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How DOS-like is the CMD prompt in WinXP, will it allow replacement of windows-critical files?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by mm, Aug 22, 2010.

  1. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    How DOS-like is the CMD prompt in WinXP

    Will it allow replacement of windows-critical files?

    That is, in the past when I wanted to update a file that couldn't be
    updated while XP was running, I booted to win98SE on the same box, and
    did it there.

    Or when I had ONLY win98, I could boot to native DOS and do it there.


    Because of getting a new computer, I don't think win98 will run
    anymore, so can I use the CMD-wimdow/prompt? Or am I still in
    windows then, to such an extent that a Windows file that can't be
    modified while windows is running, still can't be modified?

    What do people do?

    I think the new computer will have a floppy drive. Do I boot to dos 7
    (or some version that understands long file names) from the floppy?

    Thanks a lot.
     
  2. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    You would have to disable Windows File Protection (WFP) to use CMD.exe to
    overwrite essential Windows OS files.

    Otherwise, Windows just copies across a new version of a file from :

    C:/WINDOWS\system32\dllcache

    ....if an operating system file is deleted or overwritten, whether that be
    from within Explorer or by the command-line in CMD.exe.


    What I think you want is the Windows Recovery Console.

    You can start the PC using the RC (similar to starting the PC with a DOS
    floppy) and can use similar commands in a DOS-like, text-based environment.

    For instructions on how to use RC, how to install RC as a start-up menu
    item and information on RC commands available, look up "Recovery Console"
    in the WindowsXP Help and Support Center.

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)




    "mm" <NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    news:9hm376hsga5f65mupmu5o3vdbh27bnm5tb@4ax.com...
    > How DOS-like is the CMD prompt in WinXP
    >
    > Will it allow replacement of windows-critical files?
    >
    > That is, in the past when I wanted to update a file that couldn't be
    > updated while XP was running, I booted to win98SE on the same box, and
    > did it there.
    >
    > Or when I had ONLY win98, I could boot to native DOS and do it there.
    >
    >
    > Because of getting a new computer, I don't think win98 will run
    > anymore, so can I use the CMD-wimdow/prompt? Or am I still in
    > windows then, to such an extent that a Windows file that can't be
    > modified while windows is running, still can't be modified?
    >
    > What do people do?
    >
    > I think the new computer will have a floppy drive. Do I boot to dos 7
    > (or some version that understands long file names) from the floppy?
    >
    > Thanks a lot.
     
  3. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 23 Aug 2010 03:40:32 +0100, "Tim Meddick"
    <timmeddick@o2.co.uk> wrote:

    >You would have to disable Windows File Protection (WFP) to use CMD.exe to
    >overwrite essential Windows OS files.
    >
    >Otherwise, Windows just copies across a new version of a file from :
    >
    >C:/WINDOWS\system32\dllcache
    >
    >...if an operating system file is deleted or overwritten, whether that be
    >from within Explorer or by the command-line in CMD.exe.
    >
    >
    >What I think you want is the Windows Recovery Console.
    >
    >You can start the PC using the RC (similar to starting the PC with a DOS
    >floppy) and can use similar commands in a DOS-like, text-based environment.
    >
    >For instructions on how to use RC, how to install RC as a start-up menu
    >item and information on RC commands available, look up "Recovery Console"
    >in the WindowsXP Help and Support Center.
    >

    Thanks.

    It says

    >To start the computer and use the Recovery Console
    >From the Setup CD-ROM
    >
    >Insert the Setup compact disc (CD) and restart the computer.


    Is this the same as the XP Installation Disk, the retail copy of of XP
    that I have?

    Or is this the Emergency Boot Disk that I usually put on a floppy? I
    guess I haven't made one for XP yet.

    Thanks.

    >If prompted, select any options required to boot from the CD.
    >When the text-based part of Setup begins, follow the prompts; choose the repair or recover option by pressing R.
    >If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot system, choose the installation that you need to access from the Recovery Console.
    >......




    >Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)
    >
    >
    >"mm" <NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    >news:9hm376hsga5f65mupmu5o3vdbh27bnm5tb@4ax.com...
    >> How DOS-like is the CMD prompt in WinXP
    >>
    >> Will it allow replacement of windows-critical files?
    >>
    >> That is, in the past when I wanted to update a file that couldn't be
    >> updated while XP was running, I booted to win98SE on the same box, and
    >> did it there.
    >>
    >> Or when I had ONLY win98, I could boot to native DOS and do it there.
    >>
    >>
    >> Because of getting a new computer, I don't think win98 will run
    >> anymore, so can I use the CMD-wimdow/prompt? Or am I still in
    >> windows then, to such an extent that a Windows file that can't be
    >> modified while windows is running, still can't be modified?
    >>
    >> What do people do?
    >>
    >> I think the new computer will have a floppy drive. Do I boot to dos 7
    >> (or some version that understands long file names) from the floppy?
    >>
    >> Thanks a lot.
     
  4. Tim Meddick

    Tim Meddick Flightless Bird

    No, you were right the first time - the XP Installation cd - the RC will
    not fit on a floppy - but you can install it so that it appears as a
    Startup Menu option - when the PC starts, you will be given a choice of OS
    to start plus Recovery Console.

    To install the RC so it appears as an item on the Window's Startup menu,
    insert your XP Installation cd-rom (has to be the same version that in
    already installed on you PC but does not have to be the original cd-rom -
    you will not be asked for a key to just install the RC) then type :
    "d:/i386\winnt32.exe /cmdcons" into the "Run" box and click [ok].


    It will install to c:/cmdcons and the startup menu may look something like
    this :


    Choose the Operating System to Start

    1. Microsoft Windows XP Professional
    2. Microsoft Windows Recovery Console

    Press F8 for advanced startup options.

    For a list of Recovery Console commands, their uses and syntax, start the
    Windows Help and Support Center and search: "Recovery Console Commands"

    Here is a list of all RC commands, but beware - their usage can differ a
    little from their CMD.exe counterparts.

    ATTRIB
    BATCH
    BOOTCFG
    CD
    CHDIR
    CHKDSK
    CLS
    COPY
    DEL
    DELETE
    DIR
    DISABLE
    DISKPART
    ENABLE
    EXIT
    EXPAND
    FIXBOOT
    FIXMBR
    FORMAT
    HELP
    LISTSVC
    LOGON
    MAP
    MD
    MKDIR
    MORE
    NET
    RD
    REN
    RENAME
    RMDIR
    SET
    SYSTEMROOT
    TYPE

    But the copy command will enable you to do what you were asking in the
    first place, and delete or overwrite any protected operating system files
    and also copy certain files that are normally always "in use" such as the
    system files in :
    c:/windows\system32\config
    It is useful to make a backup of these files while using RC so you can
    restore them again should the registry become corrupted at a future date.

    But be aware that you would need to overwrite not only files in the
    system32 directory, but also ones of the same name in
    c:/windows\system32\dllcache, so that they are not overwritten by the
    originals in this directory when Windows starts and WFP detects the change.

    ==

    Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)




    "mm" <NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    news:ms9576hrmf3khf66m486ge8849dq0c02so@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 23 Aug 2010 03:40:32 +0100, "Tim Meddick"
    > <timmeddick@o2.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >>You would have to disable Windows File Protection (WFP) to use CMD.exe to
    >>overwrite essential Windows OS files.
    >>
    >>Otherwise, Windows just copies across a new version of a file from :
    >>
    >>C:/WINDOWS\system32\dllcache
    >>
    >>...if an operating system file is deleted or overwritten, whether that be
    >>from within Explorer or by the command-line in CMD.exe.
    >>
    >>
    >>What I think you want is the Windows Recovery Console.
    >>
    >>You can start the PC using the RC (similar to starting the PC with a DOS
    >>floppy) and can use similar commands in a DOS-like, text-based
    >>environment.
    >>
    >>For instructions on how to use RC, how to install RC as a start-up menu
    >>item and information on RC commands available, look up "Recovery Console"
    >>in the WindowsXP Help and Support Center.
    >>

    > Thanks.
    >
    > It says
    >
    >>To start the computer and use the Recovery Console
    >>From the Setup CD-ROM
    >>
    >>Insert the Setup compact disc (CD) and restart the computer.

    >
    > Is this the same as the XP Installation Disk, the retail copy of of XP
    > that I have?
    >
    > Or is this the Emergency Boot Disk that I usually put on a floppy? I
    > guess I haven't made one for XP yet.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    >>If prompted, select any options required to boot from the CD.
    >>When the text-based part of Setup begins, follow the prompts; choose the
    >>repair or recover option by pressing R.
    >>If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot system, choose the installation
    >>that you need to access from the Recovery Console.
    >>......

    >
    >
    >
    >>Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :)
    >>
    >>
    >>"mm" <NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    >>news:9hm376hsga5f65mupmu5o3vdbh27bnm5tb@4ax.com...
    >>> How DOS-like is the CMD prompt in WinXP
    >>>
    >>> Will it allow replacement of windows-critical files?
    >>>
    >>> That is, in the past when I wanted to update a file that couldn't be
    >>> updated while XP was running, I booted to win98SE on the same box, and
    >>> did it there.
    >>>
    >>> Or when I had ONLY win98, I could boot to native DOS and do it there.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Because of getting a new computer, I don't think win98 will run
    >>> anymore, so can I use the CMD-wimdow/prompt? Or am I still in
    >>> windows then, to such an extent that a Windows file that can't be
    >>> modified while windows is running, still can't be modified?
    >>>
    >>> What do people do?
    >>>
    >>> I think the new computer will have a floppy drive. Do I boot to dos 7
    >>> (or some version that understands long file names) from the floppy?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks a lot.

    >
     

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