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Hard Drives

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Curby, Mar 15, 2010.

  1. Curby

    Curby Flightless Bird

    I recently did a system restore and now my C drive has only 2Gb memory and my
    D drive has 40G, but the system won't utilize the D drive and therefore I
    keep running low on memory and can not run any programs (I only have 60MB of
    memory)) ???
     
  2. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Curby wrote:
    > I recently did a system restore and now my C drive has only 2Gb memory and my
    > D drive has 40G, but the system won't utilize the D drive and therefore I
    > keep running low on memory and can not run any programs (I only have 60MB of
    > memory)) ???


    There are free tools for resizing disk partitions. No matter whether you use
    a free tool, or a commercial tool like Partition Magic, make sure your disk data
    is *backed up* first. The operation you attempt with tools like this, can fail,
    and if this is your only copy of some data, you might have nothing left. I've
    heard of this tool ruining at least one partition, so it happens.

    http://www.partition-tool.com/easeus-partition-manager/help/resizing-and-moving-partition.htm

    *******

    A good question would be, how did this happen in the first place ?

    If these are all primary partitions (i.e. the partition entries are in the
    MBR sector), this tool will be able to list the sizes of the partitions,
    their starting location and so on. It could be, that some tool you used
    in the past, has put the entries in the partition table in the wrong order,
    and the automated restoration ended up writing to the wrong partition as
    a result.

    PTEDIT32 for Windows
    ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/tools/pq/utilities/PTEDIT32.zip

    In this example, there are three primary partitions, and they're in order. The
    first entry is at the beginning of the disk. The third is near the end of the disk.
    If two of these entries got swapped, nothing bad happens. It is just that some
    tools don't handle such a situation properly. Some tools might assume that the
    first partition is always their "C:" for example. And that could result in
    a mixup and your situation, with the restore going into the small partition.

    PTEDIT32 screenshot
    http://www.vistax64.com/attachments...n-partiton-recovery-dell-xps-420-dell-tbl.gif

    I've never used PTEDIT32 to make changes. I only use it for verifying what is
    going on. I make actual changes to the table with a Linux LiveCD (because at
    that point in time, Windows is not running, and no file systems are "live").
    I've never bothered to test whether PTEDIT32 can edit the MBR and make changes
    or not. In any case, don't change anything in the PTEDIT32 window, as you
    could easily lose data that way. I use the tool as a convenient way to
    observe the four primary partitions listed in the MBR sector, and that is
    all I do with it.

    You don't need to use PTEDIT32 at all, and you can just use a partition
    resizing tool to fix the problem. But it could be, that if you go to
    restore the system a year from now, the same thing could happen, for
    the same reasons.

    HTH,
    Paul
     
  3. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2010 06:08:01 -0700, Curby
    <Curby@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    > I recently did a system restore and now my C drive has only 2Gb memory and my
    > D drive has 40G, but the system won't utilize the D drive and therefore I
    > keep running low on memory and can not run any programs (I only have 60MB of
    > memory)) ???



    Several points and questions for you:

    1. The word "memory" refers to the thing that you probably have
    somewhere between 256-MB and 1GB of--RAM (Random Access Memory). You
    are undoubtedly talking about Disk Space, not memory. Please don't
    call it by the wrong name, because if you do, you run the risk of
    confusing those of us who are trying to help you, and therefore
    getting wrong answers from us.

    2. Are your C and D drives physically separate drives or two
    partitions on your only physical drive? If partitions, did you create
    the partitions, or did the drive come that way when you bought the
    computer.

    3. You say that C only has 2GB, but I assume that by that you mean
    that it only has 2GB *available*. How big is it in total? You say that
    D has 40GB. Is that its total size or its free size (or both).

    4. You say the system won't utilize the D drive. It *will* utilize it,
    but it does so only when you direct it to do so. Whenever you save a
    file, it saves it where you tell it to put it.

    5. You say you "recently did a system restore." Please clarify exactly
    how you did it. Also tell us why you did it.

    6. How much free space did C have before doing the system restore? How
    much free space did it have immediately after doing the system
    restore? How long did it take to go from that amount of free space to
    what you have free now?

    7. One of the very likely situations that resulted in filling up much
    of the drive is a malware infection. So please tell us what anti-virus
    program you run, and what anti-spyware programs you run. Are they kept
    up to date?

    Please answer all the questions above, and it will then be much easier
    to help you.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  4. Ben Myers

    Ben Myers Flightless Bird

    "Curby" <Curby@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:A89E56F4-D5D5-46C5-A54A-89D35732250B@microsoft.com...
    > I recently did a system restore and now my C drive has only 2Gb memory and my
    > D drive has 40G, but the system won't utilize the D drive and therefore I
    > keep running low on memory and can not run any programs (I only have 60MB of
    > memory)) ???


    Please describe the system restore you performed, including whether or not
    a reformat was involved. Also, you may need to upgrade your memory.
    Windows XP requires 64 megabytes of memory.

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314865

    Ben
     
  5. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Tue, 16 Mar 2010 11:27:49 -0400, "Ben Myers"
    <benjmyers@REMOVEmindspring.com> wrote:

    > "Curby" <Curby@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:A89E56F4-D5D5-46C5-A54A-89D35732250B@microsoft.com...
    > > I recently did a system restore and now my C drive has only 2Gb memory and my
    > > D drive has 40G, but the system won't utilize the D drive and therefore I
    > > keep running low on memory and can not run any programs (I only have 60MB of
    > > memory)) ???

    >
    > Please describe the system restore you performed, including whether or not
    > a reformat was involved. Also, you may need to upgrade your memory.
    > Windows XP requires 64 megabytes of memory.



    How much memory you need for Windows XP depends on what apps you run.
    But despite Microsoft's stated minimums, 64MB is *way* too little for
    anyone who does any more than play solitaire. The amount needed is
    256MB or more.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     

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