be more like what you were after...

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)
     
  12. Yousuf Khan

    Yousuf Khan Flightless Bird

    On 06/09/2010 5:49 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
    > I am troubleshooting an excessive CPU usage problem - almost
    > totally unencumbered by any real knowledge.
    >
    > Thanks to Process Explorer (thinks again to Cheng and Tim) I have
    > discovered that Interrupts are going out of sight - as in 50%
    > CPU.
    >
    > Googling around, I see that a common source of this is Windows
    > automatically downgrading a drive from DMA access to PIO because
    > of too many errors from the drive.


    Ah, yes, I've encountered this before. There's a Microsoft support doc
    on it:

    IDE ATA and ATAPI disks use PIO mode after multiple time-out or CRC
    errors occur
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/817472

    They list a bunch of hotfixes and patches that fix this. That's
    interesting, but you should ignore it and go straight to the "More
    Information" section, which lists some changes you can make to the
    Registry. After you reboot, then your bad drive should be back on DMA
    mode again.

    After that you should download a copy of Hard Disk Sentinel, which
    analyses SMART data from your drives and gives you a report about the
    condition of your drives. Even rates your drives for a quick comparison.

    Yousuf Khan
     

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