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Four minute WinXP boot up

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by PSRumbagh, Jan 30, 2010.

  1. PSRumbagh

    PSRumbagh Flightless Bird

    It takes about 4 minutes for my Compaq V2000 laptop to boot-up using WinXP
    Home with SP3. NORMAL boot-up invokes 58 processes, 107 services, 489
    modules, 215 drivers , 25 startup and 29 IP connections. SAFE MODE boot-up
    invokes 12 processes, 107 services, 158 modules, 215 drivers, 25 startup and
    0 IP connections. I am certain that many of the normal boot-up items are
    loaded for programs that I scarcely use. How do I figure out which of the
    normal boot up items is really needed and which are not needed? If I turn
    off a truely needed program in the Start Up folder can I do damage to my PC?
     
  2. db

    db Flightless Bird

    if booting up into safe mode
    is much quicker than your
    normal mode,

    then you might try to execute
    a process called "clean boot"

    it is a method to disable all
    third party / non microsoft
    programs and services from
    booting with normal mode
    windows.

    afterwards, you can determine
    which third party programs and
    services are needed to stay
    disabled.

    --
    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    - Systems Analyst
    - Database Developer
    - Accountancy
    - Veteran of the Armed Forces
    - @Hotmail.com
    - nntp Postologist
    ~ "share the nirvana" - dbZen

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    >
    >


    "PSRumbagh" <PSRumbagh@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:C62F9562-DC07-41BA-A69A-89E03B71D26C@microsoft.com...
    > It takes about 4 minutes for my Compaq V2000 laptop to boot-up using WinXP
    > Home with SP3. NORMAL boot-up invokes 58 processes, 107 services, 489
    > modules, 215 drivers , 25 startup and 29 IP connections. SAFE MODE boot-up
    > invokes 12 processes, 107 services, 158 modules, 215 drivers, 25 startup
    > and
    > 0 IP connections. I am certain that many of the normal boot-up items are
    > loaded for programs that I scarcely use. How do I figure out which of the
    > normal boot up items is really needed and which are not needed? If I turn
    > off a truely needed program in the Start Up folder can I do damage to my
    > PC?
     
  3. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    PSRumbagh wrote:

    > It takes about 4 minutes for my Compaq V2000 laptop to boot-up using WinXP
    > Home with SP3. NORMAL boot-up invokes 58 processes, 107 services, 489
    > modules, 215 drivers , 25 startup and 29 IP connections. SAFE MODE boot-up
    > invokes 12 processes, 107 services, 158 modules, 215 drivers, 25 startup and
    > 0 IP connections. I am certain that many of the normal boot-up items are
    > loaded for programs that I scarcely use. How do I figure out which of the
    > normal boot up items is really needed and which are not needed? If I turn
    > off a truely needed program in the Start Up folder can I do damage to my PC?


    Why does your host create any [permanent] IP connections when you startup
    Windows? You have a lot of mapped drives? If so, each one times time to
    renegotiate a new connection.
     
  4. Don Phillipson

    Don Phillipson Flightless Bird

    "PSRumbagh" <PSRumbagh@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:C62F9562-DC07-41BA-A69A-89E03B71D26C@microsoft.com...

    > It takes about 4 minutes for my Compaq V2000 laptop to boot-up using WinXP
    > Home with SP3. NORMAL boot-up invokes 58 processes, 107 services, 489
    > modules, 215 drivers , 25 startup and 29 IP connections. SAFE MODE boot-up
    > invokes 12 processes, 107 services, 158 modules, 215 drivers, 25 startup

    and
    > 0 IP connections. I am certain that many of the normal boot-up items are
    > loaded for programs that I scarcely use. How do I figure out which of the
    > normal boot up items is really needed and which are not needed? If I turn
    > off a truely needed program in the Start Up folder can I do damage to my

    PC?

    Trial and error is the only way. So long as you have System
    Restore set ON (so you can restore to yesterday's OS in case
    of need) you cannot damage a PC by disabling startup routines.

    The single likeliest cause of slow boot is a malware/virus scan
    executed at first boot. Only you can decide whether you need
    this or not.

    Guidelines for tinkering:
    1. Disable Windows Fast Find. (This may help users who are
    so clueless about filenames they need to search within files
    to identify them.)
    2. Disable office suite startup routines (as for MS Office, Open
    Office, Corel Office etc.) which seek to make single apps load
    faster (e.g. spreadsheet) by preloading at boot some sort of
    master control.
    3. MSCONFIG gives you a list of TSR apps loaded at
    boot. Disable Task Manager unless needed and any others
    (e.g. multiple keyboards) you do not use daily.
    4. Look carefully at which Windows Services (among about
    120) are set ON or AUTOMATIC. You may be able to locate
    those that you seldom need and switch them off.

    Report results in this thread in case helpful to others.
    --
    Don Phillipson
    Carlsbad Springs
    (Ottawa, Canada)
     
  5. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Jan 30, 1:55 pm, PSRumbagh <PSRumb...@discussions.microsoft.com>
    wrote:
    > It takes about 4 minutes for my Compaq V2000 laptop to boot-up using WinXP
    > Home with SP3.  NORMAL boot-up invokes 58 processes, 107 services, 489
    > modules, 215 drivers , 25 startup and 29 IP connections. SAFE MODE boot-up
    > invokes 12 processes, 107 services, 158 modules, 215 drivers, 25 startup and
    > 0 IP connections.  I am certain that many of the normal boot-up items are
    > loaded for programs that I scarcely use.  How do I figure out which of the
    > normal boot up items is really needed and which are not needed?  If I turn
    > off a truely needed program in the Start Up folder can I do damage to my PC?


    I would be curious to know how you came these numbers?

    Trial and error is a method, but not very scientific, can be
    frustrating, involves guesswork and can take a long time.

    You can be the first victim of my latest copy/paste:

    First perform a scan for malicious software:

    Download, install, update and do a full scan with these free malware
    detection programs:

    Malwarebytes (MBAM): http://malwarebytes.org/
    SUPERAntiSpyware: (SAS): http://www.superantispyware.com/

    They can be uninstalled later if desired.

    Reboot.

    Since there may be some system configuration changes, you may want to
    manually create a System Restore point before continuing.

    Have you installed any third party malicious software tools with built
    in realtime protection
    such as Norton, McAfee, AVG, Spybot, ZoneAlarm, etc.? They usually
    install and set themselves
    up to load things automatically, check for updates, or scan your
    system on every reboot. This
    can take a lot of time.

    If these programs have any kind of resident realtime protection
    enabled you can count on that to slow
    your system down.

    You can choose to rethink that strategy, adjust their configuration
    options or choose to live with the performance hit.

    We can find out everything for sure with a program called Autoruns and
    then decide what to do without using trial and
    error methods. Autoruns will show you all the things you see in the
    XP msconfig tool and more.

    Autoruns is like the XP msconfig tool on steroids.

    Autoruns installs nothing and runs on demand. It will show you things
    about your system you
    will not see using other tools. Autoruns is safe and will not
    uninstall any applications or programs on
    your system when you disable them. It just lets you control the
    startup of the programs.

    Download Autoruns from here:

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb963902.aspx

    Save Autoruns on your system and launch it. When Autoruns finishes
    scanning your system, it
    will say Ready in the lower left corner of the screen.

    You will be looking at the Everything tab which lists every startup
    item. It can be a little
    intimidating to see all that stuff, so narrow things down a bit.

    Click the Logon tab. Under Options, you may can choose to Hide
    Microsoft and Windows Entries
    so you will only see the items that do not belong to Microsoft or
    Windows. Usually that means
    you installed them. Be sure to Refresh (F5) when you make any
    changes.

    You can see the startup items for your logged in user and there are a
    lot of things, but some
    of the entries are not very interesting at the moment.

    In the Logon tab, the entries of interest are:

    The Local Machine startup items (HKLM):

    HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run


    The Current User startup items (HKCU):

    HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run


    The Startup folder for the currently logged in user. For user Jose,
    that would be:

    C:/Documents and Settings\Jose\Start Menu\Programs\Startup


    On my system, those three items are completely empty. That may not be
    practical for everybody,
    but it certainly possible.

    You can choose to disable startup items using Autoruns and enable them
    again later if something
    goes wrong.

    You can also choose to delete startup items using Autoruns when you
    are sure they can be safely
    deleted. Leftover undeleted items will not slow your system down
    since they are not loading, but
    they can be annoying to look at.

    Everything with a checkbox is a startup item that you can manipulate.
    Every checkbox with a green
    check is an enabled startup item. You can decide if you need the
    startup item enabled or not
    (perhaps just by looking at it) and if you are not sure what it is,
    right click the item and choose
    to Search Online.

    Here is one place on the Internet to research individual startup
    items:

    http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/filedb/

    If you uncheck an item it is only disabled from starting. It is not
    deleted from the startup
    list until you actually choose to delete it. You can always come back
    and enable the item again.

    Autoruns does not uninstall any programs. Any changes will take
    effect the next time you reboot.

    After making changes, reboot and see if you have any new issues that
    you can identify as
    a result of the changes or if things are better and react
    appropriately.

    Consider taking some notes while making your changes so you can know
    how to undo things if a
    problem comes up afterwards. Try not to get confused by making too
    many changes at once.

    Reboot your system once in a while during the adjustments to see how
    things are going. You can
    always make more adjustments or undo things later.

    You can use this same strategy using the Autoruns Services tab. You
    can look at all the Services
    or just the non Microsoft services by clicking Options and choose to
    hide Microsoft and Windows
    Entries and refresh (F5) the list.

    You will see all the extra non Microsoft services that are configured
    on your system and can decide what
    action to take. It is possible to have zero non Microsoft services on
    some configurations.

    There is an Internet site that has a lot of information about Windows
    Services, what they do and
    if they can be disabled here:

    http://www.blackviper.com/

    You can use many methods of timing the system startup before and after
    times to see what the adjustments do. There is no guessing. This way
    you will know with certainty if things are better or worse and not
    just be thinking things are a little better, maybe better, seems a
    little faster, might be faster or not really sure...
     
  6. PA Bear [MS MVP]

    PA Bear [MS MVP] Flightless Bird

    Help! My computer is slow!
    http://miekiemoes.blogspot.com/2008/02/help-my-computer-is-slow.html


    PSRumbagh wrote:
    > It takes about 4 minutes for my Compaq V2000 laptop to boot-up using WinXP
    > Home with SP3. NORMAL boot-up invokes 58 processes, 107 services, 489
    > modules, 215 drivers , 25 startup and 29 IP connections. SAFE MODE boot-up
    > invokes 12 processes, 107 services, 158 modules, 215 drivers, 25 startup
    > and
    > 0 IP connections. I am certain that many of the normal boot-up items are
    > loaded for programs that I scarcely use. How do I figure out which of the
    > normal boot up items is really needed and which are not needed? If I turn
    > off a truely needed program in the Start Up folder can I do damage to my
    > PC?
     
  7. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 10:55:01 -0800, PSRumbagh
    <PSRumbagh@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    > It takes about 4 minutes for my Compaq V2000 laptop to boot-up using WinXP
    > Home with SP3. NORMAL boot-up invokes 58 processes, 107 services, 489
    > modules, 215 drivers , 25 startup and 29 IP connections. SAFE MODE boot-up
    > invokes 12 processes, 107 services, 158 modules, 215 drivers, 25 startup and
    > 0 IP connections. I am certain that many of the normal boot-up items are
    > loaded for programs that I scarcely use. How do I figure out which of the
    > normal boot up items is really needed and which are not needed? If I turn
    > off a truely needed program in the Start Up folder can I do damage to my PC?




    My personal view is that the attention many people pay to how long it
    takes to boot is unwarranted. Assuming that the computer's speed is
    otherwise satisfactory, it is not generally worth worrying about. Most
    people start their computers once a day or even less frequently. In
    the overall scheme of things, even a few minutes to start up isn't
    very important. Personally I power on my computer when I get up in the
    morning, then go get my coffee. When I come back, it's done booting. I
    don't know how long it took to boot and I don't care.

    However if you do want to address it, it may be because of what
    programs start automatically, and you may want to stop some of them
    from starting that way. On each program you don't want to start
    automatically, check its Options to see if it has the choice not to
    start (make sure you actually choose the option not to run it, not
    just a "don't show icon" option). Many can easily and best be stopped
    that way. If that doesn't work, run MSCONFIG from the Start | Run
    line, and on the Startup tab, uncheck the programs you don't want to
    start automatically.

    However, if I were you, I wouldn't do this just for the purpose of
    running the minimum number of programs. Despite what many people tell
    you, you should be concerned, not with how *many* of these programs
    you run, but *which*. Some of them can hurt performance severely, but
    others have no effect on performance.

    Don't just stop programs from running willy-nilly. What you should do
    is determine what each program is, what its value is to you, and what
    the cost in performance is of its running all the time. You can get
    more information about these with google searches and asking about
    specifics here.

    Once you have that information, you can make an intelligent informed
    decision about what you want to keep and what you want to get rid of.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  8. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    VanguardLH wrote:

    > PSRumbagh wrote:
    >
    >> It takes about 4 minutes for my Compaq V2000 laptop to boot-up using WinXP
    >> Home with SP3. NORMAL boot-up invokes 58 processes, 107 services, 489
    >> modules, 215 drivers , 25 startup and 29 IP connections. SAFE MODE boot-up
    >> invokes 12 processes, 107 services, 158 modules, 215 drivers, 25 startup and
    >> 0 IP connections. I am certain that many of the normal boot-up items are
    >> loaded for programs that I scarcely use. How do I figure out which of the
    >> normal boot up items is really needed and which are not needed? If I turn
    >> off a truely needed program in the Start Up folder can I do damage to my PC?

    >
    > Why does your host create any [permanent] IP connections when you startup
    > Windows? You have a lot of mapped drives? If so, each one times time to
    > renegotiate a new connection.


    Also, do you really need to shutdown Windows? Why not hibernate it? That
    also removes power but you boot back into the memory image you were using
    before instead of having to load all the programs again.
     
  9. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Jan 31, 2:34 pm, "Ken Blake, MVP"
    <kbl...@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote:
    > On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 10:55:01 -0800, PSRumbagh
    >
    > <PSRumb...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > > It takes about 4 minutes for my Compaq V2000 laptop to boot-up using WinXP
    > > Home with SP3.  NORMAL boot-up invokes 58 processes, 107 services, 489
    > > modules, 215 drivers , 25 startup and 29 IP connections. SAFE MODE boot-up
    > > invokes 12 processes, 107 services, 158 modules, 215 drivers, 25 startup and
    > > 0 IP connections.  I am certain that many of the normal boot-up itemsare
    > > loaded for programs that I scarcely use.  How do I figure out which of the
    > > normal boot up items is really needed and which are not needed?  If Iturn
    > > off a truely needed program in the Start Up folder can I do damage to my PC?

    >
    > My personal view is that the attention many people pay to how long it
    > takes to boot is unwarranted. Assuming that the computer's speed is
    > otherwise satisfactory, it is not generally worth worrying about. Most
    > people start their computers once a day or even less frequently. In
    > the overall scheme of things, even a few minutes to start up isn't
    > very important. Personally I power on my computer when I get up in the
    > morning, then go get my coffee. When I come back, it's done booting. I
    > don't know how long it took to boot and I don't care.
    >
    > However if you do want to address it, it may be because of what
    > programs start automatically, and you may want to stop some of them
    > from starting that way. On each program you don't want to start
    > automatically, check its Options to see if it has the choice not to
    > start (make sure you actually choose the option not to run it, not
    > just a "don't show icon" option). Many can easily and best be stopped
    > that way. If that doesn't work, run MSCONFIG from the Start | Run
    > line, and on the Startup tab, uncheck the programs you don't want to
    > start automatically.
    >
    > However, if I were you, I wouldn't do this just for the purpose of
    > running the minimum number of programs. Despite what many people tell
    > you, you should be concerned, not with how *many* of these programs
    > you run, but *which*. Some of them can hurt performance severely, but
    > others have no effect on performance.
    >
    > Don't just stop programs from running willy-nilly. What you should do
    > is determine what each program is, what its value is to you, and what
    > the cost in performance is of its running all the time. You can get
    > more information about these with google searches and asking about
    > specifics here.
    >
    > Once you have that information, you can make an intelligent informed
    > decision about what you want to keep and what you want to get rid of.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > Please Reply to the Newsgroup


    If you can get paid for analyzing a boot time from ntkrnlpa.exe to an
    agreed upon definition of finished (accompanied by a log file of
    actual timings) and then charge a fixed amount - say $1 - for every
    second you knock off the time, it quickly gets important!

    If somebody says their system takes too long to boot, please fix it, I
    will first determine with certainty exactly how long is "too long" and
    make the adjustments that do not compromise their intended use of the
    system or their security (etc.) and will never use a trial and error
    method.

    It usually only takes a scant few minutes to get at least a 50%
    reduction on a lot of systems once you agree on what finished booting
    means. The rest is gravy.

    There is no trial and error, disabling of "some programs", suggested
    things to disable with no method, etc. as we often see suggested.
    Figure out where every second is going and reduce it if you can. No
    guessing.

    I too am a hibernator, but it sometimes only takes one bad experience
    to put the fear in people.
     

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