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Files coloured blue in Explorer

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Alain Dekker, Feb 24, 2010.

  1. Alain Dekker

    Alain Dekker Flightless Bird

    I've got a folder containing a bunch of ZIP files. When I view the list of
    files in Windows Explorer, the name of the file (and attributes like "Size"
    when viewed in Details view) are coloured blue in Explorer, some black.
    Usually all files are coloured black when I view them in Explorer. This is
    true in all the possible view styles (Thumbnail, List, etc).

    I've tried working out why by looking at the properties of the files, but
    they all look similar. Any ideas?

    Thanks,
    Alain
     
  2. Gordon

    Gordon Flightless Bird

    "Alain Dekker" <alain.dekker@NO.SPAM.loma.com> wrote in message
    news:#Vxie7TtKHA.4220@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > I've got a folder containing a bunch of ZIP files. When I view the list of
    > files in Windows Explorer, the name of the file (and attributes like
    > "Size" when viewed in Details view) are coloured blue in Explorer, some
    > black. Usually all files are coloured black when I view them in Explorer.
    > This is true in all the possible view styles (Thumbnail, List, etc).
    >
    > I've tried working out why by looking at the properties of the files, but
    > they all look similar. Any ideas?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Alain
    >


    The blue files have been compressed.
     
  3. John Inzer

    John Inzer Flightless Bird

    Alain Dekker wrote:
    > I've got a folder containing a bunch of ZIP files. When I view the
    > list of files in Windows Explorer, the name of the file (and
    > attributes like "Size" when viewed in Details view) are coloured blue
    > in Explorer, some black. Usually all files are coloured black when I
    > view them in Explorer. This is true in all the possible view styles
    > (Thumbnail, List, etc).
    > I've tried working out why by looking at the properties of the files,
    > but they all look similar. Any ideas?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Alain

    =================================
    As Gordon stated...
    "The blue files have been compressed".

    If you right click one of the blue files and go to...
    Properties / General tab / Advanced button...
    you will find a checkmark in the
    "Compress contents to save disk space" box.

    --

    J. Inzer MS-MVP
    Digital Media Experience

    Notice
    This is not tech support
    I am a volunteer

    Solutions that work for
    me may not work for you

    Proceed at your own risk
     
  4. Bob I

    Bob I Flightless Bird

    Windows Explorer, Tools, Folder Options, View, Show encrypted or
    compressed NTFS files in color. Toggle to suite preference.

    Alain Dekker wrote:

    > I've got a folder containing a bunch of ZIP files. When I view the list of
    > files in Windows Explorer, the name of the file (and attributes like "Size"
    > when viewed in Details view) are coloured blue in Explorer, some black.
    > Usually all files are coloured black when I view them in Explorer. This is
    > true in all the possible view styles (Thumbnail, List, etc).
    >
    > I've tried working out why by looking at the properties of the files, but
    > they all look similar. Any ideas?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Alain
    >
    >
     
  5. Jim

    Jim Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 10:48:13 -0000, "Alain Dekker"
    <alain.dekker@NO.SPAM.loma.com> wrote:

    >I've got a folder containing a bunch of ZIP files. When I view the list of
    >files in Windows Explorer, the name of the file (and attributes like "Size"
    >when viewed in Details view) are coloured blue in Explorer, some black.
    >Usually all files are coloured black when I view them in Explorer. This is
    >true in all the possible view styles (Thumbnail, List, etc).
    >
    >I've tried working out why by looking at the properties of the files, but
    >they all look similar. Any ideas?
    >
    >Thanks,
    >Alain
    >


    Blue = zipped ; black = non-zipped .
     
  6. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    Don't you really mean 'compressed'?
    "Jim" <bojimbo261@googlemail.com> wrote in message
    news:8ddao51g4eu4jfcnml89jdlu3jtkle5f3f@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 10:48:13 -0000, "Alain Dekker"
    > <alain.dekker@NO.SPAM.loma.com> wrote:
    >
    >>I've got a folder containing a bunch of ZIP files. When I view the list of
    >>files in Windows Explorer, the name of the file (and attributes like
    >>"Size"
    >>when viewed in Details view) are coloured blue in Explorer, some black.
    >>Usually all files are coloured black when I view them in Explorer. This is
    >>true in all the possible view styles (Thumbnail, List, etc).
    >>
    >>I've tried working out why by looking at the properties of the files, but
    >>they all look similar. Any ideas?
    >>
    >>Thanks,
    >>Alain
    >>

    >
    > Blue = zipped ; black = non-zipped .
     
  7. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .

    A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not necessarily zipped
    as there are other methods for compressing file sizes. In the case of XP,
    with it compresses, it creates a zipped file.

    HTH,

    Twayne




    "Unknown" <unknown@unknown.kom> wrote in message
    news:uKYFijWtKHA.4428@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > Don't you really mean 'compressed'?
    > "Jim" <bojimbo261@googlemail.com> wrote in message
    > news:8ddao51g4eu4jfcnml89jdlu3jtkle5f3f@4ax.com...
    >> On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 10:48:13 -0000, "Alain Dekker"
    >> <alain.dekker@NO.SPAM.loma.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I've got a folder containing a bunch of ZIP files. When I view the list
    >>>of
    >>>files in Windows Explorer, the name of the file (and attributes like
    >>>"Size"
    >>>when viewed in Details view) are coloured blue in Explorer, some black.
    >>>Usually all files are coloured black when I view them in Explorer. This
    >>>is
    >>>true in all the possible view styles (Thumbnail, List, etc).
    >>>
    >>>I've tried working out why by looking at the properties of the files, but
    >>>they all look similar. Any ideas?
    >>>
    >>>Thanks,
    >>>Alain
    >>>

    >>
    >> Blue = zipped ; black = non-zipped .

    >
    >
     
  8. Tim Slattery

    Tim Slattery Flightless Bird

    "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote:

    >IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .
    >
    >A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not necessarily zipped
    >as there are other methods for compressing file sizes. In the case of XP,
    >with it compresses, it creates a zipped file.


    I don't think so. A file whose name is shown in blue has been
    compressed by the OS. This is *not* zip compression, it's something
    that the Windows OS does. It's not as drastic as zip, therefore
    doesn't take as long to do or to undo.

    WinXP also has built-in support for zipping and unzipping files but
    it's a totally different thing.

    --
    Tim Slattery
    Slattery_T@bls.gov
    http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     
  9. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    Well said Tim. That was my belief also.
    "Tim Slattery" <Slattery_T@bls.gov> wrote in message
    news:6eoao5h110aceg6vu58t7iv4uioro6m9m4@4ax.com...
    > "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote:
    >
    >>IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .
    >>
    >>A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not necessarily
    >>zipped
    >>as there are other methods for compressing file sizes. In the case of XP,
    >>with it compresses, it creates a zipped file.

    >
    > I don't think so. A file whose name is shown in blue has been
    > compressed by the OS. This is *not* zip compression, it's something
    > that the Windows OS does. It's not as drastic as zip, therefore
    > doesn't take as long to do or to undo.
    >
    > WinXP also has built-in support for zipping and unzipping files but
    > it's a totally different thing.
    >
    > --
    > Tim Slattery
    > Slattery_T@bls.gov
    > http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     
  10. joe

    joe Flightless Bird

    Does the OS do this automatically and if so under what circumstances ?

    "Tim Slattery" <Slattery_T@bls.gov> wrote in message
    news:6eoao5h110aceg6vu58t7iv4uioro6m9m4@4ax.com...
    > "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote:
    >
    >>IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .
    >>
    >>A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not necessarily
    >>zipped
    >>as there are other methods for compressing file sizes. In the case of XP,
    >>with it compresses, it creates a zipped file.

    >
    > I don't think so. A file whose name is shown in blue has been
    > compressed by the OS. This is *not* zip compression, it's something
    > that the Windows OS does. It's not as drastic as zip, therefore
    > doesn't take as long to do or to undo.
    >
    > WinXP also has built-in support for zipping and unzipping files but
    > it's a totally different thing.
    >
    > --
    > Tim Slattery
    > Slattery_T@bls.gov
    > http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     
  11. Tim Slattery

    Tim Slattery Flightless Bird

    "joe" <joe@ebox.com> wrote:

    >Does the OS do this automatically and if so under what circumstances ?


    You can tell it to compress or not compress files or directories
    (Right-click|Properties|General|Advanced...). And I believe it will
    automatically compress files and folders that are infrequently
    accessed.

    --
    Tim Slattery
    Slattery_T@bls.gov
    http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     
  12. Bob I

    Bob I Flightless Bird

    Yes if you run disk cleanup (see below)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_Cleanup

    joe wrote:

    > Does the OS do this automatically and if so under what circumstances ?
    >
    > "Tim Slattery" <Slattery_T@bls.gov> wrote in message
    > news:6eoao5h110aceg6vu58t7iv4uioro6m9m4@4ax.com...
    >
    >>"Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .
    >>>
    >>>A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not necessarily
    >>>zipped
    >>>as there are other methods for compressing file sizes. In the case of XP,
    >>>with it compresses, it creates a zipped file.

    >>
    >>I don't think so. A file whose name is shown in blue has been
    >>compressed by the OS. This is *not* zip compression, it's something
    >>that the Windows OS does. It's not as drastic as zip, therefore
    >>doesn't take as long to do or to undo.
    >>
    >>WinXP also has built-in support for zipping and unzipping files but
    >>it's a totally different thing.
    >>
    >>--
    >>Tim Slattery
    >>Slattery_T@bls.gov
    >>http://members.cox.net/slatteryt

    >
    >
    >
     
  13. joe

    joe Flightless Bird

    Thanks Bob and Tim. I was not aware of this and both of those situations
    apply to me.
    i.e. There are files which are infrequently accessed and I use 'disk
    cleanup' all the time.
    You learn something new every day :)


    "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:uj1GrOitKHA.4220@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Yes if you run disk cleanup (see below)
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_Cleanup
    >
    > joe wrote:
    >
    >> Does the OS do this automatically and if so under what circumstances ?
    >>
    >> "Tim Slattery" <Slattery_T@bls.gov> wrote in message
    >> news:6eoao5h110aceg6vu58t7iv4uioro6m9m4@4ax.com...
    >>
    >>>"Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .
    >>>>
    >>>>A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not necessarily
    >>>>zipped
    >>>>as there are other methods for compressing file sizes. In the case of
    >>>>XP,
    >>>>with it compresses, it creates a zipped file.
    >>>
    >>>I don't think so. A file whose name is shown in blue has been
    >>>compressed by the OS. This is *not* zip compression, it's something
    >>>that the Windows OS does. It's not as drastic as zip, therefore
    >>>doesn't take as long to do or to undo.
    >>>
    >>>WinXP also has built-in support for zipping and unzipping files but
    >>>it's a totally different thing.
    >>>
    >>>--
    >>>Tim Slattery
    >>>Slattery_T@bls.gov
    >>>http://members.cox.net/slatteryt

    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
     
  14. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:6eoao5h110aceg6vu58t7iv4uioro6m9m4@4ax.com,
    Tim Slattery <Slattery_T@bls.gov> typed:
    > "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote:
    >
    >> IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .
    >>
    >> A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not
    >> necessarily zipped as there are other methods for compressing file
    >> sizes. In the case of XP, with it compresses, it creates a zipped
    >> file.

    >
    > I don't think so. A file whose name is shown in blue has been
    > compressed by the OS. This is *not* zip compression, it's something
    > that the Windows OS does. It's not as drastic as zip, therefore
    > doesn't take as long to do or to undo.
    >
    > WinXP also has built-in support for zipping and unzipping files but
    > it's a totally different thing.


    If you check, you'll find the blue is zipped/compressed files and green is
    encrypted files. You can set/adjust these from the Properties menu for each
    file you right click Properties and choose Advanced for.
    Try it and see; You'll find that: Blue *IS* zip compression for XP NTFS
    drives. Compress or encrypt a file and see what color it changes to. The
    color indicator can also be turned off so they all display in black is so
    desired.

    In the future, please be more sure of your responses before becoming
    emphatic.

    HTH,

    Twayne




    --
    --
    Life is the only real counselor; wisdom unfiltered
    through personal experience does not become a
    part of the moral tissue.
     
  15. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:uWtdfYYtKHA.3656@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl,
    Unknown <unknown@unknown.kom> typed:
    > Well said Tim. That was my belief also.


    You're in error with your belief. It's easy enough to check out; try it.

    HTH,

    Twayne



    > "Tim Slattery" <Slattery_T@bls.gov> wrote in message
    > news:6eoao5h110aceg6vu58t7iv4uioro6m9m4@4ax.com...
    >> "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .
    >>>
    >>> A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not
    >>> necessarily zipped
    >>> as there are other methods for compressing file sizes. In the case
    >>> of XP, with it compresses, it creates a zipped file.

    >>
    >> I don't think so. A file whose name is shown in blue has been
    >> compressed by the OS. This is *not* zip compression, it's something
    >> that the Windows OS does. It's not as drastic as zip, therefore
    >> doesn't take as long to do or to undo.
    >>
    >> WinXP also has built-in support for zipping and unzipping files but
    >> it's a totally different thing.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Tim Slattery
    >> Slattery_T@bls.gov
    >> http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     
  16. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    Select a filename in win explorer;
    right click it and choose Properties.
    Click Advanced in the File Attributes area.
    Notice you can set archive bit, compress the file, or encrypt the file
    from there.
    Click to Compress the file and OK/close your way out.
    You might have to close/open explorer once in order to update so you can
    see the change, but the filename will have turned to blue text as long as
    you haven't turned off the colored display in Options. If instead you
    encrypted a file, the filename would have turned green.
    Caveat: You can't encrypt a file that has been compressed. I don't know
    why but that's the rule.
    Also, XP-compressed files are only compressed while on the disk; they are
    uncompressed as they are read from the drive, before they get to memory.
    With encryption, the only account that can view the files there of course
    are the account that created the encryption.

    HTH,

    Twayne





    In news:ukrYJWetKHA.3904@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl,
    joe <joe@ebox.com> typed:
    > Does the OS do this automatically and if so under what circumstances ?
    >
    > "Tim Slattery" <Slattery_T@bls.gov> wrote in message
    > news:6eoao5h110aceg6vu58t7iv4uioro6m9m4@4ax.com...
    >> "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .
    >>>
    >>> A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not
    >>> necessarily zipped
    >>> as there are other methods for compressing file sizes. In the case
    >>> of XP, with it compresses, it creates a zipped file.

    >>
    >> I don't think so. A file whose name is shown in blue has been
    >> compressed by the OS. This is *not* zip compression, it's something
    >> that the Windows OS does. It's not as drastic as zip, therefore
    >> doesn't take as long to do or to undo.
    >>
    >> WinXP also has built-in support for zipping and unzipping files but
    >> it's a totally different thing.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Tim Slattery
    >> Slattery_T@bls.gov
    >> http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     
  17. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:3k0do5ps9qsr9g649jcvnri92ln7d9up2m@4ax.com,
    Tim Slattery <Slattery_T@bls.gov> typed:
    > "joe" <joe@ebox.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Does the OS do this automatically and if so under what circumstances
    >> ?

    >
    > You can tell it to compress or not compress files or directories
    > (Right-click|Properties|General|Advanced...). And I believe it will
    > automatically compress files and folders that are infrequently
    > accessed.


    No, you can only compress the files/folders in that limb of the tree that
    way. To get infrequently used files compressed, use the Options settings so
    it applies to all folders on the drive.

    HTH,

    Twayne




    --
    --
    Life is the only real counselor; wisdom unfiltered
    through personal experience does not become a
    part of the moral tissue.
     
  18. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    Take a blue colored .ini file. It isn't unzipped. It is opened by Notepad.
    Try it.
    "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote in message
    news:-Ox4G4gltKHA.4636@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > In news:uWtdfYYtKHA.3656@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl,
    > Unknown <unknown@unknown.kom> typed:
    >> Well said Tim. That was my belief also.

    >
    > You're in error with your belief. It's easy enough to check out; try it.
    >
    > HTH,
    >
    > Twayne
    >
    >
    >
    >> "Tim Slattery" <Slattery_T@bls.gov> wrote in message
    >> news:6eoao5h110aceg6vu58t7iv4uioro6m9m4@4ax.com...
    >>> "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .
    >>>>
    >>>> A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not
    >>>> necessarily zipped
    >>>> as there are other methods for compressing file sizes. In the case
    >>>> of XP, with it compresses, it creates a zipped file.
    >>>
    >>> I don't think so. A file whose name is shown in blue has been
    >>> compressed by the OS. This is *not* zip compression, it's something
    >>> that the Windows OS does. It's not as drastic as zip, therefore
    >>> doesn't take as long to do or to undo.
    >>>
    >>> WinXP also has built-in support for zipping and unzipping files but
    >>> it's a totally different thing.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Tim Slattery
    >>> Slattery_T@bls.gov
    >>> http://members.cox.net/slatteryt

    >
    >
     
  19. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    I selected a file. The attribute compress is NOT checked. Yet the file name
    is in blue.
    I still think you are mistaken. It is not zipped but is compressed.
    "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote in message
    news:-OVZuTgltKHA.5940@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > In news:6eoao5h110aceg6vu58t7iv4uioro6m9m4@4ax.com,
    > Tim Slattery <Slattery_T@bls.gov> typed:
    >> "Twayne" <nobody@spamcop.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> IN XP's case, zip = compressed = zipped ... .
    >>>
    >>> A zipped file is compressed, but a compressed file is not
    >>> necessarily zipped as there are other methods for compressing file
    >>> sizes. In the case of XP, with it compresses, it creates a zipped
    >>> file.

    >>
    >> I don't think so. A file whose name is shown in blue has been
    >> compressed by the OS. This is *not* zip compression, it's something
    >> that the Windows OS does. It's not as drastic as zip, therefore
    >> doesn't take as long to do or to undo.
    >>
    >> WinXP also has built-in support for zipping and unzipping files but
    >> it's a totally different thing.

    >
    > If you check, you'll find the blue is zipped/compressed files and green is
    > encrypted files. You can set/adjust these from the Properties menu for
    > each file you right click Properties and choose Advanced for.
    > Try it and see; You'll find that: Blue *IS* zip compression for XP NTFS
    > drives. Compress or encrypt a file and see what color it changes to. The
    > color indicator can also be turned off so they all display in black is so
    > desired.
    >
    > In the future, please be more sure of your responses before becoming
    > emphatic.
    >
    > HTH,
    >
    > Twayne
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > --
    > Life is the only real counselor; wisdom unfiltered
    > through personal experience does not become a
    > part of the moral tissue.
     
  20. Tim Slattery

    Tim Slattery Flightless Bird

    "Unknown" <unknown@unknown.kom> wrote:

    >Take a blue colored .ini file. It isn't unzipped. It is opened by Notepad.


    Try to open a blue colored *.txt file in WinZip. It can't do it
    because it's not a zip file.

    --
    Tim Slattery
    Slattery_T@bls.gov
    http://members.cox.net/slatteryt
     

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