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folder sharing

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by dave_140390@hotmail.com, Apr 22, 2010.

  1. dave_140390@hotmail.com

    dave_140390@hotmail.com Flightless Bird

    Hi,

    I have two computers at home: one PC with Windows XP Professional,
    another PC with Windows 7 Home Premium. Both PCs are connected to my
    ISP's cable modem via a switch.

    I would like to share a folder on Windows XP so Windows 7 could read
    the files in that folder.

    I have shared the directory on Windows XP to "Everyone". A hand
    appears under the shared folder, so sharing seems to work.

    The question is now:
    How do I access the shared folder from Windows 7?

    In Windows 7's, under File Manager's "Network", I can see only Windows
    7 itself, not Windows XP.

    -- dave
     
  2. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    dave_140390@hotmail.com wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have two computers at home: one PC with Windows XP Professional,
    > another PC with Windows 7 Home Premium. Both PCs are connected to my
    > ISP's cable modem via a switch.
    >
    > I would like to share a folder on Windows XP so Windows 7 could read
    > the files in that folder.
    >
    > I have shared the directory on Windows XP to "Everyone". A hand
    > appears under the shared folder, so sharing seems to work.
    >
    > The question is now:
    > How do I access the shared folder from Windows 7?
    >
    > In Windows 7's, under File Manager's "Network", I can see only Windows
    > 7 itself, not Windows XP.
    >
    > -- dave


    Connected via "a switch"?

    You have to create a network between the 2 computers. Perhaps you have.
    You present too little information to tell. See:
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/...mputers-running-different-versions-of-Windows

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
  3. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    <dave_140390@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3160fab3-a43e-4f2e-ba22-0a4cf9f0c639@k36g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have two computers at home: one PC with Windows XP Professional,
    > another PC with Windows 7 Home Premium. Both PCs are connected to my
    > ISP's cable modem via a switch.
    >
    > I would like to share a folder on Windows XP so Windows 7 could read
    > the files in that folder.
    >
    > I have shared the directory on Windows XP to "Everyone". A hand
    > appears under the shared folder, so sharing seems to work.
    >
    > The question is now:
    > How do I access the shared folder from Windows 7?
    >
    > In Windows 7's, under File Manager's "Network", I can see only Windows
    > 7 itself, not Windows XP.
    >
    > -- dave


    - Can you ping the WinXP PC from the Windows 7 PC?
    - Dooes your Windows 7 logon account/password match a WinXP
    account/password?
    - What do you see when you type this command at the Windows 7 Command
    Prompt:
    net use Q: "\\WinXPName\ShareName"
     
  4. dave_140390@hotmail.com

    dave_140390@hotmail.com Flightless Bird

    On Apr 23, 12:50 am, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:
    > dave_140...@hotmail.com wrote:
    > > Hi,

    >
    > > I have two computers at home: one PC with Windows XP Professional,
    > > another PC with Windows 7 Home Premium. Both PCs are connected to my
    > > ISP's cable modem via a switch.

    >
    > > I would like to share a folder on Windows XP so Windows 7 could read
    > > the files in that folder.

    >
    > > I have shared the directory on Windows XP to "Everyone". A hand
    > > appears under the shared folder, so sharing seems to work.

    >
    > > The question is now:
    > > How do I access the shared folder from Windows 7?

    >
    > > In Windows 7's, under File Manager's "Network", I can see only Windows
    > > 7 itself, not Windows XP.

    >
    > > -- dave

    >
    > Connected via "a switch"?


    Yes.


    > You have to create a network between the 2 computers. Perhaps you have.
    > You present too little information to tell.


    Really? Well:
    * the switch is connected to the IPS's cable modem with an Ethernet
    cable
    * each of the two PCs is connected to the switch with an Ethernet
    cable

    The switch is D-Link DES-1005D.

    Each of the PCs can access the Internet with this setup.

    -- dave
     
  5. dave_140390@hotmail.com

    dave_140390@hotmail.com Flightless Bird

    Hi,

    Thanks for your help. Here are the answers to your questions:


    > - Can you ping the WinXP PC from the Windows 7 PC?


    I can:

    C:/>ping 192.168.0.2

    Pinging 192.168.0.2 with 32 bytes of data:
    Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

    Ping statistics for 192.168.0.2:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 0ms

    C:/>


    > - Dooes your Windows 7 logon account/password match a WinXP
    > account/password?


    No.


    > - What do you see when you type this command at the Windows 7 Command
    > Prompt:
    > net use Q: "\\WinXPName\ShareName"


    I am not sure what the correct syntax of this command would be. Given
    that I share directory C:/foo in the WinXP PC, should I enter:

    net use Q: "\\WinXPName\foo"

    or:

    net use Q: "\\WinXPName\c\foo"

    or one of the above without quotes?

    I tried all 4 syntaxes above, with the same result:

    An attempt was made to logon, but the network logon service was not
    started.

    -- dave
     
  6. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    <dave_140390@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:dbd7aa81-223f-4179-90f4-a0375e5c9ead@y17g2000yqd.googlegroups.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Thanks for your help. Here are the answers to your questions:
    >
    >
    >> - Can you ping the WinXP PC from the Windows 7 PC?

    >
    > I can:
    >
    > C:/>ping 192.168.0.2
    >
    > Pinging 192.168.0.2 with 32 bytes of data:
    > Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128
    > Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    > Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    > Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    >
    > Ping statistics for 192.168.0.2:
    > Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    > Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    > Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 0ms
    >
    > C:/>
    >
    >
    >> - Dooes your Windows 7 logon account/password match a WinXP
    >> account/password?

    >
    > No.
    >
    >
    >> - What do you see when you type this command at the Windows 7 Command
    >> Prompt:
    >> net use Q: "\\WinXPName\ShareName"

    >
    > I am not sure what the correct syntax of this command would be. Given
    > that I share directory C:/foo in the WinXP PC, should I enter:
    >
    > net use Q: "\\WinXPName\foo"
    >
    > or:
    >
    > net use Q: "\\WinXPName\c\foo"
    >
    > or one of the above without quotes?
    >
    > I tried all 4 syntaxes above, with the same result:
    >
    > An attempt was made to logon, but the network logon service was not
    > started.
    >
    > -- dave


    The syntax of the "net share" command is as I gave it before:

    net use Q: "\\WinXPName\ShareName"

    Instead of "WinXPName" you must specify the NetBIOS name of your Windows XP
    PC. You see it when you type this at the Command Prompt:
    set computername

    Instead of "ShareName" you must specify the name of the share that you
    created (which could be different from the folder name that it refers to).
    You can see all current share names when you tape this at the Command
    Prompt:
    net share

    You should then post exactly what you see on the screen.
     
  7. sanjacstudent12

    sanjacstudent12 Flightless Bird

    Windows 7 offers a network wizard you can use to set up a homegroup. It is
    in the Network and Sharing Center, at the bottom. If you haven't consciously
    set up a network, use "Set up a new connection or network." Otherwise, try
    the "Connect to a network" or "Choose homegroup and sharing options" links.


    "dave_140390@hotmail.com" wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Thanks for your help. Here are the answers to your questions:
    >
    >
    > > - Can you ping the WinXP PC from the Windows 7 PC?

    >
    > I can:
    >
    > C:/>ping 192.168.0.2
    >
    > Pinging 192.168.0.2 with 32 bytes of data:
    > Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128
    > Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    > Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    > Reply from 192.168.0.2: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
    >
    > Ping statistics for 192.168.0.2:
    > Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    > Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    > Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 0ms
    >
    > C:/>
    >
    >
    > > - Dooes your Windows 7 logon account/password match a WinXP
    > > account/password?

    >
    > No.
    >
    >
    > > - What do you see when you type this command at the Windows 7 Command
    > > Prompt:
    > > net use Q: "\\WinXPName\ShareName"

    >
    > I am not sure what the correct syntax of this command would be. Given
    > that I share directory C:/foo in the WinXP PC, should I enter:
    >
    > net use Q: "\\WinXPName\foo"
    >
    > or:
    >
    > net use Q: "\\WinXPName\c\foo"
    >
    > or one of the above without quotes?
    >
    > I tried all 4 syntaxes above, with the same result:
    >
    > An attempt was made to logon, but the network logon service was not
    > started.
    >
    > -- dave
    > .
    >
     
  8. kristain via WindowsKB.com

    kristain via WindowsKB.com Flightless Bird

    Sharing folders between two Windows 7 machines with the new HomeGroup feature
    is an easy process, but the HomeGroup feature is not compatible with XP.
    First make sure both machines are members of the same Workgroup which by
    default is named Workgroup.

    workgroup

    On the Windows 7 machine go into Control Panel \ All Control Panel Items \
    Network and Sharing Center then click on Change advanced sharing settings.

    network and sharing

    advanced

    You will want to verify the following settings under Advanced Sharing
    Settings for the Home or Work and Public profile.

    home or work settings

    If you want any user to have access the public shares turn off password
    protection. This is located in Advanced Sharing Settings toward the bottom
    of the list.

    turn off pw

    If you want to keep it enabled make sure there is a log in account for the
    other XP machines and they have a password.

    create pw

    Now if you go into Network in Windows 7 you should see your XP machine and
    the Windows 7 as well which in this case is Mysticgeek-PC.

    Explorer

    To share the printer on the Windows 7 machine go into Devices and Printers
    from the Start menu and double click on the printer icon.

    devices

    Next double click on “Customize your printerâ€.

    1 Printer

    In the Properties screen click on the Sharing Tab and check the box to share
    the printer and type in its share name.

    2 printer share

    If your XP machine is an x86 OS you can install Additional Drivers before
    setting up the XP machine.

    3 Printer add drivers

    To find the shared folders and devices double click on the Windows 7 machine
    icon under Network. Here you can see the printer connected to my Windows 7
    machine is shared and also the Users Folder.

    shared device and users

    Continue into the Users folder and Public to see the shared folders, here I
    also created a folder called XP Share just to keep everything in central
    location.

    xpshare

    Over on your XP machine open up My Network Places to find the Windows 7
    (mysticgeek-pc) shared folder.

    My Network Places

    Double click on the Share folder to find a list of shared folders in the
    Public folder on Windows 7. If you have password protection enabled you will
    need to type in the username and password of the user account on the Windows
    7 machine first.

    folders

    Setup XP With Shared Printer

    To set up the shared printer in XP you will need to go into Printers and
    Faxes from the Start menu and kick off the Add Printer Wizard.

    add Printer

    Now select “A network printer, or a printer attached to another computerâ€
    then hit Next.

    network option

    Next select “Connect to this printer…†and type in the path for the printer
    connected to the Windows 7 machine and click next.

    print

    Now click Yes to the confirmation message.

    confirm msg

    Then click Finish the printer to install and complete the Wizard.

    Complete

    In some cases you will need to install the x86 XP drivers for the shared
    printer because the Windows 7 drivers are not compatible with XP. When
    everything is installed open up Printers and Faxes to find the shared printer.


    in explorer

    This should help you get started with sharing your files and other devices
    with your Windows 7 machine. When I first started I was able to see the
    printer on XP right away because I had a HomeGroup set up, but once I deleted
    it I needed to share the printer like you would for a workgroup. You might
    also have to do a couple restarts of the XP machine for it to see the shared
    resources on Windows 7.

    --
    Message posted via http://www.windowskb.com
     
  9. dave_140390@hotmail.com

    dave_140390@hotmail.com Flightless Bird

    Hi,

    > The syntax of the "net share" command is as I gave it before:
    >
    > net use Q: "\\WinXPName\ShareName"
    >
    > Instead of "WinXPName" you must specify the NetBIOS name of your Windows XP
    > PC. You see it when you type this at the Command Prompt:
    > set computername
    >
    > Instead of "ShareName" you must specify the name of the share that you
    > created (which could be different from the folder name that it refers to).
    > You can see all current share names when you tape this at the Command
    > Prompt:
    > net share
    >
    > You should then post exactly what you see on the screen.


    I should have told that I did use the real computer name instead of
    "WinXPName".

    The session on Windows 7 is as follows:

    <session>

    C:/>net use Q: "\\<COMPUTERNAME>\<share_name>"
    System error 1792 has occurred.

    An attempt was made to logon, but the network logon service was not
    started.


    C:/>

    </session>

    (with "<COMPUTERNAME>" equal to the XP computer name, and
    "<share_name>" equal to the name of the share that I want to share)

    -- dave
     
  10. dave_140390@hotmail.com

    dave_140390@hotmail.com Flightless Bird

    On Apr 23, 8:37 am, sanjacstudent12
    <sanjacstuden...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > Windows 7 offers a network wizard you can use to set up a homegroup.


    As far as I know, homegroups do not work on Windows XP.

    -- dave
     
  11. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 23 Apr 2010 07:09:15 -0700 (PDT), dave_140390@hotmail.com
    wrote:

    > On Apr 23, 8:37 am, sanjacstudent12
    > <sanjacstuden...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > > Windows 7 offers a network wizard you can use to set up a homegroup.

    >
    > As far as I know, homegroups do not work on Windows XP.




    That's correct. They only work with Windows 7 computers.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  12. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    dave_140390@hotmail.com wrote:
    > On Apr 23, 12:50 am, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:
    >> dave_140...@hotmail.com wrote:
    >>> Hi,
    >>> I have two computers at home: one PC with Windows XP Professional,
    >>> another PC with Windows 7 Home Premium. Both PCs are connected to my
    >>> ISP's cable modem via a switch.
    >>> I would like to share a folder on Windows XP so Windows 7 could read
    >>> the files in that folder.
    >>> I have shared the directory on Windows XP to "Everyone". A hand
    >>> appears under the shared folder, so sharing seems to work.
    >>> The question is now:
    >>> How do I access the shared folder from Windows 7?
    >>> In Windows 7's, under File Manager's "Network", I can see only Windows
    >>> 7 itself, not Windows XP.
    >>> -- dave

    >> Connected via "a switch"?

    >
    > Yes.
    >
    >
    >> You have to create a network between the 2 computers. Perhaps you have.
    >> You present too little information to tell.

    >
    > Really? Well:
    > * the switch is connected to the IPS's cable modem with an Ethernet
    > cable
    > * each of the two PCs is connected to the switch with an Ethernet
    > cable
    >
    > The switch is D-Link DES-1005D.
    >
    > Each of the PCs can access the Internet with this setup.
    >
    > -- dave


    Many people confuse the terms "switch," "hub," and "router," all of
    which do different things. Your DES-1005D is indeed a switch -- and it's
    connected to your cable modem which undoubtedly is also a router.

    Terminology aside, did you read the information at the link I posted,
    which explains in detail how to set up a network between a computer
    running Windows 7 and a computer running XP?

    The "System error 1792" is a bit unusual. That error indicates that the
    "Net Logon Service" did not start. Despite the way the name of that
    service sounds, it is used for *Domain* authentication when you log into
    the domain. You shouldn't have a domain.

    On the XP box
    - right click "My Computer" and select Properties
    - click the "Computer Name" tab
    - ensure that the computer is in a Workgroup and not a Domain. If
    necessary, click the "Change" button and ensure that the radio button
    next to "Workgroup" is selected.
    - write down the Workgroup name

    On the Win 7 box
    - right click "My Computer" and select Properties
    - The workgroup name is displayed under Computer name, domain, and
    workgroup settings.
    - ensure that the workgroup name is the same as on the XP box. You can
    change either computer.

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
  13. dave_140390@hotmail.com

    dave_140390@hotmail.com Flightless Bird

    Hi,

    > On the XP box
    > - right click "My Computer" and select Properties
    > - click the "Computer Name" tab
    > - ensure that the computer is in a Workgroup and not a Domain. If
    > necessary, click the "Change" button and ensure that the radio button
    > next to "Workgroup" is selected.
    > - write down the Workgroup name


    I think you found a problem: my XP computer (which my company lends
    me) is in a domain, not in a workgroup. And the "Change..." button is
    greyed, so it seems that I can't put my XP computer in a workgroup.

    Now, do you know if there is a way to enable the "Change..." button?
    Perhaps by tweaking the registry?

    Note that I do have admin rights.

    -- dave
     
  14. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    news:eHmK7Vw4KHA.4520@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > dave_140390@hotmail.com wrote:
    >> On Apr 23, 12:50 am, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:
    >>> dave_140...@hotmail.com wrote:
    >>>> Hi,
    >>>> I have two computers at home: one PC with Windows XP Professional,
    >>>> another PC with Windows 7 Home Premium. Both PCs are connected to my
    >>>> ISP's cable modem via a switch.
    >>>> I would like to share a folder on Windows XP so Windows 7 could read
    >>>> the files in that folder.
    >>>> I have shared the directory on Windows XP to "Everyone". A hand
    >>>> appears under the shared folder, so sharing seems to work.
    >>>> The question is now:
    >>>> How do I access the shared folder from Windows 7?
    >>>> In Windows 7's, under File Manager's "Network", I can see only Windows
    >>>> 7 itself, not Windows XP.
    >>>> -- dave
    >>> Connected via "a switch"?

    >>
    >> Yes.
    >>
    >>
    >>> You have to create a network between the 2 computers. Perhaps you have.
    >>> You present too little information to tell.

    >>
    >> Really? Well:
    >> * the switch is connected to the IPS's cable modem with an Ethernet
    >> cable
    >> * each of the two PCs is connected to the switch with an Ethernet
    >> cable
    >>
    >> The switch is D-Link DES-1005D.
    >>
    >> Each of the PCs can access the Internet with this setup.
    >>
    >> -- dave

    >
    > Many people confuse the terms "switch," "hub," and "router," all of which
    > do different things. Your DES-1005D is indeed a switch -- and it's
    > connected to your cable modem which undoubtedly is also a router.
    >
    > Lem


    Is there room for doubt? My cable modem ist just this, a modem, and it
    requires a separate router in order to provide the hardware firewall
    functionality that I insist on.
     
  15. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >
    >
    > "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    > news:eHmK7Vw4KHA.4520@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >> dave_140390@hotmail.com wrote:
    >>> On Apr 23, 12:50 am, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:
    >>>> dave_140...@hotmail.com wrote:
    >>>>> Hi,
    >>>>> I have two computers at home: one PC with Windows XP Professional,
    >>>>> another PC with Windows 7 Home Premium. Both PCs are connected to my
    >>>>> ISP's cable modem via a switch.
    >>>>> I would like to share a folder on Windows XP so Windows 7 could read
    >>>>> the files in that folder.
    >>>>> I have shared the directory on Windows XP to "Everyone". A hand
    >>>>> appears under the shared folder, so sharing seems to work.
    >>>>> The question is now:
    >>>>> How do I access the shared folder from Windows 7?
    >>>>> In Windows 7's, under File Manager's "Network", I can see only Windows
    >>>>> 7 itself, not Windows XP.
    >>>>> -- dave
    >>>> Connected via "a switch"?
    >>>
    >>> Yes.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> You have to create a network between the 2 computers. Perhaps you have.
    >>>> You present too little information to tell.
    >>>
    >>> Really? Well:
    >>> * the switch is connected to the IPS's cable modem with an Ethernet
    >>> cable
    >>> * each of the two PCs is connected to the switch with an Ethernet
    >>> cable
    >>>
    >>> The switch is D-Link DES-1005D.
    >>>
    >>> Each of the PCs can access the Internet with this setup.
    >>>
    >>> -- dave

    >>
    >> Many people confuse the terms "switch," "hub," and "router," all of
    >> which do different things. Your DES-1005D is indeed a switch -- and
    >> it's connected to your cable modem which undoubtedly is also a router.
    >>
    >> Lem

    >
    > Is there room for doubt? My cable modem ist just this, a modem, and it
    > requires a separate router in order to provide the hardware firewall
    > functionality that I insist on.


    Yes, there is room for doubt.

    But *something* assigned at least one of his computers an IP address of
    192.168.0.2. It's my understanding that if you connected your computer
    directly to your cable modem (which as you point out has security
    disadvantages), your computer would receive its IP address from the
    ISP's headend, and it would be a public IP address (i.e., not
    192.168.x.y).

    But having to guess like this is why my first response was that the OP
    had not provided sufficient information.
    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
  16. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    news:uQ7l2Jy4KHA.4264@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    >> news:eHmK7Vw4KHA.4520@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    >>> dave_140390@hotmail.com wrote:
    >>>> On Apr 23, 12:50 am, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:
    >>>>> dave_140...@hotmail.com wrote:
    >>>>>> Hi,
    >>>>>> I have two computers at home: one PC with Windows XP Professional,
    >>>>>> another PC with Windows 7 Home Premium. Both PCs are connected to my
    >>>>>> ISP's cable modem via a switch.
    >>>>>> I would like to share a folder on Windows XP so Windows 7 could read
    >>>>>> the files in that folder.
    >>>>>> I have shared the directory on Windows XP to "Everyone". A hand
    >>>>>> appears under the shared folder, so sharing seems to work.
    >>>>>> The question is now:
    >>>>>> How do I access the shared folder from Windows 7?
    >>>>>> In Windows 7's, under File Manager's "Network", I can see only
    >>>>>> Windows
    >>>>>> 7 itself, not Windows XP.
    >>>>>> -- dave
    >>>>> Connected via "a switch"?
    >>>>
    >>>> Yes.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> You have to create a network between the 2 computers. Perhaps you
    >>>>> have.
    >>>>> You present too little information to tell.
    >>>>
    >>>> Really? Well:
    >>>> * the switch is connected to the IPS's cable modem with an Ethernet
    >>>> cable
    >>>> * each of the two PCs is connected to the switch with an Ethernet
    >>>> cable
    >>>>
    >>>> The switch is D-Link DES-1005D.
    >>>>
    >>>> Each of the PCs can access the Internet with this setup.
    >>>>
    >>>> -- dave
    >>>
    >>> Many people confuse the terms "switch," "hub," and "router," all of
    >>> which do different things. Your DES-1005D is indeed a switch -- and it's
    >>> connected to your cable modem which undoubtedly is also a router.
    >>>
    >>> Lem

    >>
    >> Is there room for doubt? My cable modem ist just this, a modem, and it
    >> requires a separate router in order to provide the hardware firewall
    >> functionality that I insist on.

    >
    > Yes, there is room for doubt.
    >
    > But *something* assigned at least one of his computers an IP address of
    > 192.168.0.2. It's my understanding that if you connected your computer
    > directly to your cable modem (which as you point out has security
    > disadvantages), your computer would receive its IP address from the ISP's
    > headend, and it would be a public IP address (i.e., not 192.168.x.y).
    >
    > Lem


    I fully agree.
     
  17. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    dave_140390@hotmail.com wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    >> On the XP box
    >> - right click "My Computer" and select Properties
    >> - click the "Computer Name" tab
    >> - ensure that the computer is in a Workgroup and not a Domain. If
    >> necessary, click the "Change" button and ensure that the radio button
    >> next to "Workgroup" is selected.
    >> - write down the Workgroup name

    >
    > I think you found a problem: my XP computer (which my company lends
    > me) is in a domain, not in a workgroup. And the "Change..." button is
    > greyed, so it seems that I can't put my XP computer in a workgroup.
    >
    > Now, do you know if there is a way to enable the "Change..." button?
    > Perhaps by tweaking the registry?
    >
    > Note that I do have admin rights.
    >
    > -- dave


    The issue isn't enabling the button, but the problem of sharing files
    between a computer in a domain and a computer in a workgroup.

    I don't know enough about domains (or Windows 7) to give you a
    definitive answer, but my best guess is the following:

    It sounds as if you are logging onto to your company XP computer using
    your cached domain credentials. What you want to do is to log on as a
    local user.

    If you don't have a local user account, see:
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Create-a-user-account

    Once you've logged in to the XP box as a local user, you may have
    problems accessing the Internet. If so, change the workgroup name to be
    the same as the domain name.

    Whether you leave the workgroup at its default or change it to be the
    same as the domain name, you'll probably have to change the Win 7
    computer's workgroup to match.
    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
  18. dave_140390@hotmail.com

    dave_140390@hotmail.com Flightless Bird

    Hi Lem,

    Thank you for the advice.


    > If you don't have a local user account, see:
    > http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Create-a-user-account


    I added a (local?) user with Control Panel -> Administrative Tools ->
    Computer Management -> Local Users and Groups -> Users -> <right
    click> -> New User...


    > Once you've logged in to the XP box as a local user, you may have
    > problems accessing the Internet. If so, change the workgroup name to be
    > the same as the domain name.


    I logged off: Start -> Shut Down... -> Log off <my current username>.

    Then, I logged on as the (local?) user I had just created, by using
    <my_computer_name> as the domain.

    I did not have problems accessing the Internet as this (local?) user.
    At least my browser works fine.


    > Whether you leave the workgroup at its default or change it to be the
    > same as the domain name, you'll probably have to change the Win 7
    > computer's workgroup to match.


    What is the workgroup of the (local?) user I just created? How do I
    determine it? Note that when I logged as the local user, the system
    was asking also for a domain. Does this mean that I am not in a
    workgroup (from http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/How-is-a-network-at-home-different-from-one-at-work,
    I understand that a computer is either part of a domain or of a
    workgroup, but not both)?


    -- dave
     

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