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Finding a mislabeled .jpeg file

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Goomba, Aug 7, 2010.

  1. Goomba

    Goomba Flightless Bird

    Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The extension
    could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    labeled? Thank you,
     
  2. Spamlet

    Spamlet Flightless Bird

    "Goomba" <Goomba@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:7B4D9BEA-A671-44D3-9E8B-332C751FB7B0@microsoft.com...
    > Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The
    > extension
    > could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    > there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    > labeled? Thank you,


    Just search for big files. The big one without a video extension is your
    mislabelled file.

    S
     
  3. VanguardLH

    VanguardLH Flightless Bird

    Goomba wrote:

    > Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it.


    JPEG is a picture format, not a video format.

    > The extension could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is
    > now unknown.


    ..doc files are documents typically composed using Word. .txt files are
    plain text files. Neither are pictures or videos. Documents aren't
    usually much over 5-20 KB in size. Videos will be MUCH larger, like in
    the many-megabyte range, or higher.

    > Is there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may
    > be labeled?


    Have you yet even tried using the file search included in Windows?
    Search on all files but enter something for the Size criteria, like
    200KB (or whatever you might think is the size of this mislabelled
    file). Videos can be megabytes to even gigabytes in size. You didn't
    explain the nature of the missing video file, like if you recorded 60
    seconds using a digital camera, downloaded it from the Net, converted it
    from a tape or DVD movie, or what. You might want to start searching
    for files above 20,000 KB (20M8) and then progressively lower the size
    if the prior search doesn't find your mislabelled file.
     
  4. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Goomba wrote:
    > Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The extension
    > could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    > there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    > labeled? Thank you,


    It is possible to get info on files. I have two programs here
    that may be useful. One is specifically for movies, and if you're working
    with movies, that is the program to use. The other is general purpose,
    but may not do as good a job identifying movie types.

    *******

    For video (like MJPEG a.k.a Motion JPEG), you can use GSPOT.
    It has a batch mode, which allows dragging and dropping a handful
    of files on the window at one time, and the "export" file will
    have printed in it, what the files are.

    http://gspot.headbands.com/

    http://gspot.headbands.com/v26x/GSpot270a.zip (download)

    For general file identification, first consider which OSes use
    extensions and which do not. Windows is pretty dependent on
    extensions. Linux and Unix don't depend on the extension.
    Instead, Linux and Unix examine key bytes in the file
    (usually in the first 1Kbyte), and determine the file type
    that way. The operative term for the bytes they look at,
    is the "magic function".

    There is a port of the "file" program available.

    http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/

    http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/file.htm

    To get this working, you'll eventually end up with
    a folder called "bin" and in it, will be files like
    this.

    file.exe
    magic1.dll
    regex2.dll
    zlib1.dll

    If the package has an installer, it should add an entry to
    the Windows environment variable for execution "PATH". That
    way, when you type "file" at the command prompt (MSDOS window),
    the system will be able to find it. The dependencies for the
    file, must be in the folder with it, and as far as I know,
    the above list is complete.

    For me to test that at the moment, I can open a Command Prompt
    window, vopy a JPEG file into the "bin" folder, and type the name
    of the command, and see what it says. This first example, will
    print all the options the program has (--help calls up the help
    function, like /? would do for a Windows program). The second
    command example, carries out my test case.

    C:/Downloads\filetype_gnuwin32\bin> file --help
    C:/Downloads\filetype_gnuwin32\bin> file test.jpg

    test.jpg; JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01

    Now, if I renamed that test file to test.txt, the answer would
    still be the same

    C:/Downloads\filetype_gnuwin32\bin> file test.txt

    test.txt; JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01

    So the program does its determination of file type, without
    relying on the extension.

    Neither of those example utilities, is "user friendly". With
    a great deal of effort, they could be used in a script. You
    can still use them by hand, but it will take you a *long* time
    to find that file manually.

    Good luck,
    Paul
     
  5. Mike S

    Mike S Flightless Bird

    On 8/7/2010 3:56 PM, Paul wrote:
    > Goomba wrote:
    >> Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The
    >> extension could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now
    >> unknown. Is there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how
    >> they may be labeled? Thank you,

    >
    > It is possible to get info on files. I have two programs here
    > that may be useful. One is specifically for movies, and if you're working
    > with movies, that is the program to use. The other is general purpose,
    > but may not do as good a job identifying movie types.
    >
    > *******
    >
    > For video (like MJPEG a.k.a Motion JPEG), you can use GSPOT.
    > It has a batch mode, which allows dragging and dropping a handful
    > of files on the window at one time, and the "export" file will
    > have printed in it, what the files are.
    >
    > http://gspot.headbands.com/
    >
    > http://gspot.headbands.com/v26x/GSpot270a.zip (download)
    >
    > For general file identification, first consider which OSes use
    > extensions and which do not. Windows is pretty dependent on
    > extensions. Linux and Unix don't depend on the extension.
    > Instead, Linux and Unix examine key bytes in the file
    > (usually in the first 1Kbyte), and determine the file type
    > that way. The operative term for the bytes they look at,
    > is the "magic function".
    >
    > There is a port of the "file" program available.
    >
    > http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/
    >
    > http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/file.htm
    >
    > To get this working, you'll eventually end up with
    > a folder called "bin" and in it, will be files like
    > this.
    >
    > file.exe
    > magic1.dll
    > regex2.dll
    > zlib1.dll
    >
    > If the package has an installer, it should add an entry to
    > the Windows environment variable for execution "PATH". That
    > way, when you type "file" at the command prompt (MSDOS window),
    > the system will be able to find it. The dependencies for the
    > file, must be in the folder with it, and as far as I know,
    > the above list is complete.
    >
    > For me to test that at the moment, I can open a Command Prompt
    > window, vopy a JPEG file into the "bin" folder, and type the name
    > of the command, and see what it says. This first example, will
    > print all the options the program has (--help calls up the help
    > function, like /? would do for a Windows program). The second
    > command example, carries out my test case.
    >
    > C:/Downloads\filetype_gnuwin32\bin> file --help
    > C:/Downloads\filetype_gnuwin32\bin> file test.jpg
    >
    > test.jpg; JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01
    >
    > Now, if I renamed that test file to test.txt, the answer would
    > still be the same
    >
    > C:/Downloads\filetype_gnuwin32\bin> file test.txt
    >
    > test.txt; JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01
    >
    > So the program does its determination of file type, without
    > relying on the extension.
    >
    > Neither of those example utilities, is "user friendly". With
    > a great deal of effort, they could be used in a script. You
    > can still use them by hand, but it will take you a *long* time
    > to find that file manually.
    >
    > Good luck,
    > Paul


    I like XNView, freeware, great program, I just changed the extension of
    a file from .jpg to .txt and it showed a graphic thumbnail just as it
    did for the .jpg extension, no difference, XNView lets you browser
    folders and displays thumbnails for each graphics file, just another
    option.

    Mike
     
  6. Elmo

    Elmo Flightless Bird

    Goomba wrote:
    > Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The extension
    > could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    > there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    > labeled? Thank you,


    Also look for files created around the date it was mislabeled. That
    might narrow the amount of files. Then try opening any that fit: are
    familiar in name, and won't open with their current extension.

    --

    Joe =o)
     
  7. Mike S

    Mike S Flightless Bird

    On 8/7/2010 9:43 AM, Goomba wrote:
    > Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The extension
    > could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    > there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    > labeled? Thank you,


    If you know the file format, are there characters that appear inside
    every jpg file that could be searched for? I could write a free visual
    basic program that would examine every program on the hard drive and
    list the ones that included those characters, but I'm not familiar with
    the encoding and I don't know what to look for. If you can identify
    certain characters that always exist inside every jpg file let me know,
    vb's really easy to program with and this program would be a snap. I
    wrote this program, just so you can see I know vb:
    http://mscir.tripod.com/parabola/
     
  8. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Mike S wrote:
    > On 8/7/2010 9:43 AM, Goomba wrote:
    >> Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The
    >> extension
    >> could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    >> there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    >> labeled? Thank you,

    >
    > If you know the file format, are there characters that appear inside
    > every jpg file that could be searched for? I could write a free visual
    > basic program that would examine every program on the hard drive and
    > list the ones that included those characters, but I'm not familiar with
    > the encoding and I don't know what to look for. If you can identify
    > certain characters that always exist inside every jpg file let me know,
    > vb's really easy to program with and this program would be a snap. I
    > wrote this program, just so you can see I know vb:
    > http://mscir.tripod.com/parabola/


    But you have the answer already. The "file.exe" program I mentioned, has
    all the logic necessary to do the file identification for you. There
    is no need to write any more code to do the byte munging to come up
    with the answer. "file.exe" is relatively efficient, because it
    doesn't typically "eat" the whole file, to do an identification.
    In many cases, it gets the answer, using info in the first 1KB of
    the file.

    You could write a script to loop over the file system, testing for files
    that match a certain description, and print their names to an output file.

    For example, if "file test.jpg" returns

    test.jpg; JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01

    and if the user entered "JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01", your
    script could return a list of files that match the description.

    What we really need, is a positive identification of the type of
    the file that is "missing", in order that the program written
    stands a better chance of finding it. If the file is an obscure
    movie format, it might not be in the current magic file used
    by "file.exe".

    If you download the source code for the "file.exe" thing, the
    file in the source tree called "magic" is a text file you can
    open in Wordpad. You might want to add an extension of ".txt"
    on the end of the file. In that file, is a shorthand notation
    for identifying files. On Unix systems, such a file could be
    found in /etc/magic for example. In this case, the magic file
    has probably been hand rolled (with bits and pieces of ID info
    added from various sources), so the magic file may not correspond
    to a file you'd find on a Unix box.

    http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infoc...pic=/com.ibm.aix.files/doc/aixfiles/magic.htm

    "The fields of the magic file are as follows:

    1. Byte offset
    2. Value type
    3. Optional relational operator ("=" by default) and value to
    match (numeric or string constant)
    4. String to be printed

    Numeric values may be decimal, octal, or hexadecimal. Strings
    can be entered as hexadecimal values by preceding them with '0x'."

    Using the utility as it exists, eliminates having to re-invent
    the logic used in the magic identification procedure. Most of the
    hard work in this case, is in building the magic file itself, which
    has taken years.

    Paul
     
  9. Mike S

    Mike S Flightless Bird

    On 8/8/2010 1:52 AM, Paul wrote:
    > Mike S wrote:
    >> On 8/7/2010 9:43 AM, Goomba wrote:
    >>> Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The
    >>> extension
    >>> could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    >>> there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    >>> labeled? Thank you,

    >>
    >> If you know the file format, are there characters that appear inside
    >> every jpg file that could be searched for? I could write a free visual
    >> basic program that would examine every program on the hard drive and
    >> list the ones that included those characters, but I'm not familiar
    >> with the encoding and I don't know what to look for. If you can
    >> identify certain characters that always exist inside every jpg file
    >> let me know, vb's really easy to program with and this program would
    >> be a snap. I wrote this program, just so you can see I know vb:
    >> http://mscir.tripod.com/parabola/

    >
    > But you have the answer already. The "file.exe" program I mentioned, has
    > all the logic necessary to do the file identification for you. There
    > is no need to write any more code to do the byte munging to come up
    > with the answer. "file.exe" is relatively efficient, because it
    > doesn't typically "eat" the whole file, to do an identification.
    > In many cases, it gets the answer, using info in the first 1KB of
    > the file.
    >
    > You could write a script to loop over the file system, testing for files
    > that match a certain description, and print their names to an output file.
    >
    > For example, if "file test.jpg" returns
    >
    > test.jpg; JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01
    >
    > and if the user entered "JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01", your
    > script could return a list of files that match the description.
    >
    > What we really need, is a positive identification of the type of
    > the file that is "missing", in order that the program written
    > stands a better chance of finding it. If the file is an obscure
    > movie format, it might not be in the current magic file used
    > by "file.exe".
    >
    > If you download the source code for the "file.exe" thing, the
    > file in the source tree called "magic" is a text file you can
    > open in Wordpad. You might want to add an extension of ".txt"
    > on the end of the file. In that file, is a shorthand notation
    > for identifying files. On Unix systems, such a file could be
    > found in /etc/magic for example. In this case, the magic file
    > has probably been hand rolled (with bits and pieces of ID info
    > added from various sources), so the magic file may not correspond
    > to a file you'd find on a Unix box.
    >
    > http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infoc...pic=/com.ibm.aix.files/doc/aixfiles/magic.htm
    >
    >
    > "The fields of the magic file are as follows:
    >
    > 1. Byte offset
    > 2. Value type
    > 3. Optional relational operator ("=" by default) and value to
    > match (numeric or string constant)
    > 4. String to be printed
    >
    > Numeric values may be decimal, octal, or hexadecimal. Strings
    > can be entered as hexadecimal values by preceding them with '0x'."
    >
    > Using the utility as it exists, eliminates having to re-invent
    > the logic used in the magic identification procedure. Most of the
    > hard work in this case, is in building the magic file itself, which
    > has taken years.
    >
    > Paul


    Nice solution.
     
  10. News123

    News123 Flightless Bird

    On 08/07/2010 06:43 PM, Goomba wrote:
    > Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The extension
    > could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    > there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    > labeled? Thank you,


    Hi

    You got already quite some answers.

    Just a minor detail

    Up to my knowledge .jpg files are always still images.

    If you really search for a movie (done with a digital camera),
    then the file type is probably "motion jpgeg".

    Often this motion jpeg files are wrapped in an avi container.

    If you use programs like file.exe
    it might not return jpeg as file type, but only 'avi' or media
    (though I don't know the verbosity of the windows file.exe program)
     
  11. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    News123 wrote:
    > On 08/07/2010 06:43 PM, Goomba wrote:
    >> Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The extension
    >> could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    >> there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    >> labeled? Thank you,

    >
    > Hi
    >
    > You got already quite some answers.
    >
    > Just a minor detail
    >
    > Up to my knowledge .jpg files are always still images.
    >
    > If you really search for a movie (done with a digital camera),
    > then the file type is probably "motion jpgeg".
    >
    > Often this motion jpeg files are wrapped in an avi container.
    >
    > If you use programs like file.exe
    > it might not return jpeg as file type, but only 'avi' or media
    > (though I don't know the verbosity of the windows file.exe program)
    >


    Which is why GSPOT, a program specific to movie identification, might
    be a better choice for movies. I can't vouch for how complete the
    file type coverage is on file.exe . I wouldn't expect too many movie formats
    to be in there. With GSPOT's batch mode, you can dump a pile of files into
    the open window, and GSPOT writes entries to an "export" file, containing
    the specific identification information you want it to write out.
    For example, it can output identification information in a format
    you can open in a spreadsheet.

    I've never used the batch capability on GSPOT, but I think people on
    rec.video.desktop have used it occasionally.

    Paul
     
  12. thumbnail problems

    thumbnail problems Flightless Bird

    This could take a little time but put *.doc and then look through what the
    results are and then try *.txt and scroll through those results. You'll find
    it, it will just take a little dillegence on your part.

    "Goomba" wrote:

    > Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The extension
    > could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    > there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    > labeled? Thank you,
     
  13. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:i3krtc$333$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    Mike S <mscir@yahoo.com> typed:
    > On 8/7/2010 3:56 PM, Paul wrote:
    >> Goomba wrote:
    >>> Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot
    >>> find it. The extension could have been named .doc or
    >>> .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is there any way
    >>> to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    >>> labeled? Thank you,

    >>
    >> It is possible to get info on files. I have two programs
    >> here that may be useful. One is specifically for movies, and if
    >> you're working with movies, that is the program to use.
    >> The other is general purpose, but may not do as good a job
    >> identifying movie types.


    ....

    to the OP: Yes, there are. Look for file finders or duplicate file finders
    that can search based on "content" or "file contents", etc and in instead of
    the file extensions etc.. Dupliicate File Finder is one such program that
    can find identical files or just one file based on the "contents" only and
    nothing else.
    http://dff.nazrashid.com/
    Very handy IMO.

    HTH,

    Twayne`
     
  14. Goomba

    Goomba Flightless Bird

    Thank you for all the suggestions. I love seeing smart help dumb. :-]

    "Goomba" wrote:

    > Last year I mislabeled a .jpeg video and now I cannot find it. The extension
    > could have been named .doc or .txt, and the file name is now unknown. Is
    > there any way to search for .jpeg files regardless of how they may be
    > labeled? Thank you,
     

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