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Has anyone used Windows 7?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Mark A. Sam, Mar 5, 2010.

  1. Mark A. Sam

    Mark A. Sam Flightless Bird

    Hello,

    I am considering a new machine and can get it with XP installed, but want to
    try Windows 7. I have heard good reports about it. Is anyone using it and
    can comment about it?

    Thank you and God Bless,

    Mark A. Sam
     
  2. R. McCarty

    R. McCarty Flightless Bird

    7 is fine. A well thought out, highly polished OS. If you're willing to
    use and adapt to some minor changes ( new Taskbar ) you'll quickly
    come to like using it.
    If XP compatibility is one of your concerns you can get Professional
    or Ultimate and it comes with XP mode. ( Virtualized XP ).

    "Mark A. Sam" <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote in message
    news:uF3cUyFvKHA.5008@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am considering a new machine and can get it with XP installed, but want
    > to try Windows 7. I have heard good reports about it. Is anyone using it
    > and can comment about it?
    >
    > Thank you and God Bless,
    >
    > Mark A. Sam
    >
     
  3. Rhino

    Rhino Flightless Bird

    "Mark A. Sam" <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote in message
    news:uF3cUyFvKHA.5008@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am considering a new machine and can get it with XP installed, but want
    > to try Windows 7. I have heard good reports about it. Is anyone using it
    > and can comment about it?
    >


    I don't have Windows 7 on my own computer but I was on a lot of customer
    computers on my last job, which ended recently, doing tech support. A good
    number of those customers had Windows 7 and we found it quite easy to work
    with. Whereas Vista was a pain in the rear for at least the first year due
    to any number of problems, Windows 7 seemed to work very well from the very
    beginning. Apparently, there was a large beta program for Windows 7 and I
    suspect that has made all the difference; all the major bugs were found -
    and fixed - BEFORE they released it to the general public.

    I don't want to guarantee you a trouble-free experience - computers are just
    too complex and there are too many variations in hardware to hope for that -
    but you should have a lot less trouble than most Vista users did with
    Windows 7.

    --
    Rhino
     
  4. Mark A. Sam

    Mark A. Sam Flightless Bird

    Thank you for your responses. I'm kind of excited to try it. I know about
    Vista. Uggh. What a dog. My client is purchasing a Mac and I'll be
    configuring that with Windows7. I'm looking forward to that also, as I have
    no experience with a Mac.



    "Mark A. Sam" <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote in message
    news:uF3cUyFvKHA.5008@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am considering a new machine and can get it with XP installed, but want
    > to try Windows 7. I have heard good reports about it. Is anyone using it
    > and can comment about it?
    >
    > Thank you and God Bless,
    >
    > Mark A. Sam
    >
     
  5. smlunatick

    smlunatick Flightless Bird

    On Mar 5, 12:14 pm, "R. McCarty" <PcEngWork-NoSp...@mindspring.com>
    wrote:
    >  7 is fine. A well thought out, highly polished OS. If you're willing to
    > use and adapt to some minor changes ( new Taskbar ) you'll quickly
    > come to like using it.
    >  If XP compatibility is one of your concerns you can get Professional
    > or Ultimate and it comes with XP mode. ( Virtualized XP ).
    >
    > "Mark A. Sam" <MarkA...@EmEssEn.Com> wrote in messagenews:uF3cUyFvKHA.5008@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >
    > > Hello,

    >
    > > I am considering a new machine and can get it with XP installed, but want
    > > to try Windows 7.  I have heard good reports about it.  Is anyone using it
    > > and can comment about it?

    >
    > > Thank you and God Bless,

    >
    > > Mark A. Sam


    Consider Professional as the better choice. Ultimate mainly offers
    BitLocker and the additional GUI languages. For me, not the worth the
    price. (I have it.)
     
  6. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 5 Mar 2010 07:08:01 -0500, "Mark A. Sam"
    <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I am considering a new machine and can get it with XP installed, but want to
    > try Windows 7. I have heard good reports about it. Is anyone using it and
    > can comment about it?




    I've been using the released version since it first came out, and the
    Release Candidate before that. I like it very much. As with almost all
    versions of Windows, it is better than its predecessors.

    Here are my views; three points below:

    1. If you were asking about upgrading, I would give you my standard
    answer, as follows:

    A change of operating system should be driven by need, not just
    because there is a new version available. Are you having a problem
    with Windows XP that you expect Windows 7 to solve? Do you have or
    expect to get new hardware or software that is supported in Windows 7,
    but not in XP? Is there some new feature in Windows 7 that you need or
    yearn for? Does your job require you have skills in Windows 7? Are you
    a computer hobbyist who enjoys playing with whatever is newest?

    If the answer to one or more of those questions is yes (and your
    hardware is adequate for Windows 7), then you should get Windows 7.
    Otherwise most people should stick with what they have. There is
    *always* a learning curve and a potential for problems when you take a
    step as big as this one, regardless of how wonderful whatever you're
    contemplating moving to is. Sooner or later you'll have to upgrade (to
    Windows 7 or its successor) because you'll want support for hardware
    or software that you can't get in XP, but don't rush it.

    I say all the above despite the fact that I'm a big Windows 7 fan. I
    think it's the best and most stable of all versions of Windows.

    2. But since you are talking about getting a new computer, I strongly
    recommend getting it with Windows 7. It hardly ever makes sense to
    take a step backward by getting a new computer with an old version of
    an operating system.

    3. Be aware that as with any new operating system, there are
    differences from what you are accustomed to. Differences will take you
    some time to get accustomed to, and for many people differences cause
    them frustration. So be prepared for some initial frustration, but
    give yourself enough time to adapt to the differences, rather than
    throwing about the new Windows 7 because you haven't yet learned
    enough about it.


    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  7. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 5 Mar 2010 09:14:04 -0500, "Mark A. Sam"
    <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote:

    > Thank you for your responses. I'm kind of excited to try it. I know about
    > Vista. Uggh. What a dog.



    I completely disagree. I think Vista was better than XP, and I think
    Windows 7 is better than Vista. As I said in my earlier message in
    this thread, almost every version of Windows is better than the ones
    that came before it.


    > My client is purchasing a Mac and I'll be
    > configuring that with Windows7. I'm looking forward to that also, as I have
    > no experience with a Mac.



    Be aware that I know next to nothing about the Macintosh, but let me
    make just one comment: a Macintosh invariably costs substantially more
    than an equivalent Windows machine. Although I personally wouldn't buy
    a Macintosh, I can understand why somebody would want to if they
    prefer the Macintosh software. But it makes no sense to me to pay the
    extra money for a Macintosh if you are going to run the Windows
    software on it.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  8. Mark A. Sam

    Mark A. Sam Flightless Bird

    You must know how to configure it or maybe it was the version I used. On
    two machines they are Home Edition, and another I upgraded to Ultimate. But
    they are really slow loading, that is my biggest gripe.


    "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:hr72p5hmjb9ijojt1lthbgq6s6plojcr3o@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 5 Mar 2010 09:14:04 -0500, "Mark A. Sam"
    > <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you for your responses. I'm kind of excited to try it. I know
    >> about
    >> Vista. Uggh. What a dog.

    >
    >
    > I completely disagree. I think Vista was better than XP, and I think
    > Windows 7 is better than Vista. As I said in my earlier message in
    > this thread, almost every version of Windows is better than the ones
    > that came before it.
    >
    >
    >> My client is purchasing a Mac and I'll be
    >> configuring that with Windows7. I'm looking forward to that also, as I
    >> have
    >> no experience with a Mac.

    >
    >
    > Be aware that I know next to nothing about the Macintosh, but let me
    > make just one comment: a Macintosh invariably costs substantially more
    > than an equivalent Windows machine. Although I personally wouldn't buy
    > a Macintosh, I can understand why somebody would want to if they
    > prefer the Macintosh software. But it makes no sense to me to pay the
    > extra money for a Macintosh if you are going to run the Windows
    > software on it.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  9. Mark A. Sam

    Mark A. Sam Flightless Bird

    I believe you. I am excited about trying Win7.

    "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:u272p5lhie8kcptr43dq88vd1eg4djc20e@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 5 Mar 2010 07:08:01 -0500, "Mark A. Sam"
    > <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote:
    >
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> I am considering a new machine and can get it with XP installed, but want
    >> to
    >> try Windows 7. I have heard good reports about it. Is anyone using it
    >> and
    >> can comment about it?

    >
    >
    >
    > I've been using the released version since it first came out, and the
    > Release Candidate before that. I like it very much. As with almost all
    > versions of Windows, it is better than its predecessors.
    >
    > Here are my views; three points below:
    >
    > 1. If you were asking about upgrading, I would give you my standard
    > answer, as follows:
    >
    > A change of operating system should be driven by need, not just
    > because there is a new version available. Are you having a problem
    > with Windows XP that you expect Windows 7 to solve? Do you have or
    > expect to get new hardware or software that is supported in Windows 7,
    > but not in XP? Is there some new feature in Windows 7 that you need or
    > yearn for? Does your job require you have skills in Windows 7? Are you
    > a computer hobbyist who enjoys playing with whatever is newest?
    >
    > If the answer to one or more of those questions is yes (and your
    > hardware is adequate for Windows 7), then you should get Windows 7.
    > Otherwise most people should stick with what they have. There is
    > *always* a learning curve and a potential for problems when you take a
    > step as big as this one, regardless of how wonderful whatever you're
    > contemplating moving to is. Sooner or later you'll have to upgrade (to
    > Windows 7 or its successor) because you'll want support for hardware
    > or software that you can't get in XP, but don't rush it.
    >
    > I say all the above despite the fact that I'm a big Windows 7 fan. I
    > think it's the best and most stable of all versions of Windows.
    >
    > 2. But since you are talking about getting a new computer, I strongly
    > recommend getting it with Windows 7. It hardly ever makes sense to
    > take a step backward by getting a new computer with an old version of
    > an operating system.
    >
    > 3. Be aware that as with any new operating system, there are
    > differences from what you are accustomed to. Differences will take you
    > some time to get accustomed to, and for many people differences cause
    > them frustration. So be prepared for some initial frustration, but
    > give yourself enough time to adapt to the differences, rather than
    > throwing about the new Windows 7 because you haven't yet learned
    > enough about it.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  10. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 5 Mar 2010 10:34:13 -0500, "Mark A. Sam"
    <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote:

    > I believe you. I am excited about trying Win7.



    Good, glad to hear it. But please pay attention to point 3 below. I
    suspect that your dislike of Vista was largely because you didn't
    "give yourself enough time to adapt to the differences."


    > "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:u272p5lhie8kcptr43dq88vd1eg4djc20e@4ax.com...
    > > On Fri, 5 Mar 2010 07:08:01 -0500, "Mark A. Sam"
    > > <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Hello,
    > >>
    > >> I am considering a new machine and can get it with XP installed, but want
    > >> to
    > >> try Windows 7. I have heard good reports about it. Is anyone using it
    > >> and
    > >> can comment about it?

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > I've been using the released version since it first came out, and the
    > > Release Candidate before that. I like it very much. As with almost all
    > > versions of Windows, it is better than its predecessors.
    > >
    > > Here are my views; three points below:
    > >
    > > 1. If you were asking about upgrading, I would give you my standard
    > > answer, as follows:
    > >
    > > A change of operating system should be driven by need, not just
    > > because there is a new version available. Are you having a problem
    > > with Windows XP that you expect Windows 7 to solve? Do you have or
    > > expect to get new hardware or software that is supported in Windows 7,
    > > but not in XP? Is there some new feature in Windows 7 that you need or
    > > yearn for? Does your job require you have skills in Windows 7? Are you
    > > a computer hobbyist who enjoys playing with whatever is newest?
    > >
    > > If the answer to one or more of those questions is yes (and your
    > > hardware is adequate for Windows 7), then you should get Windows 7.
    > > Otherwise most people should stick with what they have. There is
    > > *always* a learning curve and a potential for problems when you take a
    > > step as big as this one, regardless of how wonderful whatever you're
    > > contemplating moving to is. Sooner or later you'll have to upgrade (to
    > > Windows 7 or its successor) because you'll want support for hardware
    > > or software that you can't get in XP, but don't rush it.
    > >
    > > I say all the above despite the fact that I'm a big Windows 7 fan. I
    > > think it's the best and most stable of all versions of Windows.
    > >
    > > 2. But since you are talking about getting a new computer, I strongly
    > > recommend getting it with Windows 7. It hardly ever makes sense to
    > > take a step backward by getting a new computer with an old version of
    > > an operating system.
    > >
    > > 3. Be aware that as with any new operating system, there are
    > > differences from what you are accustomed to. Differences will take you
    > > some time to get accustomed to, and for many people differences cause
    > > them frustration. So be prepared for some initial frustration, but
    > > give yourself enough time to adapt to the differences, rather than
    > > throwing about the new Windows 7 because you haven't yet learned
    > > enough about it.
    > >
    > >
    > > --
    > > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > > Please Reply to the Newsgroup

    >


    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  11. Nil

    Nil Flightless Bird

    On 05 Mar 2010, "Mark A. Sam" <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote in
    microsoft.public.windowsxp.general:

    > Thank you for your responses. I'm kind of excited to try it. I
    > know about Vista. Uggh. What a dog.


    I have computers running XP, Vista, and Windows 7. I have no great
    problems with Vista - it works just fine for me. Win 7 is more like
    Vista than XP If you truly hate Vista as you say, you might not like
    Win 7 either.
     
  12. Mark A. Sam

    Mark A. Sam Flightless Bird

    No, it is simply because Vista was very slow. I'm currently taking on
    Dreamweaver, Flash, and soon Apple, which are all strangers to me.
    Everything in the past was Microsoft. So adapting isn't the issue.

    >
    > Good, glad to hear it. But please pay attention to point 3 below. I
    > suspect that your dislike of Vista was largely because you didn't
    > "give yourself enough time to adapt to the differences."
    >
     
  13. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 5 Mar 2010 12:07:36 -0500, "Mark A. Sam"
    <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote:


    > No, it is simply because Vista was very slow.



    No, it isn't. Undoubtedly you are ascribing to Vista what should be
    blamed on one or both of the following:

    1. Your hardware was inadequate for Vista. For example, you might not
    have had enough RAM for the applications you ran under Vista.

    2. You were infected with malware.



    > I'm currently taking on
    > Dreamweaver, Flash, and soon Apple, which are all strangers to me.
    > Everything in the past was Microsoft. So adapting isn't the issue.
    >
    > >
    > > Good, glad to hear it. But please pay attention to point 3 below. I
    > > suspect that your dislike of Vista was largely because you didn't
    > > "give yourself enough time to adapt to the differences."
    > >

    >


    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  14. Mark A. Sam

    Mark A. Sam Flightless Bird

    I don't know the RAM, but they were all new machines with Home Edition. One
    I updated to Ultimate so it could join a domain. A friend told me that his
    ran well after he configured it. But I had heard a lot of people complain
    of sluggishness. It doesn't matter, since it is off the market.




    "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:4dj2p51hbvn3gbotcgg239diiodrgn2es1@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 5 Mar 2010 12:07:36 -0500, "Mark A. Sam"
    > <MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> No, it is simply because Vista was very slow.

    >
    >
    > No, it isn't. Undoubtedly you are ascribing to Vista what should be
    > blamed on one or both of the following:
    >
    > 1. Your hardware was inadequate for Vista. For example, you might not
    > have had enough RAM for the applications you ran under Vista.
    >
    > 2. You were infected with malware.
    >
    >
    >
    >> I'm currently taking on
    >> Dreamweaver, Flash, and soon Apple, which are all strangers to me.
    >> Everything in the past was Microsoft. So adapting isn't the issue.
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Good, glad to hear it. But please pay attention to point 3 below. I
    >> > suspect that your dislike of Vista was largely because you didn't
    >> > "give yourself enough time to adapt to the differences."
    >> >

    >>

    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  15. Leythos

    Leythos Flightless Bird

    In article <uF3cUyFvKHA.5008@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl>, MarkASam@EmEssEn.Com
    says...
    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am considering a new machine and can get it with XP installed, but want to
    > try Windows 7. I have heard good reports about it. Is anyone using it and
    > can comment about it?


    I have Win 7 Ultimate and Professional running on hundreds of NEW
    computers and dozens of older computers.

    Win 7 is slower than XP, but we expect that, it's always been that way
    with MS.

    Win 7 seems to be very stable, like XP is.

    Win 7 needs a good performing graphics card, one with at least 256MB of
    dedicated memory, not that shared memory crap found in cheap computers.
    If you can get a quality 512MB card your video performance will be
    better.

    Win 7 needs at least 2GB ram for basic operation with MS Office. I
    normally spec NEW machines with 4GB and purchase the x64 bit version for
    Core 2 Duo machines as a min.

    On older machines, that were running XP, Win 7 seems to be a leap ahead
    of Vista.

    Expect your machine to be slower than on XP, and make sure that your old
    XP machine has at least 1GB RAM if you want to start playing with Win 7,
    upgrade to 2-4GB if you plan on keeping Win 7 on that told machine.

    --
    You can't trust your best friends, your five senses, only the little
    voice inside you that most civilians don't even hear -- Listen to that.
    Trust yourself.
    spam999free@rrohio.com (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
  16. apistomaster(nospam)

    apistomaster(nospam) Flightless Bird

    I just bought a Sony Vaio NW and a $1000 build of a Dell Studio 17
    laptop and am going from only experience with XP except the one Vista
    Laptop I helped a friend set up, And there are new ways of doing thing
    to learn but I find I do like my Windows Home Premium a lot.
    Both are 64 bit versions and have 4 gb RAM.
     

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