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Dual Boot Linux and XP

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Kathy Taylor, Apr 14, 2010.

  1. Kathy Taylor

    Kathy Taylor Flightless Bird

    I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has
    XP Pro installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I can
    dual boot with Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on
    the XP drive. Can I merely disconnect the XP drive and connect the drive
    I am going to put Ubuntu on, install it and then power down and connect
    the XP drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu or XP to boot (my
    computer will let me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)? If so,
    should the Ubuntu drive be connected to the same place on the
    motherboard where the XP drive is now and switch it to the second place
    on the motherboard or just go ahead and install Ubuntu with it connected
    to where it eventually will always be? Also, I have read that RAID might
    be a problem. If so, how? I hope I've been clear.

    Thank you.

    Kathy Spencer
     
  2. Michael John Ruff

    Michael John Ruff Flightless Bird

    On 14/04/2010 12:14, Kathy Taylor wrote:
    > I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has
    > XP Pro installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I can
    > dual boot with Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on
    > the XP drive. Can I merely disconnect the XP drive and connect the drive
    > I am going to put Ubuntu on, install it and then power down and connect
    > the XP drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu or XP to boot (my
    > computer will let me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)? If so,
    > should the Ubuntu drive be connected to the same place on the
    > motherboard where the XP drive is now and switch it to the second place
    > on the motherboard or just go ahead and install Ubuntu with it connected
    > to where it eventually will always be? Also, I have read that RAID might
    > be a problem. If so, how? I hope I've been clear.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Kathy Spencer

    Hello

    Connect it to were it will always be, I run something very similiar with
    4 different Operating System.

    Mike


    --
    Regards Mike
    MSCE, CCNA, Network+, A+, RHCE.
    Yes Posting from Windows, with lots of Linux Experience.
     
  3. Mick

    Mick Flightless Bird

    On 04/14/2010 07:14 AM, Kathy Taylor wrote:
    > I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has
    > XP Pro installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I can
    > dual boot with Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on
    > the XP drive. Can I merely disconnect the XP drive and connect the drive
    > I am going to put Ubuntu on, install it and then power down and connect
    > the XP drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu or XP to boot (my
    > computer will let me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)? If so,
    > should the Ubuntu drive be connected to the same place on the
    > motherboard where the XP drive is now and switch it to the second place
    > on the motherboard or just go ahead and install Ubuntu with it connected
    > to where it eventually will always be? Also, I have read that RAID might
    > be a problem. If so, how? I hope I've been clear.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Kathy Spencer

    Try . . . removing the first disk and installing Ubuntu on thesecond.
    Reconnect the first disk.
    On boot try F12 (watch for 'type Fx for boot menu)
    Using Grub makes it much easier and last time I did that removing the
    Ubuntu disk left the XP disk able to boot as it had done before!
     
  4. Kathy Taylor

    Kathy Taylor Flightless Bird

    Mick wrote:
    > On 04/14/2010 07:14 AM, Kathy Taylor wrote:
    >> I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has
    >> XP Pro installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I can
    >> dual boot with Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on
    >> the XP drive. Can I merely disconnect the XP drive and connect the drive
    >> I am going to put Ubuntu on, install it and then power down and connect
    >> the XP drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu or XP to boot (my
    >> computer will let me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)? If so,
    >> should the Ubuntu drive be connected to the same place on the
    >> motherboard where the XP drive is now and switch it to the second place
    >> on the motherboard or just go ahead and install Ubuntu with it connected
    >> to where it eventually will always be? Also, I have read that RAID might
    >> be a problem. If so, how? I hope I've been clear.
    >>
    >> Thank you.
    >>
    >> Kathy Spencer

    > Try . . . removing the first disk and installing Ubuntu on thesecond.
    > Reconnect the first disk.
    > On boot try F12 (watch for 'type Fx for boot menu)


    Mine's F8, not the F8 you use to go to Safe Mode.

    > Using Grub makes it much easier and last time I did that removing the
    > Ubuntu disk left the XP disk able to boot as it had done before!


    I'd rather not gamble on that.

    Kathy Taylor
     
  5. Mick

    Mick Flightless Bird

    On 04/14/2010 10:15 AM, Kathy Taylor wrote:
    > Mick wrote:
    >> On 04/14/2010 07:14 AM, Kathy Taylor wrote:
    >>> I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has
    >>> XP Pro installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I can
    >>> dual boot with Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on
    >>> the XP drive. Can I merely disconnect the XP drive and connect the drive
    >>> I am going to put Ubuntu on, install it and then power down and connect
    >>> the XP drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu or XP to boot (my
    >>> computer will let me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)? If so,
    >>> should the Ubuntu drive be connected to the same place on the
    >>> motherboard where the XP drive is now and switch it to the second place
    >>> on the motherboard or just go ahead and install Ubuntu with it connected
    >>> to where it eventually will always be? Also, I have read that RAID might
    >>> be a problem. If so, how? I hope I've been clear.
    >>>
    >>> Thank you.
    >>>
    >>> Kathy Spencer

    >> Try . . . removing the first disk and installing Ubuntu on thesecond.
    >> Reconnect the first disk.
    >> On boot try F12 (watch for 'type Fx for boot menu)

    >
    > Mine's F8, not the F8 you use to go to Safe Mode.
    >
    >> Using Grub makes it much easier and last time I did that removing the
    >> Ubuntu disk left the XP disk able to boot as it had done before!

    >
    > I'd rather not gamble on that.
    >
    > Kathy Taylor

    Then try what I suggested and use the BIOS set-up to put the preferred
    boot device as default. I'm doing that now to transfer from an older
    Ubuntu install to my current one. (Some problem with Timetrex on 9.10
    using MySQL, so converting it to postgresql).
     
  6. Kathy Taylor

    Kathy Taylor Flightless Bird

    Mick wrote:
    > On 04/14/2010 10:15 AM, Kathy Taylor wrote:
    >> Mick wrote:
    >>> On 04/14/2010 07:14 AM, Kathy Taylor wrote:
    >>>> I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has
    >>>> XP Pro installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I
    >>>> can
    >>>> dual boot with Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on
    >>>> the XP drive. Can I merely disconnect the XP drive and connect the
    >>>> drive
    >>>> I am going to put Ubuntu on, install it and then power down and connect
    >>>> the XP drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu or XP to boot (my
    >>>> computer will let me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)? If so,
    >>>> should the Ubuntu drive be connected to the same place on the
    >>>> motherboard where the XP drive is now and switch it to the second place
    >>>> on the motherboard or just go ahead and install Ubuntu with it
    >>>> connected
    >>>> to where it eventually will always be? Also, I have read that RAID
    >>>> might
    >>>> be a problem. If so, how? I hope I've been clear.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thank you.
    >>>>
    >>>> Kathy Spencer
    >>> Try . . . removing the first disk and installing Ubuntu on thesecond.
    >>> Reconnect the first disk.
    >>> On boot try F12 (watch for 'type Fx for boot menu)

    >>
    >> Mine's F8, not the F8 you use to go to Safe Mode.
    >>
    >>> Using Grub makes it much easier and last time I did that removing the
    >>> Ubuntu disk left the XP disk able to boot as it had done before!

    >>
    >> I'd rather not gamble on that.
    >>
    >> Kathy Taylor

    > Then try what I suggested and use the BIOS set-up to put the preferred
    > boot device as default.


    That's what I'm going to do.

    I'm doing that now to transfer from an older
    > Ubuntu install to my current one. (Some problem with Timetrex on 9.10
    > using MySQL, so converting it to postgresql).


    Thanks everyone!

    Kathy Taylor
     
  7. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird

    "Kathy Taylor" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:hq4842$2fd$1@speranza.aioe.org...
    >I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has XP
    >Pro installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I can dual
    >boot with Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on the XP
    >drive. Can I merely disconnect the XP drive and connect the drive I am
    >going to put Ubuntu on, install it and then power down and connect the XP
    >drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu or XP to boot (my computer will let
    >me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)? If so, should the Ubuntu
    >drive be connected to the same place on the motherboard where the XP drive
    >is now and switch it to the second place on the motherboard or just go
    >ahead and install Ubuntu with it connected to where it eventually will
    >always be? Also, I have read that RAID might be a problem. If so, how? I
    >hope I've been clear.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Kathy Spencer



    Kathy:
    In addition to the suggestions & recommendations you've already received,
    let me give you another possible option for your consideration...

    1. Since you're working with a desktop and further assuming your current PC
    case has an available vacant 5 1/4" bay.

    2. Consider equipping your PC with a removable hard drive (HDD). If you're
    not familiar with that type of device and without going into too many
    details at this point just let me say that a "mobile rack" (designed to
    house a removable tray or caddy which contains the HDD) is affixed to a 5
    1/4" bay on the computer case. The installation of such is quite simple -
    not any more complicated than installing a CD/DVD optical drive in one's
    system.

    The cost of these mobile racks is quite modest.

    3. The beauty of this type of hardware configuration is that you can work
    with multiple HDDs, each effectively isolated from each other (when desired)
    containing different operating systems. Through a simple turn of a keylock
    on the mobile rack, you can thus boot to this drive or that drive without
    the need for any "bootloader" or any other multi-booting software, as well
    as no need in most cases to access the motherboard's BIOS to change the boot
    priority order in order to boot to this or that particular HDD.

    We've been working with removable hard drives for about 15 years and
    probably have installed or help install more than a thousand of these
    devices over those years. By & large we've found this desktop PC hardware
    configuration a most desirable one for the great majority of desktop PC
    users. And we've found that the only regret virtually every desktop PC user
    of these devices has had is that they didn't install them sooner!

    If you're interested, so indicate and I'll provide more detailed info about
    this kind of system.
    Anna
     
  8. ray

    ray Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 13:14:50 +0200, Kathy Taylor wrote:

    > I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has
    > XP Pro installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I can
    > dual boot with Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on
    > the XP drive. Can I merely disconnect the XP drive and connect the drive
    > I am going to put Ubuntu on, install it and then power down and connect
    > the XP drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu or XP to boot (my
    > computer will let me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)? If so,
    > should the Ubuntu drive be connected to the same place on the
    > motherboard where the XP drive is now and switch it to the second place
    > on the motherboard or just go ahead and install Ubuntu with it connected
    > to where it eventually will always be? Also, I have read that RAID might
    > be a problem. If so, how? I hope I've been clear.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Kathy Spencer


    Sounds to me like you just want to experiment a little. If that's the
    case, I'd suggest you run a Linux Live CD - won't even require
    installation - or run it in a virtual machine from within your xp.
     
  9. Kathy Taylor

    Kathy Taylor Flightless Bird

    ray wrote:
    > On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 13:14:50 +0200, Kathy Taylor wrote:
    >
    >> I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has
    >> XP Pro installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I can
    >> dual boot with Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on
    >> the XP drive. Can I merely disconnect the XP drive and connect the drive
    >> I am going to put Ubuntu on, install it and then power down and connect
    >> the XP drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu or XP to boot (my
    >> computer will let me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)? If so,
    >> should the Ubuntu drive be connected to the same place on the
    >> motherboard where the XP drive is now and switch it to the second place
    >> on the motherboard or just go ahead and install Ubuntu with it connected
    >> to where it eventually will always be? Also, I have read that RAID might
    >> be a problem. If so, how? I hope I've been clear.
    >>
    >> Thank you.
    >>
    >> Kathy Spencer

    >
    > Sounds to me like you just want to experiment a little. If that's the
    > case, I'd suggest you run a Linux Live CD - won't even require
    > installation - or run it in a virtual machine from within your xp.


    No, I want to go for Ubuntu and get rid of XP -- eventually, not next
    week. I've already had a computer with Ubuntu and I know I like it. That
    computer, unfortunately, died the other day and a new hard drive for
    this machine was cheaper than a new computer.

    Kathy Taylor
     
  10. Kathy Taylor

    Kathy Taylor Flightless Bird

    Anna wrote:
    > Kathy:
    > In addition to the suggestions& recommendations you've already received,
    > let me give you another possible option for your consideration...
    >
    > 1. Since you're working with a desktop and further assuming your current PC
    > case has an available vacant 5 1/4" bay.
    >
    > 2. Consider equipping your PC with a removable hard drive (HDD). If you're
    > not familiar with that type of device and without going into too many
    > details at this point just let me say that a "mobile rack" (designed to
    > house a removable tray or caddy which contains the HDD) is affixed to a 5
    > 1/4" bay on the computer case. The installation of such is quite simple -
    > not any more complicated than installing a CD/DVD optical drive in one's
    > system.
    >
    > The cost of these mobile racks is quite modest.
    >
    > 3. The beauty of this type of hardware configuration is that you can work
    > with multiple HDDs, each effectively isolated from each other (when desired)
    > containing different operating systems. Through a simple turn of a keylock
    > on the mobile rack, you can thus boot to this drive or that drive without
    > the need for any "bootloader" or any other multi-booting software, as well
    > as no need in most cases to access the motherboard's BIOS to change the boot
    > priority order in order to boot to this or that particular HDD.
    >
    > We've been working with removable hard drives for about 15 years and
    > probably have installed or help install more than a thousand of these
    > devices over those years. By& large we've found this desktop PC hardware
    > configuration a most desirable one for the great majority of desktop PC
    > users. And we've found that the only regret virtually every desktop PC user
    > of these devices has had is that they didn't install them sooner!
    >
    > If you're interested, so indicate and I'll provide more detailed info about
    > this kind of system.
    > Anna
    >
    >


    Does one have to open the case every time one wants to change to a
    different hard drive? I have no experience with what you're suggesting.
    Or are you saying this rack would be put in the same space as the DVD
    burner takes? I have two open spaces there. If that's the case, yes, I
    am very interested!

    Kathy Taylor
     
  11. jellybean stonerfish

    jellybean stonerfish Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 13:14:50 +0200, Kathy Taylor wrote:

    > I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has
    > XP Pro installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I can
    > dual boot with Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on
    > the XP drive. Can I merely disconnect the XP drive and connect the drive
    > I am going to put Ubuntu on, install it and then power down and connect
    > the XP drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu or XP to boot (my
    > computer will let me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)? If so,
    > should the Ubuntu drive be connected to the same place on the
    > motherboard where the XP drive is now and switch it to the second place
    > on the motherboard or just go ahead and install Ubuntu with it connected
    > to where it eventually will always be? Also, I have read that RAID might
    > be a problem. If so, how? I hope I've been clear.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Kathy Spencer


    1. Install the blank disk where you want it to be.
    2. Boot computer from the install CD
    3. Install operating system, choosing the correct disk when
    the choice is available.
    4. Let the boot loader be put on the new disk.
    5. Complete install.
    6. On reboot, choose to boot from the new disk.
    7. At the boot prompt, choose operating system.
     
  12. Peter Foldes

    Peter Foldes Flightless Bird

    Crossposted for a better answer

    "Kathy Taylor" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:hq4842$2fd$1@speranza.aioe.org...
    >I have a desk top computer that uses SATA hard drives. It currently has XP Pro
    >installed on one drive. I want to add another SATA drive so I can dual boot with
    >Ubuntu. What I don 't want is Grub putting its stuff on the XP drive. Can I merely
    >disconnect the XP drive and connect the drive I am going to put Ubuntu on, install
    >it and then power down and connect the XP drive and use the BIOS to choose Ubuntu
    >or XP to boot (my computer will let me choose where to boot by pressing an F key)?
    >If so, should the Ubuntu drive be connected to the same place on the motherboard
    >where the XP drive is now and switch it to the second place on the motherboard or
    >just go ahead and install Ubuntu with it connected to where it eventually will
    >always be? Also, I have read that RAID might be a problem. If so, how? I hope I've
    >been clear.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Kathy Spencer
     
  13. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird

    (Kathy is interested in installing two different OSs (XP & Linux) in her
    PC).

    > Anna wrote:
    >> Kathy:
    >> In addition to the suggestions& recommendations you've already received,
    >> let me give you another possible option for your consideration...
    >>
    >> 1. Since you're working with a desktop and further assuming your current
    >> PC
    >> case has an available vacant 5 1/4" bay.
    >>
    >> 2. Consider equipping your PC with a removable hard drive (HDD). If
    >> you're
    >> not familiar with that type of device and without going into too many
    >> details at this point just let me say that a "mobile rack" (designed to
    >> house a removable tray or caddy which contains the HDD) is affixed to a 5
    >> 1/4" bay on the computer case. The installation of such is quite simple -
    >> not any more complicated than installing a CD/DVD optical drive in one's
    >> system.
    >>
    >> The cost of these mobile racks is quite modest.
    >>
    >> 3. The beauty of this type of hardware configuration is that you can work
    >> with multiple HDDs, each effectively isolated from each other (when
    >> desired)
    >> containing different operating systems. Through a simple turn of a
    >> keylock
    >> on the mobile rack, you can thus boot to this drive or that drive without
    >> the need for any "bootloader" or any other multi-booting software, as
    >> well
    >> as no need in most cases to access the motherboard's BIOS to change the
    >> boot
    >> priority order in order to boot to this or that particular HDD.
    >>
    >> We've been working with removable hard drives for about 15 years and
    >> probably have installed or help install more than a thousand of these
    >> devices over those years. By& large we've found this desktop PC hardware
    >> configuration a most desirable one for the great majority of desktop PC
    >> users. And we've found that the only regret virtually every desktop PC
    >> user
    >> of these devices has had is that they didn't install them sooner!
    >>
    >> If you're interested, so indicate and I'll provide more detailed info
    >> about
    >> this kind of system.
    >> Anna



    "Kathy Taylor" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:hq4nkk$bob$1@speranza.aioe.org...
    > Does one have to open the case every time one wants to change to a
    > different hard drive? I have no experience with what you're suggesting. Or
    > are you saying this rack would be put in the same space as the DVD burner
    > takes? I have two open spaces there. If that's the case, yes, I am very
    > interested!
    >
    > Kathy Taylor



    Kathy:
    First of all the answer to your first question is "no"; there is no need to
    get inside the PC case when using removable hard drives. All operations are
    accomplished outside the PC case.

    And yes, the mobile rack will be installed in a vacant 5 1/4" bay - the same
    type of bay ("space") that houses a CD-DVD optical drive. Since you have two
    available (vacant) 5 1/4" bays (do I understand you correctly?), you have an
    ideal situation for installing one (or better even two) mobile racks
    containing the removable HDDs. Here are some details...

    BTW, I'm assuming that you're working with SATA hard drives. However, these
    mobile racks that I'm going to describe also come in versions designed for
    PATA hard drives.

    These mobile racks are two-piece affairs - the rack itself and the inner
    tray or caddy (in which the hard drive (HDD) resides) that slides into the
    rack. They come in all-aluminum models or a combination of aluminum-plastic,
    or all-plastic, ranging in price from about $15 to $50. Mobile racks come
    in various versions, depending upon whether the hard drive to be housed is
    an IDE/ATA, SATA, or SCSI device. A Google search for "removable hard drive
    mobile racks" will result in a wealth of information on these products and
    their vendors.

    For the past three years or so we've been primarily using the Athena Power
    MR-125B mobile rack. See...
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817123302.
    It's an all-plastic model but has proven very reliable for us. (It also
    comes in a basically similar all-aluminum version at slightly higher cost).
    The rack has a bottom-mounted 80mm fan that's virtually inaudible. What we
    particularly like about it (aside from its reliability and reasonable cost
    of about $20) is that rather than use an ON-OFF keylock switch, a simple
    push-to-release lever (in effect) turns the device on or off, thus it can be
    easily physically connected or disconnected from the system. It's an
    important consideration for us since we're continually changing HDDs and
    trying to find the key can be an annoyance for us. But most of these devices
    do come with the keylock mechanism.

    The installation of these devices is simplicity itself - no more difficult
    than installing an optical drive (CD-DVD drive). After the rack is installed
    you just plop the hard drive into the removable tray (caddy), make two
    simple connections (power & data cable), and slide the tray into the mobile
    rack. Note that the removable hard drive mobile racks we are discussing are
    designed to be installed in desktop computers and not laptop or notebook
    computers. The size, weight, and design considerations of laptops/notebooks
    (generally) do not allow for this hardware configuration.

    As I previously indicated, these mobile racks are generally equipped with a
    ON-OFF keylock, so a simple turn of the key, in effect, activates the HDD.
    For added security you can push or pull the removable tray in or out using
    the tray's handle and thus electrically/physically connect or disconnect the
    HDD from the system. No more difficult than opening or closing a small desk
    drawer.

    Can you see the enormous advantage of this type of hardware configuration as
    it applies to your objective of working with two OSs? In your particular
    situation (assuming you would be working with a single removable HDD) you
    would install one of your SATA HDDs internally and the other SATA HDD would
    be housed in the removable tray of the mobile rack. The latter would be
    connected to your motherboard's first (SATA0 or SATA1) connector, while the
    internally-connected SATA HDD would be connected to the second (SATA1 or
    SATA2) connector. (Naturally I'm assuming this is a non-RAID configuration).

    So when the removable HDD containing the XP OS is "on", the system will boot
    to that drive and the internally-connected HDD would serve as a secondary
    HDD. Should you wish to boot to your Linux OS, the removable HDD would
    simply be set to the "off" position.

    Thus, when the removable HDD is set to the "off" position, the system will
    boot to the internally-installed HDD. Again, no need to fiddle with
    modifications of the BIOS settings or system files affecting the boot
    process, or using some third-party "boot manager". It's an ideal system for
    computing with multiple operating systems or meeting one's special
    interests.

    So that in your case (as an example) let's say you install your HDD
    containing the XP OS as the removable HDD. Your HDD containing the Linux OS
    would be installed as your internal HDD. The mobile rack containing the
    removable HDD would be connected to your motherboard's SATA0 (or SATA1)
    connector and the internal HDD connected to the next SATA connector (SATA1
    or SATA2). Your motherboard's BIOS setting for boot priority would be set
    for a first hard drive boot to the removable HDD (your XP OS); the second
    hard drive boot would be set to the internally-connected HDD. There would be
    no further need to access the BIOS boot priority settings.

    If I understand you correctly you can have even additional flexibility in
    that you indicate you have *two* vacant 5 1/4" bays. Am I correct about
    this?

    If that is indeed the case installing *two* removable HDDs would be even
    better. Obviously you would need *two* vacant 5 1/4" bays on your desktop
    case to achieve this configuration. With this configuration, each drive is
    effectively isolated from each other, but if for any reason you want both
    drives connected during bootup, you can easily achieve that configuration as
    well.

    Again, the cost of equipping your desktop PC with one or two removable HDDs
    is quite modest.

    Keep in mind that another significant advantage of using a removable HDD is
    that now you can have an *unlimited* number of HDDs at your disposal by
    simply using additional removable trays to house additional drives. So that
    another important advantage of using this hardware configuration is that
    you'll be able to use one or more other removable HDDs as one or more
    backups drive for your day-to-day working HDDs. Or let's say you want to
    work with the Windows 7 OS in addition to your XP & Linux OSs. Now you can
    easily do that with your removable HDD configuration.

    We've worked with these removable hard drive affairs for quite a number of
    years now and have helped hundreds of users install & operate this kind of
    system. Virtually ever user we're aware of has found this hardware
    arrangement a most desirable configuration in a desktop PC environment.
    We've encountered no negative performance issues using these devices in
    comparison with internally-installed HDDs and find the flexibility and peace
    of mind you gain from this configuration an enormous advantage in day-to-day
    PC computing.

    So do give it some thought if it is practical in your situation.
    Anna
     
  14. Kathy Taylor

    Kathy Taylor Flightless Bird

    Anna wrote:
    > (Kathy is interested in installing two different OSs (XP& Linux) in her
    > PC).


    To change from one hard drive to another requires a reboot? I looked at
    some web sites since I saw your post and they all say "hot swappable".
    What does that mean?

    Thanks for all your help.

    Kathy Taylor
     
  15. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird

    "Kathy Taylor" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:hq4usb$u3s$3@speranza.aioe.org...
    > Anna wrote:
    >> (Kathy is interested in installing two different OSs (XP& Linux) in her
    >> PC).

    >
    > To change from one hard drive to another requires a reboot? I looked at
    > some web sites since I saw your post and they all say "hot swappable".
    > What does that mean?
    >
    > Thanks for all your help.
    >
    > Kathy Taylor



    Kathy:
    Yes, it would be necessary to shut down the PC in order to boot to the other
    OS. For example, if you booted to your XP OS contained on your removable HDD
    and then desired to boot to your Linux OS contained on your
    internally-connected HDD, you would first have to shut down the PC,
    power-off (or disconnect) the removable HDD and then power-on your PC.
    Obviously you understand you're doing all this from the comfort of your
    computer chair, right?

    I do not know in what specific context that "hot swappable" phrase you came
    across was used. I would only guess that it refers to the fact that either
    you could install different hard drives in the mobile rack and use each as a
    removable HDD at different times or the fact that if you were using two
    removable HDDs (two mobile racks installed), the removable HDD connected as
    a secondary storage device could be "swapped", i.e., another secondary HDD
    in the removable tray could be installed in its place while the system had
    booted to the other OS.

    As an example...
    Let's say you were working with two removable HDDs (two mobile racks
    installed in your PC case) and you have booted to your XP OS contained on
    the "first" removable HDD. Your other removable HDD containing the Linux OS
    is connected as a secondary HDD, or you have not connected that latter HDD
    at all during this XP boot operation.

    Now you decide to use your backup program to backup the contents of your XP
    OS HDD. You have a third HDD installed in a removable tray which you use for
    backup purposes. You would simply insert that removable tray in the mobile
    rack (after removing the removable tray containing your Linux system should
    that removable HDD be present) and perform the backup operation. To that
    extent the backup (secondary) HDD in its removable tray is "hot swappable".
    It can later be removed following the backup operation without any problem
    while the system is still booted to the XP OS.

    Similarly if you used other HDDs in removable trays they could likewise be
    inserted in the second mobile rack while the system has been booted to this
    or that OS. Naturally any "other" HDD used in that way would be treated by
    the system as a secondary HDD. If that HDD contained an OS it would not be
    booted to until you shut down the PC and specifically booted to that
    particular OS.
    Anna
     
  16. Kathy Taylor

    Kathy Taylor Flightless Bird

    Anna wrote:

    > Kathy:
    > Yes, it would be necessary to shut down the PC in order to boot to the other
    > OS. For example, if you booted to your XP OS contained on your removable HDD
    > and then desired to boot to your Linux OS contained on your
    > internally-connected HDD, you would first have to shut down the PC,
    > power-off (or disconnect) the removable HDD and then power-on your PC.
    > Obviously you understand you're doing all this from the comfort of your
    > computer chair, right?
    >
    > I do not know in what specific context that "hot swappable" phrase you came
    > across was used. I would only guess that it refers to the fact that either
    > you could install different hard drives in the mobile rack and use each as a
    > removable HDD at different times or the fact that if you were using two
    > removable HDDs (two mobile racks installed), the removable HDD connected as
    > a secondary storage device could be "swapped", i.e., another secondary HDD
    > in the removable tray could be installed in its place while the system had
    > booted to the other OS.
    >
    > As an example...
    > Let's say you were working with two removable HDDs (two mobile racks
    > installed in your PC case) and you have booted to your XP OS contained on
    > the "first" removable HDD. Your other removable HDD containing the Linux OS
    > is connected as a secondary HDD, or you have not connected that latter HDD
    > at all during this XP boot operation.
    >
    > Now you decide to use your backup program to backup the contents of your XP
    > OS HDD. You have a third HDD installed in a removable tray which you use for
    > backup purposes. You would simply insert that removable tray in the mobile
    > rack (after removing the removable tray containing your Linux system should
    > that removable HDD be present) and perform the backup operation. To that
    > extent the backup (secondary) HDD in its removable tray is "hot swappable".
    > It can later be removed following the backup operation without any problem
    > while the system is still booted to the XP OS.
    >
    > Similarly if you used other HDDs in removable trays they could likewise be
    > inserted in the second mobile rack while the system has been booted to this
    > or that OS. Naturally any "other" HDD used in that way would be treated by
    > the system as a secondary HDD. If that HDD contained an OS it would not be
    > booted to until you shut down the PC and specifically booted to that
    > particular OS.
    > Anna
    >
    >
    >
    >


    Thank you. You've been very helpful. I'm going to order a few from New Egg.

    Kathy Taylor.
     

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